Category Archives: Aging

“Survey: 80% of Older Adults Have Faced Ageism” – Futurity

“Most older adults say they’ve experienced ageism, but a majority still hold positive attitudes toward aging, a new poll finds.”

ageismSHUTTERSTOCK/NEMANJAMISCEVIC

by Kara Gavin

“An offhand remark by an acquaintance about using a smartphone. A joke about someone losing their memory or hearing. An ad in a magazine focused on erasing wrinkles or gray hair. An inner worry that getting older means growing lonely.

“All of these kinds of everyday ageism, and many more, are common in the lives of Americans over 50, a new poll finds. In fact, more than 80% of those polled say they commonly experience at least one form of ageism in their day-to-day lives.

“The poll even shows relationships between experiencing multiple forms of everyday ageism and health. In all, 40% of all poll respondents said they routinely experience three or more forms of ageism—and these older adults were much more likely to have poor mental and physical health.”

Read this article at Futurity.com in its entirety, click here.

 

 

“What Seniors Should Know Before Going Ahead With Elective Procedures” – Kaiser Health News

Doctor explaining x-ray report to patient(DigitalVision/Getty Images)

by Judith Graham

“For months, Patricia Merryweather-Arges, a health care expert, has fielded questions about the coronavirus pandemic from fellow Rotary Club members in the Midwest.

“Recently people have wondered ‘Is it safe for me to go see my doctor? Should I keep that appointment with my dentist? What about that knee replacement I put on hold: Should I go ahead with that?’

“These are pressing concerns as hospitals, outpatient clinics and physicians’ practices have started providing elective medical procedures — services that had been suspended for several months.

“Late last month, KFF reported that 48% of adults had skipped or postponed medical care because of the pandemic. Physicians are deeply concerned about the consequences, especially for people with serious illnesses or chronic medical conditions.”

Read this article at Kaiser Family Foundation in its entirety here.

 

WEBINAR: The Joy of Animals

Mark this date and time on your calendar: Wednesday, July 22, 1:00 to 2:30 pm. Join Link partners, Karen Greth, Meagan Good and Chris Hainley as they introduce you to special animal friends of theirs during this Webinar presentation.

Our special presenters (human and animal) will be sharing ideas and examples of the ways animals help fight social isolation, loneliness, anxiety and other emotional and out-of-normal feelings. COVID-19 and the resulting stay-at-home orders have changed everything except the joy that animals bring to people.

joy of animals draft

Human Presenters:

  • Karen Greth, K-PETS – Keystone Pet Enhanced Therapy Services
  • Meagan Good, Take Heart Counseling & Equine Assisted Therapy 
  • Chris Hainley, Fairy Tail Acres, the Rescue. 

Each of the presenters will introduce Webinar participants to their animal presenters.


 

You are invited to a Zoom webinar.
When: Jul 22, 2020 01:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
Topic: The Joy of Animals!

Register in advance for this webinar:
https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_F0210kG-SoeU5f0SfJppjw

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

“‘More Than Physical Health’: Gym Helps 91-Year-Old Battle Isolation” – Kaiser Health News

beat social isolation“Art Ballard loads a 25-pound plate onto the leg press. ‘At my age, the best thing you can do is find a routine.'” (Heidi de Marco/KHN)

by Heidi De Marco

“MONROVIA, Calif. — Most mornings, like clockwork, you could find Art Ballard pumping iron.

“At least five days a week, he drove to Foothill Gym, where he beat on the punching bag, rode a stationary bike and worked his abs. After he joined the gym five years ago, he dropped 20 pounds, improved his balance and made friends.

“At 91, he’s still spry and doesn’t take any medication other than an occasional Tylenol for aches and pains.

“’Doctors love me,’ he said.

“But when California enacted a statewide stay-at-home order in mid-March, his near-daily physical exercise and social interactions abruptly ended.”

Keep reading this inspiring article, click here.

“And now, hospice!” – Time Goes By

time goes by

This site has been recommending this Website for a number of years.  The creator of the site has been contributing witty, brilliant, funny and candid writings about the subtitle: “What it’s really like to get old.”

What better to write about any topic hat to have experienced it.

For those of you who may have been following Ronnie Bennett’s journey, she was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer three years ago. Today’s column is entitled, And Now, Hospice.”

Ronnie, we admire your strength, courage, foresight and candor. Thank for taking us along on your journey.

“Alone and booming” – Boston Globe OPINION

“I had forgotten to get married, forgotten to have children, forgotten to make money. After caretaking two older parents, I am now alone in our house, which I own.”

alone boomerSHUTTERSTOCK/LIGHTSPRING

by Mary Ann D’Urso

A stone’s throw away from 40, my New York sublet ending, and with not much more than my demure velvet sofa, a suitcase of regrets, and the manuscript I had bled over in my thirties, I headed back to the suburbs and my childhood home.

