Author Archive: berkslancasterlebanonlink

“5 Ways For Seniors To Protect Themselves From Online Misinformation” – NPR

seniors misinformation

“You’ve probably come across a piece of bad information online, and you might not even know it. The virus was not created in a lab as a bioweapon, for instance, and inhaling hot air from a hair dryer is not a cure.

“Experts say this outbreak may be the biggest source of Internet misinformation … ever.

“Life Kit wants to help.”


by Amy Yee

‘Online misinformation is a serious threat, from fake cures for COVID-19 to false information on voting eligibility.

“Seniors are especially at risk. People over 65 were more likely to share false or misleading content on Facebook during the 2016 presidential campaign, according to one study from researchers at Princeton and New York University. Older adults were also exposed to more misinformation on Twitter during that election.

“Seniors should learn about avoiding misinformation — to protect themselves, and because they are civically active. Over half of poll workers were ages 61 and older in the 2018 U.S. general election, according to Pew Research Center. And older voters in the U.S. are also consistently more likely to vote than younger groups.

“A scientific study published in the journal Nature in March 2021 found that many people shared misinformation on social media because they did not pay close attention to the content. They were less likely to share misinformation after being asked to assess the accuracy of news headlines. Simply taking more time to evaluate sources can go a long way.”

Click here to see “more tips to defuse misinformation and disinformation:”


SOURCE: NPR

“New Device Taps Brain Signals To Help Stroke Patients Regain Hand Function” – NPR

post stroke

“A woman demonstrates the IpsiHand rehabilitation device for stroke patients.” – NeuroLutions

by Jon Hamilton

“People recovering from a stroke will soon have access to a device that can help restore a disabled hand.

“The Food And Drug Administration has authorized a device called IpsiHand, which uses signals from the uninjured side of a patient’s brain to help rewire circuits controlling the hand, wrist and arm.

“The device can be used at home and offers stroke patients “an additional treatment option to help them move their hands and arms again,” said Dr. Christopher Loftus of the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health in a statement.

“IpsiHand’s authorization comes after the FDA reviewed results on patients like Mark Forrest, who had a stroke in 2015.

“‘We called 911 and off to the hospital I went,’ Forrest, who lives near St. Louis with his wife, Patti. ‘By the time I got there most of my right side was paralyzed.’

“After six months of rehabilitation, Forrest was walking again, but still had little control over his right hand. He struggled to pull on socks and button shirts.”

Keep reading this article at National Public Radio, click here.

“Mysteries of Mental Illness” | a special WITF event

mysteries of mental illness

“Explore the story of mental illness in science and society, tracing the evolution of this complex topic from its earliest days to present times. Join WITF for a free documentary screening and panel discussion around Mysteries of Mental Illness Monday, June 21 at 7pm. Watch selected clips of Mysteries of Mental Illness, followed by a panel discussion exploring the topic with local experts.

“The four-part series examines the dramatic attempts across generations to unravel the mysteries of mental illness and give voice to contemporary Americans across a spectrum of experiences.”

WITF (public broadcasting) Monday, June 21 at 7pm

Click here to register

“Hunger Awareness Month: Food assistance is available to keep Pennsylvanians fed, healthy” – PA Department of Human Services

HUNGER AWARENESS MONTH

Food Assistance is Available to Keep Pennsylvanians Fed, Healthy

hunger awareness month

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), 12 percent of the U.S. population has limited access to nutritious food. Hunger can impact your health and wellbeing throughout your life, work performance, and the rate that children learn and grow. It is imperative that we reduce hunger and promote good health by ensuring that Pennsylvanians are able to access to fresh, healthy food as well as health and nutrition information and education.

In recognition of National Hunger Awareness Month in June, the Department of Human Services is highlighting some of the food and nutrition programs available for children, adults, and seniors in Pennsylvania. Check out some of the programs available; click here.

 

“Know the signs of elder abuse and how to get help” – National Institute on Aging

The mistreatment of older adults can be by family members, strangers, health care providers, caregivers, or friends. Abuse can happen to any older adult, but often affects those who depend on others for help with activities of everyday life. Learn how to recognize some of the signs of elder abuse so you can step in and help. For example, you may notice that the older adult:

  • Seems depressed, confused, or withdrawn
  • Appears dirty, underfed, or dehydrated
  • Has unexplained bruises, burns, cuts, or scars
  • Has unpaid bills or recent changes in banking or spending patterns 

elder abuse spotting the signs

 

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JOIN THE 7-DAY WORLD PREMIERE: The Wisdom of Trauma

trauma

wisdom of trauma

JOIN THE 7-DAY WORLD PREMIERE – LIVE With Dr. Gabor Maté & Expert Guest Speakers

Now through JUNE 14

“Trauma is the invisible force that shapes our lives. It shapes the way we live, the way we love and the way we make sense of the world. It is the root of our deepest wounds.  Dr. Maté gives us a new vision: a trauma-informed society in which parents, teachers, physicians, policy-makers and legal personnel are not concerned with fixing behaviors, making diagnoses, suppressing symptoms and judging, but seek instead to understand the sources from which troubling behaviors and diseases spring in the wounded human soul.

* With this film, we hope to touch many people, begin a conversation, and develop a common understanding about how trauma impacts our individual lives, communities and society as a whole.*


Watch the movie trailer here and sign up below for access to the FULL movie premiere, a 7-day expert trauma series with Dr. Gabor Maté, and a free Trauma Guide. You will be asked to make a small donation to support the movie and movement*.

