Category Archives: Addiction

“The opioid crisis and grandparents raising grandchildren” – US Census Bureau

grandparents

by Lydia Anderson

“In the wake of the opioid epidemic that was declared a public health crisis in 2017, there has been increasing concern about what happens to the children of parents with substance abuse disorders who may be unable to care for their children.

“New Census Bureau research shows that grandparents may sometimes step in to care for these children.

“The percentage of the population age 30 and over who are raising grandchildren is higher in states that have higher opioid prescribing rates, according to a new working paper, entitled “The Opioid Prescribing Rate and Grandparents Raising Grandchildren: State and County Level Analysis.”

Continue reading this article, click here.

“Opioid Abuse and Seniors” – ForeverYoung.org

by Judith A. Rucki

“If you think the opioid epidemic is only affecting younger folks, think again. According to a report in Psychiatric Times, while opioid use disorders are more common in younger patients, ‘prevalence among the elderly is growing, and misuse poses unique risks in the geriatric population.’

The informational web guide Addiction Center concurs. ‘Drug and alcohol abuse among the elderly is a rapidly growing health problem in the United States.’ Adding, ‘Seventeen percent of people in the United States over 65 years old have abused prescription medications, according to the Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services.’

“The Center on Addiction states, ‘A growing number of older Americans are becoming addicted to prescription opioid drugs like OxyContin and Vicodin. While drug-related deaths have increased dramatically in all age groups, the greatest percentage increase has been among adults ages fifty-five to sixty-four.’

“So, what can we do to protect our loved ones and ourselves from falling victim to this epidemic? We can start by acquainting ourselves with potential triggers for addiction in our senior population.” Click here to continue reading this article at ForeverYoung.com. 


Below is an extraction of a 2017 article at Medium.com describing opioid addiction in a Pennsylvania County. The article reinforces the impact of opioid addiction on “more and more senior citizens.”


“Yet, it’s not just the county’s youngest who are most vulnerable to the secondary threats of the opioid crisis.

Opioids’ oldest victims

“More and more Butler County senior citizens are being robbed of their golden years, and the sinister secondary threats of the opioid crisis are increasingly to blame.

“So said the county’s Area Agency on Aging Director Beth Herold, speaking at a county-wide opioid coalition meeting this fall.

“The opioid epidemic’s threat to Butler County’s oldest residents comes in many forms.

“Above all, their lives are at stake.

addiction

“In area where prescription opioids remain abundant, older people remain at risk of accidentally overdosing on the very medication designed to ease their pain. Indeed, overdose deaths recorded here have touched virtually every demographic, including those 60 and up, the county coroner reported.

“Other threats to seniors from the opioid crisis are much more subtle, unsuspecting, even sinister. Continue reading →

Friday Wrap-Up, January 25, 2019 | a message from the Secretary of Aging

Each week the Office of the Secretary of Pennsylvania’s Department of Aging releases a Friday newsletter with information relevant to activities, issues and events for older Pennsylvanians and persons with disabilities across the Commonwealth.

 

Click here to download the newsletter as a .pdf file.

Overdose deaths are soaring among women over 30

drug overdoses

“Drug overdose deaths among women ages 30 to 64 are soaring, according to a new CDC analysis of data from 1999 to 2017. Here’s a look at the findings:

  • The drug data: The rate of drug overdose deaths involving any opioid rose 492 percent during that time. Deaths involving heroin rose 915 percent; benzodiazepines 830 percent; cocaine 285 percent; and antidepressants 176 percent.
  • The age breakdown: Overdose deaths climbed most dramatically — nearly 500 percent — among women ages 55 to 64. In 2017, overdose deaths rates were highest among women ages 50 to 54.
  • The takeaway: “Overdose deaths continue to be unacceptably high, and targeted efforts are needed to reduce the number of deaths in this evolving epidemic, including those among middle-aged women,” the authors write.

SOURCE: STAT | Morning Rounds

Drug Overdose Deaths Among Women Aged 30–64 Years — United States, 1999–2017

“What’s behind our appetite for self-destruction?” – The Conversation

addictive“There seems be an attractive quality to things that are ostensibly unhealthy or dangerous.” Alisusha/Shutterstock.com

“Each new year, people vow to put an end to self-destructive habits like smoking, overeating or overspending.

“And how many times have we learned of someone – a celebrity, a friend or a loved one – who committed some self-destructive act that seemed to defy explanation? Think of the criminal who leaves a trail of evidence, perhaps with the hope of getting caught, or the politician who wins an election, only to start sexting someone likely to expose him.

“Why do they do it?”

Click here to continue reading this Conversation article about the nature of destructive behaviors.

 

“A visual journey through addiction” – The New York Times

addiction 2PHOTO: Center on Addiction.org

THE FINAL TRAP of addiction is laid when you muster the courage to stop. You may not even realize you are physically dependent until you experience withdrawal for the first time.

“There might be crippling pain, vomiting, insomnia, spasms, hot and cold flashes, goosebumps, congestion and tears. All this on top of debilitating anxiety and depression.

“You might feel like you’re having the worst flu of your life, or like a demon is crawling out of your skin.

“This misery could last for weeks.

“Dying from withdrawal is uncommon, but it doesn’t feel that way at the time. These harsh symptoms can make quitting seem impossible.” 

Click here to read and experience the “A visual journey through addiction” at The New York Times

 

Friday Wrap-Up, December 14, 2018 | a message from the Secretary of Aging

Each week the Office of the Secretary of Pennsylvania’s Department of Aging releases a Friday newsletter with information relevant to activities, issues and events for older Pennsylvanians and persons with disabilities across the Commonwealth..

Click here download the newsletter as a .pdf file.

 

“Pennsylvania sees significant rise in heroin overdoses among people 55 and older” – The Morning Call

older overdoses“More and more older Pennsylvanians are hospitalized for heroin overdoses, according to a state report released Wednesday.” (Spencer Platt / Getty Images)

by Binghui Huang, Contact Reporter of The Morning Call

“A survey released Wednesday shows a troubling rise in the number of Pennsylvanians 55 and older being hospitalized for heroin overdoses, an increase that several public health officials linked to the deadly opioid epidemic sweeping the state.

“But, they cautioned, additional study needs to be done to explain why more older adults are resorting to heroin.

“According to the survey by the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council, the heroin overdose hospitalization rate among those 55 and older increased 36 percent from 2016 to 2017, the greatest increase of any age group.”

Click here to read this Morning Call article in its entirety.

October 01 – Suicide Prevention & Awareness Day at the Capitol

suicide day at the capitol

www.preventsuicide.org

“Child pornography may make a comeback after court ruling guts regulations protecting minors” – The Conversation

court ruling porn“The porn industry has long placed an emphasis on young girls. Reuters/Russell Boyce”

“A federal appeals court judge just made it a lot easier for the pornography industry to abuse and exploit children for profit.

“The Aug. 3 legal decision, which has received far less media attention that it deserves, represents the most significant blow to opponents of child porn in decades. We believe it could lead to a sharp increase in the number of underage performers being exploited due to the removal of legal oversight and penalties for uploading or distributing images that feature minors.

“We’ve been studying the business of porn for years, as scholars, advocates and experts in legal battles. In fact, we provided expert testimony in 2013 in a related court case and endured two hours of grilling from the judge and porn industry lawyers.

“The industry is now celebrating its landmark victory.”

Click here to read this article in its entirety at The Conversation.