“The Comforting Fictions of Dementia Care” – The New Yorker

“Many facilities are using nostalgic environments as a means of soothing the misery, panic, and rage their residents experience.”

fictions of dementia care“The memory-care unit in Ohio’s Chagrin Valley is designed to look like an American town from its residents’ childhoods.” – Photograph by Philip Montgomery for The New Yorker

by Larissa MacFarquhar

“The large central room of the memory-care unit was designed to look like an old-fashioned American town square. There was a small fountain, surrounded by plants and a low stone wall; there were a couple of lampposts, and benches, tables, and chairs set about. The carpet was mottled with darker and lighter shades of green, to resemble grass growing and bending in different directions. Along the walls were the façades of what looked like clapboard houses, with wooden shutters and shingled pitched roofs and porches that extended into the room. Two long hallways, which led off from opposite sides of the central room, looked like streets in the same town, with more clapboard façades and porches on either side. These façades were not altogether fake: each front door opened onto a suite of small rooms—living room, bedroom, bathroom—that was a resident’s home.

“Some of the porches had rocking chairs that you could sit in and watch people go by. Many of the residents were quite restless, and there was nowhere else to go, so people did walk by fairly often. Daylight came in through high windows just below the ceiling, and the ceiling itself consisted of bright light panels painted to look like a blue sky dotted with clouds. In the evening, as it began to grow dark outside, lights on the porches came on. Sometime later, the street lamps were lit; and finally, around eight o’clock, the ceiling sky was switched off, so that the unit came to look like a small-town street at night.

“The illusion was surprisingly effective.”

This is a long read; click here to continue reading this article at The New Yorker.

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