“Spreading vaccine fears. And cashing in. | Meet the influencers making millions by dealing doubt about the coronavirus vaccines.” – Public Integrity

spreading vaccine fearsGraphic: Adam Niklewicz for the Center for Public Integrity

by Liz Essley Whyte – This story was published in partnership with HuffPost. 

“Heather Simpson never thought to question vaccines. Her parents vaccinated her when she was a child, and she got tetanus and flu shots as an adult.

“But when she and her husband were thinking about starting a family, she saw an ad for the documentary series ‘The Truth about Vaccines,’ and ‘fear crept in,’ she later wrote.

“Simpson paid about $200 for the series, which taught her the tenets of vaccine skepticism.

“’I left that docuseries just thinking this is it. This is how autism happens. This is how allergies happen,’ the 30-year-old Texan said. ‘How else would it happen?’

“When her daughter was born in 2017, Simpson decided not to immunize her. She began posting on social media about her vaccine fears. She then went viral in 2019 for uploading a photo of her Halloween costume of, as she put it, ‘the least scary thing she could think of — the measles.’

“Scientists widely agree vaccines prevent dangerous diseases and do not cause autism or allergies. But in a few years Simpson had gone from accepting that consensus to preaching against it. And it all started with the documentary series made by Tennessee couple Ty and Charlene Bollinger, who got their start by questioning mainstream cancer treatments such as chemotherapy.”

You can read the rest of this long read (or listen to it) at Public Integrity – click here.

“FDA approves much-debated Alzheimer’s drug panned by experts” – AP

“The drug carries a warning about temporary brain swelling that can sometimes cause headaches, confusion and dizziness. Other side effects included allergic reactions, diarrhea and disorientation.”

alz medPhoto source: Pixabay

by Matthew Perrone

WASHINGTON (AP) — “Government health officials on Monday approved the first new drug for Alzheimer’s disease in nearly 20 years, disregarding warnings from independent advisers that the much-debated treatment hasn’t been shown to help slow the brain-destroying disease.

“The Food and Drug Administration approved the drug from Biogen based on study results showing it seemed ‘reasonably likely’ to benefit Alzheimer’s patients. It’s the only therapy that U.S. regulators have said can likely treat the underlying disease, rather than manage symptoms like anxiety and insomnia.

“The decision, which could impact millions of Americans and their families, is certain to spark disagreements among physicians, medical researchers and patient groups. It also has far-reaching implications for the standards used to evaluate experimental therapies, including those that show only incremental benefits.

“The new drug, which Biogen developed with Japan’s Eisai Co., did not reverse mental decline, only slowing it in one study. The medication, aducanumab, will be marketed as Aduhelm and is to be given as an infusion every four weeks.

“Dr. Caleb Alexander, an FDA adviser who recommended against the drug’s approval, said he was ‘surprised and disappointed’ by the decision.

“”The FDA gets the respect that it does because it has regulatory standards that are based on firm evidence. In this case, I think they gave the product a pass,’ said Alexander, a medical researcher at Johns Hopkins University.”

Read this article at the Associated Press in its entirety, click here.

“Opinion piece: Lessons from a Job Search” – Age Equity Alliance

older worker

“Author Dan Saffer provides some well-needed advice for job-hunters entering the fray. From the ageist attitudes in the tech industry to the importance of a well-maintained portfolio, Saffer encourages all to keep their heads high when the search can feel stressful.”

agesim

by Dan Saffer

“Note: I didn’t really want to write this article, but am doing so at others’ urging hoping it’ll give other job hunters some hope, some insights, or at least a laugh.

“There’s an idea held by many that the more experienced you are, the more accomplished you are, the better your network, the easier it is to find a job. I’m here to debunk this. I have 20+ years of experience, 10+ years in design management, a master’s degree in design from a great school, a seemingly good reputation, and my last role was at a high-profile company. Still, I was ghosted, given take-home design exercises, was told job offers were coming that never materialized, given ‘personality quizzes’ that I apparently didn’t pass, and suffered the same sorts of indignities during my exhaustive search for a new role.

“For about eight months, I hunted for a job. Unlike the last time I was out of work, I had no trouble landing interviews.” 

Read this opinion column in its entirety, click here.

“Why getting more people with disabilities developing technology is good for everyone” – The Conversation

blind“Accessible technology is better for everyone, and accessible technology benefits when the people who rely on it most help build it.” Chris So/Toronto Star via Getty Images

by Kristen Shinohara and Garreth Tigwell

“Unless you’re blind or know someone who is, you might not know that blind people use the same smartphones as sighted people. In fact, many blind people use touch-screen smartphones every day. The secret is that smartphones have a screen reader, a tool that allows blind people to use a mix of gestures and taps, along with vibrations or audio feedback, to use their apps.

“Screen readers work on desktop computers as well as mobile devices. You can usually find the screen reader in settings under accessibility. On iPhones the screen reader is VoiceOver. It provides a verbal description of what’s on the screen, including buttons to click and other actions available to the user. A well-designed website or app user interface makes the information on the website or app accessible to the screen reader, which makes it accessible to blind users. However, a badly designed website or application will be rendered invisible to a screen reader.

“We are researchers who focus on technology design that is usable for people with all kinds of disabilities. We’ve found that more needs to be done to make technology accessible and inclusive, such as improving design tools so they are accessible to screen reader users.”

Read this article at The Conversation in its entirety, click here.