Category Archives: Aging in place

“Your Top 10 Objects Your Kids Don’t Want” – next avenue

What-to-Do-With-the-10-Objects-Your-Kids-Dont-Want_94280034-750x485

“Your house, and what it contains, is a minefield in the eyes of your grown children. They can see from your example that collections of stuff are a curse; such objects are superfluous to a life well lived. They want a clean, clear field in which to live their lives. Your grown children will not agree to be the recipients of your downsizing if it means their upsizing.

“In the following list of the Top Ten Objects Your Kids Do Not Want — inspired by conversations (or lack thereof) about my keepsakes with my 30-year-old son, Lock, and his wife, as well as by similar conversations I’ve had with hundreds of boomer clients and their millennial heirs — I will help you find a remedy for dealing with each:”

Click here to see the top 10 list and what you might consider doing to help your kids.

“A pioneering doctor tries to upend the nursing home industry — and give seniors back their independence” – STATnews

Center for Growing MINKA Cottage REIS_D20171002JR1The creator of the Minka bristles at the notion that this is a tiny house. ‘Tiny houses are terrible for older people,’ says Dr. Bill Thomas. Jon Reis

“KING FERRY, N.Y. — It’s an unlikely place to launch a war against the nursing home industry.

“But here on the black-stone edge of a gloomy Cayuga Lake stood the pioneering geriatrician Dr. Bill Thomas, a few feet away from his weapon of choice in this battle: a 330-square-foot, plywood-boned home he calls a Minka.

“‘I spent my career trying to change the nursing home industry,’ he said. ‘But I’ve come to realize it’s not really going to change. So now what I’ve got to do is make it so people don’t need nursing homes in the first place. That what this is about.’

“The idea sounds, in one sense, simple: create and market small, senior-friendly houses like this one and sell them for around $75,000, clustered like mushrooms in tight groups or tucked onto a homeowner’s existing property so caregivers or children can occupy the larger house and help when needed.

“Thomas wants to help people grow older on their own turf and terms, while helping spare them the fiscal and physical stress of maintaining bigger homes.”

Read this STATnews article in its entirety, click here.

Attendant Care / Act 150

If you have a physical disability, the Attendant Care Waiver and state funded Act 150 program may be available to you to continue to live in your home and community with support and services.

act 150To download the above graphic as a .pdf format for enlarging, printing or sharing, click on the graphic or here: Act 150.

LEARN MORE HERE | Eligibility details, application forms and other information are available here.

 

“‘Crisis mode’: As boomers age, a shortage of caregivers” – The Baltimore Sun

caregivers“Open Arms Solutions caregiver Kamlesh Debi, left, brings a slice of pie to Frank Shapira, 91, right, Monday, Nov. 20, 2017 at Shapira’s Skokie apartment, where he receives 24-hour home health care.” (Chris Walker / Chicago Tribune)”

by Robert Channick, Contact Reporter Chicago Tribune

“As more and more baby boomers cross the threshold into old age, members of the Me Generation are confronting a growing problem: Who will take care of them when they can no longer care for themselves?

“It’s a situation few families are prepared for, but one many will face. As relatives gather for the holidays, it often becomes clear that falls, memory lapses and an assortment of maladies have taken a toll on aging loved ones and help is needed.

“But a shortage of qualified workers, rising costs and a massive demographic shift have newly minted seniors facing a caregiver crisis that could take some of the luster out of their golden years.”

Read this article in its entirety, click here.

“Good Friends Might Be Your Best Brain Booster As You Age” – Kaiser Health News

by Judith Graham

“Ask Edith Smith, a proud 103-year-old, about her friends, and she’ll give you an earful.

Two Senior Women Playing Dominoes At Day Care Centre

“There’s Johnetta, 101, whom she’s known for 70 years and who has Alzheimer’s disease. ‘I call her every day and just say I just say, “Hi, how are you doing?” She never knows, but she says hi back, and I tease her,’ Smith said.

“There’s Katie, 93, whom Smith met during a long teaching career with the Chicago Public Schools. ‘Every day we have a good conversation. She’s still driving and lives in her own house, and she tells me what’s going on.’

“Then there’s Rhea, 90, whom Smith visits regularly at a retirement facility. And Mary, 95, who doesn’t leave her house anymore, ‘so I fix her a basket about once a month of jelly and little things I make and send it over by cab.’ And fellow residents at Smith’s Chicago senior community, whom she recognizes with a card and a treat on their birthdays.”

You can read this Kaiser Health News article in its entirety, click here.

Technology | Meet the grandPad

“Technology has become fully integrated into our daily lives; smart phones, tablets, laptops, and other devices connect us to the world at large and allow us to share in the lives of our close friends and family. Seniors across the globe have tried with varying success to embrace technology to stay in touch with loved ones and perform basic functions at home.

