Category Archives: Addiction

Pennsylvanians will soon have a new way to connect to mental or behavioral health crisis services! 988

SUPPORT GROUP- Family Connections

SUPPORT GROUP- Family Connections- a Virtual group for parents/caregivers who support Loved ones facing Substance Abuse and/or Mental Health challenges!
1st Thursday of the Month at 1:30 pm Easter Time
Join us for Family Connections – a virtual community for parents and caregivers who support loved ones facing substance use and/or mental health challenges.We meet on the first Thursday of every month from 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. ET.Monthly gatherings will focus on a specific topic, provide tips and tools, and offer the opportunity to network with other families.Learn More and Register HereJoin us for our discussion topic “Families Managing System Navigation” on Thursday, June 2 from 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. ET.Stay tuned for a description and presenter information to be added soon!Moderators: Gail Cormier, Lachelle Wade-Freeman
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Email pasocdianna@gmail.com for Information!

CSG Psych Rehab Recovery Picnic – May 25

alcoholism & treatment methods 

Save the Date: Addictions Conference 2022

Topics in Addiction

March is National Problem Gambling Awareness Month

March is National Problem Gambling Awareness Month (PGAM), sponsored by the National Council on Problem Gambling.  Problem gambling is any gambling behavior that creates problems in a person’s life. Approximately 4-6 million adults in the United States deal with problem gambling while an additional 1-2 million reach the diagnostic level of Disordered Gambling.   From traditional casinos to video games and sports betting, gambling is a landscape that is constantly shifting. It is important to stay up to date with training on how best to prevent problem gambling in people of all ages. It is also important to show that recovery is possible and that there are treatment options available for those suffering with problem gambling.   
In recognition of Problem Gambling Awareness Month, Compass Mark is hosting lunch and learn webinars throughout March. I invite you to join us for these timely and important topics in gambling prevention.   ·   

March 7 – 12:00pm-1:00pm: Problem Gambling in an Aging Population ·   
March 14 – 12:00pm-1:00pm: Loot Boxes: What are they and how do they impact adolescents? ·   
March 21 – 12:00pm-1:00pm: Sports Gambling and Daily Fantasy Sports ·   
March 28 – 12:00pm-1:00pm: Trends in Gambling and Where we go from Here!  

For more information, or to register for the webinars, check out the local events calendar on our website Regional Trainings & Other Events – Compass Mark. 

“Former addict shares message of hope after college graduation: ‘Stop selling yourself short'” – Today.com

“Virginia Burton spent most of her life in and out of jail. In May, she graduated from the University of Washington after receiving a scholarship in 2020.”

former addict

“How about that for motivation? I honestly thought I’d die on a park bench with a needle in my arm or by gunshot to the head. I would’ve never in a million years thought my life would look the way it does today.

“Stop selling yourself short. You don’t know what tomorrow might bring so you might consider starting today.” #wedorecover #dudeicantevenbelieveit

by Rachel Paula Abrahamson

“Virginia “Ginny” Burton was 6 years old when she was introduced to marijuana by her drug-addicted mother. At the age of 12, she was using crystal meth. By 14, Burton, a student in an accelerated learning program, had dropped out of school and was smoking crack.

“’I went from being a really sweet kid to an angry and aggressive one,’ Burton, 48, told TODAY Health. ‘I didn’t want to be in a classroom. I just wanted to get high.’

“Burton found herself bouncing from one juvenile detention facility to the next. By 2012, Burton, a mom of three, was homeless, addicted to heroin and had served multiple prison sentences. Her children were taken away.

“’My kids would grab my ankles when I went into the kitchen because that’s where I smoked crack,’ Burton revealed. ‘My life was a nightmare.’

“But it’s not anymore.”

Click here to read this absolutely fascinating and riveting article in its entirety at today.com.

 

“Age Segregation, Loneliness and Addiction: Why Aren’t We Connecting the Dots?” – next avenue

“12-step programs reduce all three. What can we learn from them?”

combat lonliness

by Sarah McKinney Gibson

“On March 23, 2021, Dr. Vivek H. Murthy was confirmed as the Surgeon General of the

For the past 11 years, I have been an active member of multiple 12-step programs. In meetings that take place in church basements and over Zoom, I have seen people from different generations and backgrounds come together to heal from loneliness and addiction. 

“Millions of us are finding help in society’s shadows. Much could be learned from undertaking a national research study aimed at better understanding what happens in 12-step programs, and how they not only heal loneliness and addiction but bridge generational divides. 

“During the pandemic — a time of strict generational separation — loneliness, alcohol consumption and drug use have all spiked. Murthy, a Next Avenue Influencer in Aging, is well positioned to connect the dots and seek solutions in unlikely places. Like 12-step programs, originated by Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) in the 1930s.”

Keep reading this article at next avenue; click here.

 

“Sharp, ‘Off The Charts’ Rise In Alcoholic Liver Disease Among Young Women.” – NPR

alcohol

by Yuki Naguchi

“For many years, Jessica Duenas led what she calls a double life. She was the first in her immigrant family to go to college. In 2019, she won Kentucky’s Teacher of the Year award. That same year, Duenas typically downed nearly a liter of liquor every night.

“By the time she was 34, she was diagnosed with alcoholic hepatitis, a serious inflammation of her liver that doctors warned could could soon lead to irreversible scarring and even death if she didn’t didn’t stop drinking, and quickly.

“‘I couldn’t keep down any food,” Duenas says. ‘My belly was supersensitive, like if I pressed on certain parts of it, it would hurt a lot. My eyes were starting to get yellowish.’

“Cases of alcoholic liver disease — which includes milder fatty liver and the permanent scarring of cirrhosis, as well as alcoholic hepatitis — are up 30% over the last year at the University of Michigan’s health system, says Dr. Jessica Mellinger, a liver specialist there.

“The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has not yet compiled data on any overall increase in severe cases of alcoholic liver disease since the pandemic began. But, Mellinger says, ‘in my conversations with my colleagues at other institutions, everybody is saying the same thing: “Yep, it’s astronomical. It’s just gone off the charts.”‘”

Read this article at NPR in its entirety, click here.