Category Archives: Alzheimer’s Disease and related disorders

TEDxTAlk | “Dementia is preventable through lifestyle. Start now.”

NOTE FROM TED: Please do not look to this talk for medical advice. We’ve flagged this talk for falling outside TEDx’s curatorial guidelines. This talk represents the speaker’s personal views and experiences with nutrition, mental health, and human biology. TEDx events are independently organized by volunteers. The guidelines we give TEDx organizers are described in more detail here: http://storage.ted.com/tedx/manuals/t…

“Health and science journalist Max Lugavere has always been close with his mom. When she began to show signs of dementia in her early fifties, it shook him to his core. Wasn’t dementia an old person’s disease? And with drug trials having a near 100% failure rate, what was there to do? In 2017, a leading Alzheimer’s organization recognized for the first time that one third of dementia cases may be preventable. And so Max decided to devote himself to figuring out how he and his peers could best avoid the disease.

In this illuminating talk, Max discusses the fascinating diet and lifestyle changes associated with significant risk reduction for Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, and what that means. For more, pick up his New York Times bestselling book, GENIUS FOODS. Max Lugavere is a filmmaker, author, and TV personality. He is the director of the upcoming film BREAD HEAD, the first-ever documentary about dementia prevention through diet and lifestyle, and is publishing his first book in early 2018 documenting his findings on how to optimize focus, productivity, mood, and long-term brain health with food.

Lugavere is a regularly-appearing “core expert” on The Dr. Oz Show, has been featured on NBC Nightly News, in the Wall Street Journal, and has contributed as a health journalist to Medscape, Vice/Munchies, the Daily Beast, and others. He is a highly sought-after speaker and has been invited to keynote events such as the Biohacker Summit in Stockholm Sweden, and esteemed academic institutions like the New York Academy of Sciences. His newest book, GENIUS FOODS, is a New York Times best seller.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community.

“Study finds test of protein levels in the eye a potential predictor of (future) Alzheimer’s disease” – Science Daily

“Low levels of amyloid-beta and tau proteins, biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease, in eye fluid were significantly associated with low cognitive scores, according to a new study. These findings indicate that proteins in the eye may be a potential source for an accessible, cost-effective test to predict future Alzheimer’s disease.”

alzheimers - eye fluidsAlzheimer’s definition (stock image). – Credit: © Feng Yu / Fotolia

“Low levels of amyloid-β and tau proteins, biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), in eye fluid were significantly associated with low cognitive scores, according to a new study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. Led by researchers at Boston Medical Center, the study is the first to connect these known AD protein biomarkers in the eye to mental status. These findings indicate that proteins in the eye may be a potential source for an accessible, cost-effective test to predict future Alzheimer’s disease.

“Diagnosing and starting treatment for AD before symptoms begin is key to managing the disease, because by the time symptoms appear it is often too late for current treatments to have any meaningful effect. Abnormal amounts of amyloid-β and tau proteins are biomarkers of AD, and deposits of amyloid proteins in the brain begin many years prior to symptoms of the disease. Previous research has shown an association between low levels of amyloid-β and tau proteins found in the cerebrospinal fluid obtained by lumbar puncture tests and preclinical AD, when pathological changes of AD present in the brain, but before the onset of clinical symptoms. However, lumbar puncture tests are expensive and inconvenient for many patients to undergo.”

Read this article in full at Science Daily, click here.

 

June 10 – Full-Day Dementia Conference | Save the date

6-10 dementia conference

 

“Time for a Manhattan Project on Alzheimer’s” – The Conversation

by Marc Diamond

“Imagine if Alzheimer’s was treated like other common diseases. Instead of worrying about the prospect of slowly losing your memory, you might get a series of shots during middle age to prevent the onset of this neurological nightmare, just as we do to reduce the risk of flu. Or you could take a daily pill as many do to control their cholesterol or blood pressure.

alz reportIn Alzheimer’s, toxic clumps of protein kill brain cells which shrinks the size of the brain as the disease progresses. BlueRingMedia/Shutterstock.com

“That may sound improbable, given the long string of Alzheimer’s drugs that have failed to work in clinical trials, but I remain optimistic. As a physician-scientist leading research into the causes of neurodegenerative diseases, I believe that we are making significant progress on uncovering the roots of Alzheimer’s.

“Alzheimer’s is a neurodegenerative disease that has stymied researchers for years. The disease develops when two proteins – A-beta and tau – accumulate in the brain. A-beta builds up outside of nerve cells, and tau inside them. Decades of study suggests that A-beta somehow leads to the accumulation of tau, which is what causes nerve cells to die. This may explain why early treatments focusing exclusively on A-beta failed. These ideas have led to new diagnostic criteria that take into account these two proteins to make the definitive diagnosis.”

Continue reading this article, click here.