“Tablet devices, with their array of options, menus, and applications, can prove too difficult for most seniors to effectively use. As such, many companies have developed tablets designed specifically for seniors as a way to boost revenue and reach this key demographic. But are these tablets really worth the investment? This infographic from grandPad helps highlight key features of the grandPad tablet, other senior tablets, and the standard tablets on the market.

We’re sharing this link and infographic received in an email from next avenue. This is not an endorsement but is shared in the interest of information sharing.

“Not only do Next Avenue readers get a special discount, but for every grandPad sold using the code nextave, grandPad will make a contribution to Next Avenue that helps support our non-profit journalism.”

The Annual Plan (regularly $65.50)$49 /month – billed upfront annually.

“In-Home Care Helps Seniors Manage Diabetes | November Is American Diabetes Month – Caring Right At Home

diabetes“Today, almost 30 million people in America are living with diabetes. Diabetes is actually a group of diseases; the most common by far is type 2 diabetes, in which the body has trouble using insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar. The older we get, the more likely we are to develop type 2 diabetes.

“Doctors know that managing diabetes in older adults can be a tricky balancing act. If a senior’s blood sugar is too high, they can suffer damage to their heart, kidneys, nerves, eyes, bones and feet. Diabetes can lead to blindness, amputations and even death. Diabetes raises the risk of stroke, and causes problems with thinking and memory by decreasing the flow of blood in the brain.

“On the other hand, if a senior is taking too much medication, this can lead to hypoglycemia — blood sugar that is too low, which can cause dizziness, loss of consciousness, confusion, personality changes and falls. So, the doctor will carefully monitor a senior’s blood sugar and adjust the dosage of medications accordingly.”

Read this article in its entirety at Caring Right At Home, click here.

 

“The Ethics of Adjusting Your Assets to Qualify for Medicaid” – a column at The New York Times

medicaid

Credit Robert Neubecker for The New York Times

by Ron Lieber

“At any given moment, there is a large group of citizens who want nothing more than to make absolutely certain that they are impoverished enough to qualify for Medicaid sooner rather than later. Someday, you might be one of them.

“Welcome to the (perfectly legal) world of Medicaid planning, the plain-vanilla term for the mini-industry of lawyers and others who help people arrange their financial lives so they don’t spend every last dime on a nursing home. Once properly impoverished under the law, then Medicaid, which gets funding both from your state and the federal government, picks up the tab.

“Whatever twists and turns the health insurance debates in Washington take, Medicaid will be at the center, and the program will probably affect you and your family more than you know. After all, if you run out of money in retirement, it is Medicaid that pays for most of your nursing home or home-based care.”

Click here to continue reading this column at The New York Times.

“How Well Do We Age in the U.S.? Check Our Scores” – next avenue

“An aging index compares health, equality and social cohesion among countries.”


Aging-Index

by Judith Graham

“The U.S. has a long way to go in becoming a truly age-friendly society, according to a new international scorecard — the most comprehensive assessment to date of how nations across the world are responding to their aging populations.

“Results were released last month at the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics’ World Congress in San Francisco.

“The United States performed well, overall. With a score of 59.8 (out of a possible 100), it came in third of 18 countries for which composite scores were compiled, behind Norway (with a score of 65) and Sweden (with a score of 62).

“Hungary brought up the rear (at 23.5), followed by Poland (at 31.4) and Estonia (33.3).

“Many improvements needed

“Still, striking areas of weakness are highlighted in the analysis: rates of poverty among older adults in the U.S. are high; income inequality is pronounced; public expenditures for long-term care are low; tension between older and younger generations is palpable and healthy life expectancy is below that of several other nations.”

Click here to continue reading this next avenue article.

“Self-reliant older baby boomers are now better-connected to goods, services and care” – American Society on Aging

self reliant senior

by Stephen W. Golant

“It is fair to surmise that the 100,000 young people in their late teens and twenties who converged in San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury neighborhood to participate in the 1967 Summer of Love were not especially tuned in to how their grandparents were coping with getting old. It is even less likely that these young baby boomers thought much about their own old age. This socially rebellious group, which rejected middle-class values and parental controls, and who romanticized communal living, could hardly imagine that in their old age they would end up living in cul-de-sac suburbs and traveling in their cars to regional malls to buy furnishings for their single-family detached dwellings.

“With their anti-government sentiments, they could hardly have foreseen how important Social Security and Medicare would become for their future health and financial well-being. Yet perhaps they were well-advised not to look to their grandparents as exemplars on how to live in old age. If they had been aware in the late 1960s of the challenges of dealing with old age, they may well have carried signs calling for ‘no more nursing homes for the old.’

“Fast forward five decades, and these now aging baby boomers are still showing their independent spirits. They are opting to age in place for as long as possible, even as these residential decisions clash with the opinions of many experts who argue that the baby boomers’ current dwellings are designed for the young and are unequipped to accommodate those individuals who suffer from physical and activity limitations, chronic health problems, and social losses.”

Continue reading this article in its entirety here.