Category Archives: Alzheimer’s Disease and related disorders

“‘You keep loving each other’: A window into dementia at the end of a lifelong partnership” – STATNews

you keep loving

“For Poul Mathiassen, Parkinson’s disease came as a cascade of losses. First, he could no longer control his toothbrush. Then he couldn’t remember his friends’ names. During the four years his granddaughter, photographer Sofie Mathiassen, spent chronicling his experience of dementia, she captured images of his increasing frailty but also of the 57-year relationship he’d built with his wife, Else. These moments are at once difficult and tender, a testament to the tiny, everyday actions that constitute care. Else shaves Poul, keeping him steady with a thumb and finger on the back of his neck. She helps him take a few halting steps, holding his hands as if in a careful dance. You can see more of Mathiassen’s powerful photo essay here.”

 

“New Therapies Help Patients With Dementia Cope With Depression” – The New York Times

“Many patients with cognitive impairment have anxiety or depression, but standard treatments are difficult for people with memory issues.”

dementia mental healthAnne Firmender received treatment for depression through a program called Problem Adaptation Therapy, which is specially suited to people with memory issues.” Credit … Geraldine Hope Ghelli for The New York Times

by Andrea Petersen

“Anne Firmender, 74, was working with her psychologist to come up with a list of her positive attributes.

“’I cook for others,’ said Ms. Firmender.

“’It’s giving,’ encouraged the psychologist, Dimitris Kiosses.

“”Good kids,’ continued Ms. Firmender, who has four grown children and four grandchildren.

“’And great mother,’ added Dr. Kiosses. Ms. Firmender smiled.

Dr. Kiosses typed up the list and handed a printout to Ms. Firmender to take home. ‘When you’re feeling down and hard on yourself, you can remind yourself of your strengths,’ he told her.”

Continue reading this article at The New York Times.

“For millennial caregivers, becoming the ‘parent for a parent’ with Alzheimer’s comes with agonizing challenges” – STAT news

The daily stresses, challenges and situations a caregiver attending to her mother with early onset Alzheimers faces are shown in this video.

alz caregivers

by Megan Thielking

WEYMOUTH, Mass. — Kamaria Moore-Hollis hadn’t even turned 30 when her mother, Mary, was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. She hadn’t yet started her job in social services for the state, or gotten married, or bought her house — all milestones she would mark after she became a caregiver.

“‘I grieved her loss probably five years ago,’” Moore-Hollis, now 34, said. ‘I don’t have an adult relationship with my mother. I can’t talk about frustrations at work or marriage or you know, just things that happen when you grow up.’”

Click here to read this article and to watch the nearly five minute video.

“Services Address Wandering in Those with Memory Impairment” – 50plus LIFE

wandering

by Megan Joyce 

“For caregivers of people with memory issues, keeping their loved one in a safe space — whether it’s their home or a care facility — is vital to the person’s well-being. But the reality is that 6 in 10 people with dementia will wander away from that safe space at least once.

“Someone with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia may wander as a result of agitation, confusion, anxiety, overstimulation, or the belief that they are searching for something. They may become disoriented and attempt to relive the past or revive past habits, such as going to work or returning to a familiar neighborhood.

“While wandering, the person might not recall their name or address, making it difficult for those who encounter the person to assess their needs and return them to safety.

“Clay Jacobs, vice president of programs and services for the Alzheimer’s Association Greater Pennsylvania Chapter, said anyone who has memory problems and is able to walk is at risk for wandering, even in the early stages of dementia. There are certain behaviors, however, that are red flags indicating wandering is more likely to occur.”

Continue reading this article at 50 plus LIFE in its entirety.


The publisher of 50plus LIFE, On-Line Publishers, Inc. is a Link to Aging and Disability Resource as are these entities mentioned in the article.

  • Alzheimer’s association® – Greater Pennsylvania Chapter – 706 Rothsville Road, Lititz PA 17543.  24/7 Helpline # – 1.800.272.3900 – “Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health.”  Call our Helpline for resources in your area.
  • On-Line Publishers, Inc. – On-Line Publishers, Inc. has more than 15 years’ experience in serving boomers, seniors, disabled, caregivers, and their families by providing relevant information utilizing a variety of platforms. Talk to us about our print and digital editions of 50plus Senior News50plus Senior Living, and the Resource Directory for Caregivers, Aging, and Disabled, and Caregiver Solutions. Or learn more about our annual 50plus EXPOs. For more click: www.onlinepub.com.
  • The Pilot Club of Lancaster, Inc. / Project Lifesaver® – This service club works closely with the local police departments to provide Project Lifesaver; an emergency response program for individual who may wander.

50plus LIFE is an award-winning publication published monthly, providing individuals 50 and over in the Susquehanna and Delaware valleys with timely and relevant information pertinent to their needs and interests. Editions in Chester, Cumberland, Dauphin, Lancaster, Lebanon, and York counties.


 

 

“Steps to Prevent Dementia May Mean Taking Actual Steps” – The New York Times

walking

“Brain-training apps can’t match the several ways that exercise benefits the mind, research shows.”

by Austin Frakt

“To ward off age-related cognitive decline, you may be tempted to turn to brain training apps. Last year, consumers spent nearly $2 billion on them, some of which claim to improve cognitive skills.

“Evidence suggests you’d be better off spending more time exercising and less time staring at your phone.