“I had forgotten to get married, forgotten to have children, forgotten to make money. In our culture, no one views an adult’s move back home as a boon. I was the Hester Prynne of Forest Drive, my Scarlet ‘L’ for Loser strapped to my chest for all the neighbors to see.

“After caretaking two older and full-blooded Sicilian parents, I am now alone in our house, which I own.”

Click here to continue reading this piece at The Boston Globe.

Serving Diverse Elders: Strategies for Meaningful Inclusion in Service Planning and Delivery

serving diverse elders

Download the file, click on the graphic.

This guide provides tools, resources, and best practices that the Aging Network can use as a reference to plan services and programs that are more inclusive to these diverse elders. The guide outlines background information on diverse elders; discusses how to asses the needs of this population and include them in the planning process; and highlights inclusive goals, objectives, and measures of success.

The National Consortium on Aging Resources for Seniors’ Equity has produced a guide to providing services for diverse populations of older adults. The group is funded by the Administration for Community Living (ACL) and includes the National Caucus & Center on Black Aging, Inc., National Indian Council on Aging, National Asian Pacific Center on Aging,  Asociación Nacional Pro Personas Mayores and National Resource Center on LGBT Aging.

 

“Coronavirus shows how ageism is harmful to health of older adults” – The Conversation

older persons and coronavirus“In Ventura, California, a woman who is social isolating greets a little boy who has come to visit. – Getty Images / Brent Stirton”

by Paul Nash and Philip W. Schnarrs

“People over 65 years old account for about 80% of the deaths related to COVID-19 in the U.S. But we have to consider comorbidity, not just the number of years lived. Older people more likely live with underlying health conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, lung conditions, diabetes and cancer. It is these complications, not just age, that dictate the mortality of COVID-19.

“Yet the misperception persists that older adults are frail and weak. As educators in the field of health and gerontology, we can tell you research shows that ageist attitudes harm the health of older adults. Indeed, the World Health Organization acknowledges ageism as the last socially accepted form of prejudice. And this impacts the kind of care they receive and the health care outcomes they experience.

“In the U.S., these perceptions are reinforced in medical training; geriatric care doesn’t even appear on the list of required training for doctors. This approach may have contributed to the U.S.‘s arguably poor response to COVID-19.”

Click here to continue reading this article at The Conversation.

 

PA Dept. of Aging State Plan on Aging 2020-2024 Community & Stakeholder Survey | Take the survey today.

state aging plan 1

We Want to Hear from You!Pennsylvania Seeks Community & Stakeholder Input for State Plan on Aging 2020 –2024

The Pennsylvania Department of Aging requests the assistance of community members and stakeholders who are passionate about the needs of older adults in helping to shape the priorities for our State Plan on Aging. Adults of all ages are invited to take part in a 5-10 minute online survey. Adults over 60 years old are especially encouraged to participate. The survey is open until June 21st and is available in English and Spanish at the link below.  Your input will help us build an innovative and responsive plan for the next four years. To complete the survey, follow the link below. To participate by phone, call the Department of Aging at: (717) 783-1550

Take Survey Now

“lonlieness and the absence of touch” | COVID-19 yields

covid senior despair(Hannah Norman / KHN Illustration)

by Judith Graham

“As states relax coronavirus restrictions, older adults are advised, in most cases, to keep sheltering in place. But for some, the burden of isolation and uncertainty is becoming hard to bear.

“This ‘stay at home awhile longer’ advice recognizes that older adults are more likely to become critically ill and die if infected with the virus. At highest risk are seniors with underlying medical conditions such as heart, lung or autoimmune diseases.

“Yet after two months at home, many want to go out into the world again. It is discouraging for them to see people of other ages resume activities. They feel excluded. Still, they want to be safe.”

Click here to read this Kaiser Health Network article in its entirety.


“Losing Touch: Another Drawback of the COVID-19 Pandemic” – The Scientist

“Affectionate touches tap into the nervous system’s rest and digest mode, reducing the release of stress hormones, bolstering the immune system, and stimulating brainwaves linked with relaxation.”

by Ashley Yeager | in The Scientist

“It had been seven weeks since I’d touched another human being. Arms outstretched, I walked quickly toward my dad, craving his embrace. In the instant before we touched, we paused, our minds probably running quick, last-minute calculations on the risk of physical contact. But, after turning our faces away from each other and awkwardly shuffling closer, we finally connected. Wrapped in my dad’s bear hug, I momentarily forgot we were in the midst of the worst global crisis I have ever experienced.

“’Touch is the most powerful safety signal of togetherness,’ says Steve Cole, a psychiatrist and biobehavioral scientist at the University of California, Los Angeles.”

To continue reading this article at The Scientist, click here.