“Assisted Living’s Breakneck Growth Leaves Safety Of Dementia Patients Behind” – Kaiser Health News

alzheimers death“Stephanie Weaver holds a photo of her grandmother, Bonnie Walker. Weaver is suing Brookdale Charleston for emotional distress following Walker’s death in a pond behind the assisted living facility in 2016.” – (LEIGH WEBBER FOR KHN)

by Jordan Rau

“They found Bonnie Walker’s body floating in a pond behind her assisted living facility in South Carolina. There were puncture wounds on her ear, her temple, her jaw and her cheeks.

“Her right forearm and her pacemaker were inside one of the alligators that lived in the pond.

“Like 4 in 10 residents in assisted living facilities, Walker, 90, had dementia. Shortly after midnight one day in July 2016, she slipped out of her facility, Brookdale Charleston, as she had done a few days before. This time, no one noticed her missing for seven hours.

“‘No one should have to pass away that way.’”

Read this Kaiser Health News article in its entirety, click here.

Alzheimers’ Community Forum | November 29

alz community forum

Click here to register.

“I Would Have Driven Her Anywhere | Caring for a mother who suffers from dementia was really hard. I wish I could do it again.” – The New York Times

Modern LoveBrian Rea

by Melanie Bishop

“When my mother was booted from an assisted living facility in North Carolina for being ‘too high maintenance,’ my husband, Ted, and I agreed to have her live near us in Prescott, Ariz.

“She had spent seven years of dementia in assisted-living facilities, first near my brother in Austin, Tex., and then near my two sisters in Asheville, N.C. It was our turn. My mother never liked any of these facilities, but she disliked the one here most of all. Sometimes, she disliked me.

“One of the few things she did like about Prescott was being reunited with her old car, a 1992 Honda Accord she had sold to me years before, shortly after my father had died.”

“The Honda connected her to her life before dementia … “

Read this piece in its entirety at The New York Times.

“The Comforting Fictions of Dementia Care” – The New Yorker

“Many facilities are using nostalgic environments as a means of soothing the misery, panic, and rage their residents experience.”

fictions of dementia care“The memory-care unit in Ohio’s Chagrin Valley is designed to look like an American town from its residents’ childhoods.” – Photograph by Philip Montgomery for The New Yorker

by Larissa MacFarquhar

“The large central room of the memory-care unit was designed to look like an old-fashioned American town square. There was a small fountain, surrounded by plants and a low stone wall; there were a couple of lampposts, and benches, tables, and chairs set about. The carpet was mottled with darker and lighter shades of green, to resemble grass growing and bending in different directions. Along the walls were the façades of what looked like clapboard houses, with wooden shutters and shingled pitched roofs and porches that extended into the room. Two long hallways, which led off from opposite sides of the central room, looked like streets in the same town, with more clapboard façades and porches on either side. These façades were not altogether fake: each front door opened onto a suite of small rooms—living room, bedroom, bathroom—that was a resident’s home.

“Some of the porches had rocking chairs that you could sit in and watch people go by. Many of the residents were quite restless, and there was nowhere else to go, so people did walk by fairly often. Daylight came in through high windows just below the ceiling, and the ceiling itself consisted of bright light panels painted to look like a blue sky dotted with clouds. In the evening, as it began to grow dark outside, lights on the porches came on. Sometime later, the street lamps were lit; and finally, around eight o’clock, the ceiling sky was switched off, so that the unit came to look like a small-town street at night.

“The illusion was surprisingly effective.”

This is a long read; click here to continue reading this article at The New Yorker.

“Barcelona lab finds treatment that slows down Alzheimer’s” – WikiTribune

  • Findings open new avenues for the research of neurodegenerative disorders
  • 75-year-old company began its research on Alzheimer’s in 2004
  • Procedure is safe and feasible

brain

A renowned Spanish laboratory presented the results of clinical tests that show a dramatic reduction in the progression of moderate Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) patients, in a new step towards an innovative approach to fight this neurodegenerative disease.

“At the Clinical Trials on Alzheimer’s Disease (CTAD) congress last 27 October in Barcelona, Laboratorios Grifols’ CEO Víctor Grifols said the results ‘open a new path in the treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease’ and remarked that his company ‘will continue to explore the potential of plasma proteins and plasma exchange in subsequent studies.’”

Read this article at WikiTribune in its entirety here.

 

“Blythe Danner and Hilary Swank Soar in Caregiving Movie ‘What They Had'” – AARP

Their new landmark Alzheimer’s film is heartbreaking, inspiring, funny and true

ATM_Cover_OctNov

At first, Blythe Danner and Hilary Swank seem utterly different as you watch them chatting together in a vast white room in Manhattan on a fine summer morning.

“Swank, 44, a buff former high school gymnastics champ who grew up in a trailer park in Washington state, is direct, peppy, coachlike. ‘Make a choice about the optimism you want to bring into your life!’ she exhorts us at one point.

“The imperially slim Danner, 75, a Philadelphia banker’s daughter, is reserved and self-deprecating, even after a half-century of acting triumphs. Though she introduced her daughter, Gwyneth Paltrow, to acting, she says Gwynnie is the genius in the family. ‘She has such self-esteem and self-awareness, all the things I never had,’ Danner notes.”

Continue reading this article at AARP Magazine, click here.