Category Archives: Events & Actvities

“What Makes a Community Livable?” – AARP

English-In a Livable Community Poster

“The formula for what makes a community livable isn’t particularly complex. For the most part, the features and needs are fairly simple.

“But living in a place that, say, requires having a car for every errand or outing can be a difficult place to live if you don’t have a car or can’t drive.

“Living in a place without access to outdoor spaces, good schools and healthy food isn’t very livable, especially for young families.

“Living in a community that isn’t safe, or offers few activities, can be isolating for people regardless of age.

“On the other hand, a community that includes all of the features pictured in our “In a Livable Community” handout can be great — for people of all ages!”

AND people with a disability!

Millersville University offers two presentations that veterans can appreciate.

MU programs for veteransfor free tickets to these productions.

The Interpreters – On Screen/In Person | September 26, 2019 @ 7:00 PM

Happy Labor Day!

we can do it.jpg

This famous poster shows the indomitable spirit of the American Worker. Used by the War Production Co-Ordinating Committee during World War II, the determination and grit seems an apt way to recognize Labor Day in 2019. Here’s the background information on the poster.

“The first Labor Day was held in 1882. Its origins stem from the desire of the Central Labor Union to create a holiday for workers. It became a federal holiday in 1894. It was originally intended that the day would be filled with a street parade to allow the public to appreciate the work of the trade and labor organizations. After the parade, a festival was to be held to amuse local workers and their families. In later years, prominent men and women held speeches. This is less common now, but is sometimes seen in election years. One of the reasons for choosing to celebrate this on the first Monday in September, and not on May 1, which is common in the rest of the world, was to add a holiday in the long gap between Independence Day and Thanksgiving.” – Timeanddate.com

“Opioid / scam awareness” FREE Link training affords exceptional opportunity for everyone

Berks Lancaster lebanon

“The face of the nation’s opioid epidemic increasingly is gray and wrinkled. But that face often is overlooked in a crisis that frequently focuses on the young.”

And this is the singular reason the Pennsylvania Link to Aging and Disability Resources | Berks-Lancaster-Lebanon Service Area asked Special Agent Alan McGill to come to our counties for the above presentations in each county.

McGill is a Special Agent with the Pennsylvania Attorney General’s office and those who attended the presentations in Lebanon and Lancaster all agreed: THIS WAS AN EXCEPTIONALLY WELL DONE SESSION THAT IS SO IMPORTANT. (The Berks County presentation is today at the McGlinn Conference Center in Reading.)

Following the “Opioids & Dangerous Drugs” presentation, Jerry Mitchell, Pennsylvania Attorney General’s office education & outreach | scam awareness subject matter expert facilitated a dynamic brief mini-presentation about scams and fraud.

“The heroin and opioid epidemic is the number one public health and public safety challenge facing Pennsylvania.  In 2016, 4,642 Pennsylvanians died from overdoses – a 37 percent increase from the year before. An average of 14 Pennsylvanians die every day from overdose, and based on available data from 2017 the death toll will only continue to rise.

“Opioids come in many different forms with many different names, including OxyContin, Percocet, Vicodin, Codeine, Hydrocodone, Morphine and Heroin

“Health effects of prolonged opioid use:

  • Depression
  • Liver disease
  • Heart disease
  • Hepatitis C (through shared needles)
  • HIV/AIDS (through shared needles)
  • Brain damage
  • Death (by overdose)

“Opioids are often stolen from someone with a legitimate prescription. Seventy percent of people that illegally use prescription drugs admit getting them from family and friends. The number one source of drugs for teenagers is home medicine cabinets.

“Opioids can also be obtained when a person is legally prescribed a drug and then abuses it, prescriptions are forged and altered, or the medications are purchased from a dealer illegally selling prescription drugs.” – SOURCE: Office of the Attorney General Website

There is so much evidence that opioid and other substances are being sought and used by older persons. “Older adults are among the groups affected by this problem because Continue reading →

Increasingly popular | “Deathwives, Death Cafes And Death Doulas. Learning To Live By Talking About Death. – Forbes Magazine

“Whatever the reason, a reluctance to face or even talk about dying is largely an American phenomenon.”

eat cake and talk about death

by Robin Seaton Jefferson

“‘To die will be an awfully big adventure.’ Even Peter Pan, the mischievous little boy who refuses to grow up but rather spends his never-ending childhood adventuring on the island of Neverland, attempted to see death in a positive light.

