Monthly Archives: July, 2019

“How Much do you Need to Earn to Afford a Modest Apartment in your area?

out of reach

How Much do you Need to Earn to Afford a Modest Apartment in your area? Click here to find out.

“What baby boomers can learn from millennials at work- and vice versa” – TEDTalk

Recall the 2015 movie, The Intern with Robert DeNiro?

AARP reports, “The job market is looking bright for older Americans who are looking for jobs.

“If you think older workers are sitting around twiddling their thumbs, hesitant to contact employers in a tightening labor market, you’d be wrong. In February, the unemployment rate for those 55 and older was 3.2 percent — nearly a full point lower than the overall 4.1 percent rate for the entire U.S. population and drastically lower than the 14.4 percent rate for teens.”

workers

“For the first time ever, we have five generations in the workplace at the same time, says entrepreneur Chip Conley. What would happen if we got intentional about how we all work together? In this accessible talk, Conley shows how age diversity makes companies stronger and calls for different generations to mentor each other at work, with wisdom flowing from old to young and young to old alike.” – Watch this energizing 12-minute TEDTalk.

“Isolated And Struggling, Many Seniors Are Turning To Suicide” – NPR

suicide rates

by Josh Axelrod, Samantha Balaban and Scott Simon

“Dr. Julie Rickard thought her visit to Wisconsin over the Christmas holiday would bring a break from her day job working in suicide prevention in Wenatchee, Wash.

“The visit didn’t go as planned. After a tense fight broke out between her mother and another family member, everyone dispersed. Rickard readied herself for the trip back to the Pacific Northwest.

“At the airport, she received a call from her mother, Sheri Adler. This was not out of the ordinary — Adler, like many adoring mothers, always calls her daughter after parting ways.

On the phone, Adler wanted to tell her daughter how much she loved and appreciated her.

“‘Normally I would think, “Oh that’s a sign of suicide … ”’”

Continue reading this article at NPR.org.

Understanding Medicaid Buy-in: A Tool to Advance Employment for People with Disabilities

medicaid buy in

The Administration for Community Living (ACL), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), and the Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) have released a new question and answer [JS1] document to help grantees, stakeholders, and self-advocates better understand the Medicaid buy-in program. The Medicaid buy-in program includes Medicaid eligibility groups that serve workers with disabilities who are earning income and whom states may charge premiums as a condition of Medicaid eligibility.
The Q&A has been released as the country celebrates the 29th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) this week.

Opioids and older Americans | clear and present threat; FREE presentations near you about “controlling the opioid epidemic in our aging and disabled populations”

Recent “revelations” about the pharmaceutical manufacturers producuction and marketing of opioids has garnered national media attention … finally.

This New York Times opinion column, The Four Ordinary People Who Took On Big PharmaThey tried to warn us about the dangers of OxyContin. Almost two decades later, we’re finally listening.”

“It was the early 2000s, and they usually talked over old-school computer message boards. Occasionally they gathered in person, carrying posters of their children and middle-aged spouses — all dead from OxyContin overdoses.”

We now know that the warnings these people tried to send matched the incidents that the 2015 book, Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic.

“In 1929, in the blue-collar city of Portsmouth, Ohio, a company built a swimming pool the size of a football field; named Dreamland, it became the vital center of the community. Now, addiction has devastated Portsmouth, as it has hundreds of small rural towns and suburbs across America—addiction like no other the country has ever faced. How that happened is the riveting story of Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic.

“Acclaimed journalist Sam Quinones weaves together two riveting tales of capitalism run amok whose unintentional collision has been a catastrophic opiate epidemic.

“The unfettered prescribing of pain medications during the 1990s reached its peak in Purdue Pharma’s campaign to market OxyContin, its new, expensive—extremely addictive—miracle painkiller.”

dreamland

Opioids have reached into so many families across the nation; the addictions know no barriers. Young and old; male and female; black and white … the stories of people who have, and continue, to struggle with addiction abound.

opioids chronic painClick on the above graphic to read more about chronic pain and opioids. “The rapid growth in opioid overdoses has put a spotlight on opioid prescribing patterns, with increased pressure on clinicians to reduce opioid prescribing, especially for long-term management of chronic, noncancer pain.” 

Because many older persons contend with debilitating pain and in some cases addiciton, the Pennsylvania Link to Aging and Disability Resources is collaborating with the Office of the Attorney General to hold free presentations: “Opioids & Dangerous Drugs | A FREE presentation about controlling the opioid epidemic in our aging and disabled populations” in Berks, Lancaster and Lebanon Counties in August.

Each of these presentations is open to all and FREE to attend. Click on the links below for more information and RSVP specifics.

 

“How Janet views independent living with disability and mental health issues” – Public Source

Janet“Janet Simeone calls ACCESS, a door-to-door paratransit service in Allegheny County, to confirm an upcoming ride. Whether or not the paratransit shows up on time is a point of anxiety for Simeone.”

