“End-of-life care: no, we don’t all want ‘whatever it takes’ to prolong life” – The Conversation

Though this article is from an Australian perspective, the context is transportable.

“We all die eventually, of course, but these days it’s very hard for doctors and loved ones to let patients and relatives die without first doing ‘whatever it takes’ to try to keep them alive. That is, unless they’ve left clear instructions to the contrary.

“The overwhelming priority for doctors is to save life. In the last few decades, technologies have progressed so far and fast that doctors are able to embark on treatments that until recently did not exist, or were too risky to consider.

“The extra years of good health are wonderful. But everything comes at a price. While we and our loved ones can often be kept alive, this may involve burdensome treatment and awful outcomes.

“But while the default position of medicine is to prolong life, staying alive isn’t everyone’s number-one priority, as my soon-to-be published survey results reveal.”

end-of-life

Click here to read this article from The Conversation in its entirety.

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