“But things were different in 1902 when Peter Pan first appeared in the book ‘The Little White Bird.’ We saw death differently then and treated it more as a part of life. Is it because we believe we’re more likely to avoid it for longer in the 21st century that we seem to shy away from talking about it? Or is it because we have removed ourselves so far from the reality of physically dealing with the dead.

“Whatever the reason, a reluctance to face or even talk about dying is largely an American phenomenon. And though there are many and varied ways for families and friends to honor their dead, we don’t seem to want to talk about it until it’s too late. And then we pay others to handle most of it.”

Continue reading this article at Forbes.com.


THREE DEATH CAFES ARE SCHEDULED FOR Lancaster County in the next few weeks. RSVP for one that fits your schedule; find out why Death Cafes have become so popular. All Death Cafes are FREE to attend, but you must RSVP.

COLUMBIA, Monday, August 26 – 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm

Nissley Vineyards, Sunday, September 15 – 1:00 to 3:00 pm 

Lancaster County’s first Latino Death Cafe, (conversations in English and Spanish), Thursday, September 19 – 5:30 to 7:00 pm 

“Changes to PA General Assistance”

pa dhs logo

“As required by Act 12 of 2019, which amended 62 P.S. § 403.2(a), the General Assistance program will end on August 1, 2019. No General Assistance cash assistance will be dispersed after July 31, 2019. Current General Assistance recipients were notified of this change via mail, but we recognize that there will likely be questions.

If people you work with currently receive or think they qualify for General Assistance, they may qualify for other benefits. Individuals can work with a COMPASS Community Partner or contact their local County Assistance Office or apply online via COMPASS at www.compass.state.pa.us. If you are not a COMPASS Community Partner, more information on registering is available here.

If they are currently receiving other benefits like Medical Assistance or Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), those benefits will continue. The Department of Human Services (DHS) will notify clients again before making changes to other benefits for any reason.

People seeking more information can contact the DHS Helpline at 1-800-692-7462. TDD Services are available at 1-800-451-5886.

This change will likely result in an additional need for resources from charitable and social service organizations around the commonwealth. DHS is working closely with our partners to identify potential resources for people affected by this change. As we become aware of additional resources, we will share the information on DHS’ social media pages and through this newsletter.

Thank you for all that you do to help Pennsylvanians in need,

secretary signature

Secretary Miller

 

“The History of the Fourth of July” – Military.com

july 4

Today, Americans celebrate Independence Day! 

“On July 4, 1776, the 13 colonies claimed their independence from England, an event which eventually led to the formation of the United States. Each year on the fourth of July, also known as Independence Day, Americans celebrate this historic event.

“Conflict between the colonies and England was already a year old when the colonies convened a Continental Congress in Philadelphia in the summer of 1776. In a June 7 session in the Pennsylvania State House (later Independence Hall), Richard Henry Lee of Virginia presented a resolution with the famous words: ‘Resolved: That these United Colonies are, and of right ought to be, free and independent States, that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain is, and ought to be, totally dissolved.’”

Read more here.


“The Story of the Fourth of July” –  ConstitutionFacts.com

 

SAVE THE DATE(S) – “Racial disparity, implicit bias and white privilege” trainings

diversity

Register to attend the 17th Annual “Celebrating Cultural Diversity” event at Lebanon Valley College

cultural diversity

The Community Health Council of Lebanon County 
Presents

17th Annual Cultural Diversity Conference

sponsored in part by WellSpan Philhaven and Lebanon Valley College
August 7, 2019

Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2019-cultural-diversity-conference-registration-59066556661

The objective of this conference is to develop cultural awareness in the community by providing practical ideas and information for working with different cultures and abilities, and to initiate development of a local resource network.

“The Quest for the Multigenerational City | The lives of the young and the old rarely cross in many American cities.” – CityLab

multigenerational city

by Megan Kimble

“Faye is stressed out about the craft room in her condominium. ‘I get very overwhelmed when I try to clean it,’ she tells me when I arrive on the doorstep of her condo one hot Tuesday evening in June.

“She’d submitted a request for volunteer help through Capital City Village, a nonprofit in Austin, Texas, that helps older people age in their homes and communities, and I, a volunteer, had responded.

“’That’s OK, I love to organize,’ I say.

“’Well, I hope so,’ she says, already worrying as she invites me in and sits me down on the couch. She asks me to tell her about myself. She is skeptical: Why am I spending my Tuesday evening helping a retiree I’d never met clean her apartment?”

Click here to continue reading this CityLab article in its entirety.


age friendly world

Lancaster is an “age-friendly” place.