Monthly Archives: April, 2018

“It always seems too early, until it’s too late.” | Tomorrow is National Healthcare Decisions Day

NHDD_Dateless_LogoMonday, April 16 is National Healthcare Decisions Day – “National Healthcare Decisions Day exists to inspire, educate and empower the public and providers about the importance of advance care planning.”

“Ideally, each of us would be able to make our own health care decisions throughout our lives. But in reality, many will have at least a limited period of time when we are unable to communicate our health care choices.  Advance health care directives increase the likelihood our wishes are followed, when we are not in a position to voice them.

“Advance health care directives are written directions that appoint another individual to make heath care decisions when a patient is unable to effect such decisions, and frequently include patients’ specific directions on the care they want to receive. Advance directives include a power of attorney that appoints a health care agent, a living will that leaves instructions on end-of-life care, do-not resuscitate orders and values surveys that offer guidance on care decisions.

“To encourage advance health care planning, April 16th is National Health Care Decisions Day. Most adults put off planning and may be confused by conflicting information and myths about advance health care planning.  Let’s clear up a few common myths:

“Myth No. 1: Advance directives are only for older people.

False. It is true older people are most likely to use advance directives, but every adult needs one. You never know when an accident or injury might leave you temporarily unable to communicate. Young adults should at a minimum name someone to make health care decisions when they can’t.

Click here to see a broader list of common myths and responses from this article, “A Call to Action for National Health Care Decisions Day” at the American Bar Association Website.

“First-Ever Evictions Database Shows: ‘We’re In the Middle Of A Housing Crisis'” – NPR

evictions“Julie Holzhauer stands among her family’s possessions after being evicted from her home in Centennial, Colo., in 2011. – John Moore/Getty Images”

by Terry Gross

“For many poor families in America, eviction is a real and ongoing threat. Sociologist Matthew Desmond estimates that 2.3 million evictions were filed in the U.S. in 2016 — a rate of four every minute.

“‘Eviction isn’t just a condition of poverty; it’s a cause of poverty,’ Desmond says. ‘Eviction is a direct cause of homelessness, but it also is a cause of residential instability, school instability [and] community instability.’”

Read this article in its entirety at NPR, click here.

 

“New Medicare ID Card Mailing Delayed a Month; but first-time enrollees will get redesigned cards now” – AARP

medicare card delayCenters for Medicare & Medicaid Services via AP

Medicare officials say they have delayed mailing out the new Medicare identification cards to current beneficiaries because they are stepping up their anti-fraud initiatives.

“According to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), beneficiaries living in Delaware, the District of Columbia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia will begin receiving their new Medicare ID cards in May, not April, as originally scheduled.

“‘We are working on making our processes even better by using the highest levels of fraud protection when we mail new cards to current Medicare beneficiaries,’ the CMS notes.

“The CMS also announced that new enrollees in Medicare will automatically get the revamped cards, regardless of where they live.”

Continue reading this article at AARP, click here.

Also read this article: “Risk of Falling for a Medicare Card-Replacement Scam High | New AARP survey finds most beneficiaries unaware of redesigned card initiative”

Coming soon to the Ware Center – two wonderful “inclusive arts program” productions. Get your tickets now.

family fun fest

Here are two wonderful “inclusive arts programs” coming to the Ware Center of Millersville University in downtown Lancaster.

The first is a dance performance created especially for kids – SNOW WHITE by the PENNSYLVANIA BALLET on April 21 which will include both ASL INTERPRETATION and AUDIO-DESCRIPTION.  There will also be a sensory tour of the stage and props just prior to the performance and an opportunity to meet with dancers afterwards.  

The second is a presentation on May 6 is PETER GROS of MUTUAL of OMAHA’s WILD KINGDOM featuring live exotic animals, although that will take place on the Millersville campus, not downtown.  That show will also feature ASL INTERPRETATION and AUDIO-DESCRIPTION, but it will also be SENSORY FRIENDLY.

Both come with hands-on creative activities for kids beginning one hour before show time.

These performances are selling very well, but there are still seats available.

If you know families with financial need, email Barry Kornhauser at Barry.Kornhauser@Millersville.edu.

 

“Why most nonprofit boards resemble whiteboards and how to fix that” – The Conversation

“At a time when only 61.3 percent of Americans are white, about 84 percent of nonprofit board members are in that demographic group, along with 90 percent of nonprofit board chairs.”

white board“Nonprofit boards should be more diverse than this group, but too often they’re not. dotshock/Shutterstock.com”

“You may not recognize the name Tarana Burke. She’s the black woman who founded the #MeToo movement a decade ago to support women of color who survive sexual harassment and assault.