“This year the World Health Organization released evidence-based guidelines on reducing risks of cognitive decline and dementia. Although it pointed to some systematic reviews that reported positive cognitive effects of brain training, the W.H.O. judged the studies to be of low quality. Among the studies’ limitations is that they measure only short-term effects and in areas targeted by the training.”

Continue reading this article at The New York Times, click here.

“‘Please know you’re not alone’: For dementia caregivers, a place to share with strangers — and be honest” – STAT

dementiaHyacinth Empinado/STAT

“Barbara Metcalf and Mary Smallwood live 826 miles apart. They’ve never met in person. If not for a chance interaction on Facebook, they would have stayed strangers. But for months, the two women talked nearly every day, swapping stories and venting about their husbands, who both have dementia.

“Their husbands’ symptoms have manifested in particularly difficult, deeply isolating ways. They blamed their wives for their conditions. They blamed their wives for losing their jobs. They blamed their wives because they couldn’t drive anymore. They accused them of having affairs with the mailman or stealing their money. They urinated all over their houses, leaving the women cleaning for hours.

“’It was a constant battle of trying to keep him clean, keep him from having a UTI, keep his dignity, explain to him why it was all happening so he could understand it,’ Metcalf said.”

You can read this article in its entirety, click here.

A link? “Gum infection linked to Alzheimer’s disease, new study suggests” – USA Today

linkedCould Alzheimer’s disease be caused by a gum infection?

by Ashley May

“Alzheimer’s disease could be caused by a gum infection, according to a new study.

“The study, published this week in the peer-reviewed journal Science Advances, suggests the bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis that destroys gum tissue in the mouth is linked to dementia and Alzheimer’s.

“Researchers observed the bacteria in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease. They also conducted tests on mice that showed the gum infection led to an increased production of amyloid beta, a part of the amyloid plaques associated with Alzheimer’s disease.” Click here to continue reading this article at USA Today.


Another article from 2018, “How Gum Disease Could Lead to the Development of Alzheimer’s,” suggests the same conclusion.

TEDxTAlk | “Dementia is preventable through lifestyle. Start now.”

NOTE FROM TED: Please do not look to this talk for medical advice. We’ve flagged this talk for falling outside TEDx’s curatorial guidelines. This talk represents the speaker’s personal views and experiences with nutrition, mental health, and human biology. TEDx events are independently organized by volunteers. The guidelines we give TEDx organizers are described in more detail here: http://storage.ted.com/tedx/manuals/t…

“Health and science journalist Max Lugavere has always been close with his mom. When she began to show signs of dementia in her early fifties, it shook him to his core. Wasn’t dementia an old person’s disease? And with drug trials having a near 100% failure rate, what was there to do? In 2017, a leading Alzheimer’s organization recognized for the first time that one third of dementia cases may be preventable. And so Max decided to devote himself to figuring out how he and his peers could best avoid the disease.

In this illuminating talk, Max discusses the fascinating diet and lifestyle changes associated with significant risk reduction for Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, and what that means. For more, pick up his New York Times bestselling book, GENIUS FOODS. Max Lugavere is a filmmaker, author, and TV personality. He is the director of the upcoming film BREAD HEAD, the first-ever documentary about dementia prevention through diet and lifestyle, and is publishing his first book in early 2018 documenting his findings on how to optimize focus, productivity, mood, and long-term brain health with food.

Lugavere is a regularly-appearing “core expert” on The Dr. Oz Show, has been featured on NBC Nightly News, in the Wall Street Journal, and has contributed as a health journalist to Medscape, Vice/Munchies, the Daily Beast, and others. He is a highly sought-after speaker and has been invited to keynote events such as the Biohacker Summit in Stockholm Sweden, and esteemed academic institutions like the New York Academy of Sciences. His newest book, GENIUS FOODS, is a New York Times best seller.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community.

“Study finds test of protein levels in the eye a potential predictor of (future) Alzheimer’s disease” – Science Daily

“Low levels of amyloid-beta and tau proteins, biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease, in eye fluid were significantly associated with low cognitive scores, according to a new study. These findings indicate that proteins in the eye may be a potential source for an accessible, cost-effective test to predict future Alzheimer’s disease.”

alzheimers - eye fluidsAlzheimer’s definition (stock image). – Credit: © Feng Yu / Fotolia

“Low levels of amyloid-β and tau proteins, biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), in eye fluid were significantly associated with low cognitive scores, according to a new study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. Led by researchers at Boston Medical Center, the study is the first to connect these known AD protein biomarkers in the eye to mental status. These findings indicate that proteins in the eye may be a potential source for an accessible, cost-effective test to predict future Alzheimer’s disease.

“Diagnosing and starting treatment for AD before symptoms begin is key to managing the disease, because by the time symptoms appear it is often too late for current treatments to have any meaningful effect. Abnormal amounts of amyloid-β and tau proteins are biomarkers of AD, and deposits of amyloid proteins in the brain begin many years prior to symptoms of the disease. Previous research has shown an association between low levels of amyloid-β and tau proteins found in the cerebrospinal fluid obtained by lumbar puncture tests and preclinical AD, when pathological changes of AD present in the brain, but before the onset of clinical symptoms. However, lumbar puncture tests are expensive and inconvenient for many patients to undergo.”

Read this article in full at Science Daily, click here.

 

June 10 – Full-Day Dementia Conference | Save the date

6-10 dementia conference