“Janet Simeone never expected to live on her own. Yet at age 71, she’s four years into living alone in a Greenfield apartment.

“Simeone has been diagnosed with an intellectual disability.

Combined with depression and anxiety, she has difficulty doing things on her own, including making friends and living independently.

“Simeone lived with her aunt, Laurie Raffaele, for almost 10 years. And it was her aunt who ultimately pushed her to try living alone. She thought it would help Simeone feel control over her life and provide an opportunity for her to make friends.

“One day, her aunt told her about an apartment she’d found in Greenfield.”

Read this article at Public Source in its entirety, click here.

 

“The science of regrettable decisions | A doctor explains how our brains can trick us into making bad choices — and how to fight back.” – VOX

by Robert Pearl

“As Full House actress Lori Loughlin and her husband await their next court date, they stand accused of paying a $500,000 bribe to get their daughters into the University of Southern California as crew team recruits. Their defense is said to rest on the belief that they were making a perfectly legal donation to the university and its athletic teams (their children never rowed a competitive race in their lives).

“Legal strategies and moral considerations aside, this strange behavior has left many observers wondering, ‘What were they thinking?’ Surely, Loughlin and her family must have considered someone at the university would audit the admissions records or realize the coach’s high-profile recruits had never rowed a boat.

“We may never know exactly what Loughlin and her family were thinking. But as a physician who has studied how perception alters behavior, I believe that to understand what compelled them to do something so foolish, a more relevant question would be, ‘What were they perceiving?’”

Read this article at VOX in its entirety, click here.

“Do You Wish Your Doctor Understood Trauma? (Help Me Inform Medicine About ACEs With Your Vote + Free ACE Fact Sheet)” – ACEs Connection

ACEs

by Veronica Mead, M.D.

“The most common reactions I get when I mention the word ‘trauma’ to other people with chronic illness are shame, fear or rage that stem from having been told – by our society, by a doctor, by a family member or friend or coworker – that it means symptoms are all in their heads.

“I still regularly read or hear from people with chronic diseases of all kinds that their physicians, nursing staff or other health care professionals have disbelieved or belittled them, or whispered behind their backs that they were faking their symptoms or their need for help with basics like walking, eating or getting to the bathroom.

“This culture of judgement is especially common for people with difficult-to-diagnose, invisible or mysterious illnesses such as my own disease, which is chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS).

“Yet it happens to people with well-established, respected and objectively diagnosable conditions all the time too.”

Read this article in its entirety, click here.

“76 billion opioid pills: Newly released federal data unmasks the epidemic” – The Washington Post

opioids“The data in the DEA database tracks the path of every single pain pill sold in the United States, including oxycodone, above. (John Moore/Getty Images)”

by Scott HighamSari Horwitz Steven Rich

“America’s largest drug companies saturated the country with 76 billion oxycodone and hydrocodone pain pills from 2006 through 2012 as the nation’s deadliest drug epidemic spun out of control, according to previously undisclosed company data released as part of the largest civil action in U.S. history.

“The information comes from a database maintained by the Drug Enforcement Administration that tracks the path of every single pain pill sold in the United States — from manufacturers and distributors to pharmacies in every town and city. The data provides an unprecedented look at the surge of legal pain pills that fueled the prescription opioid epidemic, which has resulted in nearly 100,000 deaths from 2006 through 2012.

“Just six companies distributed 75 percent of the pills during this period: McKesson Corp., Walgreens, Cardinal Health, AmerisourceBergen, CVS and Walmart, according to an analysis of the database by The Washington Post. Three companies manufactured 88 percent of the opioids: SpecGx, a subsidiary of Mallinckrodt; ­Actavis Pharma; and Par Pharmaceutical, a subsidiary of Endo Pharmaceuticals.”

Read this Washington Post article in its entirety, click here.

 

“The United States of Elder Fraud – How Prevalent is Elder Financial Abuse in Each State?” – comparitech

USA-elder-fraud

by Paul Bischoff

“The vast majority of elder fraud cases in the US go unreported. Our research team set out to uncover the true cost of elder fraud in the US by analyzing and extrapolating data from government reports and registries.

“Comparitech estimates 5 million cases of elder fraud occur in the US annually resulting in $27.4 billion in losses.

“Elder fraud, also called elder financial abuse or elder financial exploitation, is defined as the misappropriation or abuse of financial control in a relationship where there is an expectation of trust, resulting in harm to the elderly victim.

“More than 200,000 scams and financial abuse cases targeting the elderly are reported to authorities every year, and most experts agree that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Our estimates show $1.17 billion in damages are reported to authorities, but the real figure likely dwarfs that amount when factoring in unreported elder fraud.

“To calculate the full scope of the problem, Comparitech aggregated data from multiple studies on elder fraud in every US state, including the number of reports to authorities and average loss per case. We then used those numbers to estimate the total number of cases and total damages in each state, adjusted for the proportion of unreported cases.”

Click here to read the report and read this article at comparitech in its entirety here.