“Although this movement has mostly directed attention to work-related abuses involving white women since it hit critical mass in 2017, it also speaks to me as a black man because of the racial discrimination I personally experienced many years ago as a nonprofit CEO.

“Today, I blame that predicament on the lack of leadership diversity on my nonprofit’s board … ”

Continue reading this article at The Conversation.

“Microhospitals and healthplexes offer a peek at the future of health care” – First Opinion, STATNews

miniature health care team and medical tool,stethoscope

The once insular health care industry now finds itself facing the fallout from decades spent resisting change: an all-sides blitz orchestrated by outsiders intent on doing the changing for it. Besieged by upstarts and titans alike, even the most change-averse organizations are being forced to adapt to this threat. For leaders already laying foundations for innovation within the industry, these disruptions are providing new platforms on which to build the health care delivery models of the future.

“Hospitals have long been the exemplar of the old-school model, where bigger is better, evolution is met with suspicion, and more services — regardless of their necessity — mean more lucrative kickbacks from the regulators in charge. As hospitals cling to their shiny facades and standard procedures, the federal government props them up with inefficient regulations and misdirected incentives. Bureaucrats pay them to diagnose and treat illnesses, shelling out money every time a doctor orders a test or performs a procedure. This keeps hospitals in the sickness business — not the health care business.”

Click here to read this STATNews article in its entirety.

What is Person-Centered Counseling?

“Person-centered counseling (PCC) allows individuals to be engaged in the decision making process about their options, preferences, values, and financial resources. Individuals in need of services or who are planning for the future have access to one-on-one counseling in a variety of settings, including within the home, community residence, acute care hospital, school settings, or several other settings based on the individual’s needs.

“PCC is a valuable tool for the aging and disability networks that can improve access to care through streamlined partnerships, technology, and resources that put the focus on the needs of people and their caregivers.

“A person-centered system recognizes that every individual is unique and the system must be able to respond flexibly to each individual’s situation, strengths, needs and preferences. Person-Centered Counseling is centered on the individual and their personal goals and desires, and is much broader in scope than any formal assessment or eligibility determination process tied to a public or private program.

PersonCenteredCounselingInfographic

The Person-Centered Counseling Training Program

“The Administration for Community Living (ACL) is offering a course designed to help individuals build competency working with person-centered counseling (PCC). There are 23.6 million people in need of PCC every year. The practice of person-centered counseling is built on the principle that individuals receiving counseling should be given power over the options surrounding the services they are receiving. This includes allowing the individual to choose where they would like to access counseling. Person-centered counseling centers on the specific needs of an individual, their families, and their caregivers, tailoring resources to fit their unique needs.

“This course is split in six parts, spanning from an introduction to No Wrong Door Systems to the role of advocacy. While the majority of the components are online, course 2B: Person-Centered Thinking and Practice is held in-person. Interested parties may register for a free trial of the first part of the course here.

 

“In 83 Million Eviction Records, a Sweeping and Intimate New Look at Housing in America” – The New York Times

eviction

“RICHMOND, Va. — Before the first hearings on the morning docket, the line starts to clog the lobby of the John Marshall Courthouse. No cellphones are allowed inside, but many of the people who’ve been summoned don’t learn that until they arrive. ‘Put it in your car,’ the sheriff’s deputies suggest at the metal detector. That advice is no help to renters who have come by bus. To make it inside, some tuck their phones in the bushes nearby.

“This courthouse handles every eviction in Richmond, a city with one of the highest eviction rates in the country, according to new data covering dozens of states and compiled by a team led by the Princeton sociologist Matthew Desmond.

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City

 

Two years ago, Mr. Desmond turned eviction into a national topic of conversation with ‘Evicted,’ a book that chronicled how poor families who lost their homes in Milwaukee sank ever deeper into poverty. It became a favorite among civic groups and on college campuses, some here in Richmond. Bill Gates and former President Obama named it among the best books they had read in 2017, and it was awarded a Pulitzer Prize.

But for all the attention the problem began to draw, even Mr. Desmond could not say how widespread it was.”

Continue reading this New York Times article, click here.

 

Veterans Healing Through Connection | a no-cost therapeutic couples retreat for all current and former service members

VETERANS HEALING

To download as a .pdf file for sharing / printing / enlarging, click here.

On April 24, join a Webinar – “Medicaid Work Requirements: Impacts at the State and Federal Levels”

medicaid work requirement

RSVP to the webinar here.