Category Archives: Housing

What to do if you’re renting a home during the COVID-19 Pandemic

covid-19 renters guide

SAVE THE DATE(s)! | THE 2020 PA Community Alliance Summit

PADDC community alliance summit

Poverty issues: evictions and what it costs to achieve self sufficiency

FROM AN E-mail from Pennsylvania Post:

“What’s it like to be on the verge of poverty, without a home but still trying to take part in politics. Studies show that those who live in unstable financial and housing conditions vote less often. And in Reading, where the eviction rate is highest among the state’s top five cities, that could mean low turnout in a city that has recently experienced an uptick in eligible Latino voters.”

eviction ratesSOURCE: Evictionlab.org


“The high cost of living in Pa: If you and your partner live in city suburbs with two children, you have to make $88,000 a year if you want to live without government assistance, according to a Self-Sufficiency Standard compiled for 41 states by the University of Washington. That’s a shocking number for most Pennsylvanians, where the median income for the state is about $28,000 lowerThe Inquirer broke down the standard of living calculations for the county suburbs surrounding Philly.

“Lax Regulations And Vulnerable Residents ‘A Recipe For Problems’ In Eldercare Homes” – NPR

pc placesJune (left) and Mary Kelly with a photo of their mother, Marilyn Kelly. Marilyn was living at Our House Too, in Rutland, Vt., before she died.”James Buck/VPR/Seven Days

by Emily Corwin, Derick Brouwer, Andrea Suosso

“Some states call them assisted living facilities; others, residential or personal care homes. These state-licensed facilities promise peace of mind for families whose elders require long-term care. In Vermont and elsewhere, investigations into these homes have revealed lax oversight, injuries and deaths.

“Few understand the risks like June Kelly. Her mother, Marilyn Kelly, was energetic and loved to go fishing when she moved into Our House Too, a 13-bed facility that advertised its memory-care expertise. Over the next eight months, almost everything went wrong that could.

“Often, her daughters arrived to find their 78-year-old mom in a stupor. June arrived one day to discover Marilyn trying to feed herself but unable to find her mouth with her fork.

“‘She was in her pajamas, and there was excrement down her arm,’ she recalled.”

 

“‘Trailer is akin to a slur’: Mobile home industry tries to remove stigma amid Lehigh Valley housing crunch” – The Morning Call

mobile home“Luis and Tammy Figueroa outside their home in the Whispering Hollow neighborhood in Allen Township, where they live with their three small children, on Thursday Feb, 6, 2020. This was their first home they bought together, in December 2018.” (JANE THERESE / Special to The Morning Call)

by Kayla Dwyer

It only took four months for Tammy Figueroa to realize renting was not for her, or her husband and three little children.

“She was scrolling on Facebook when she came across a listing for what would become their first home together: a tiny three-bedroom, two-bathroom cottage in Allen Township. She thought it was cute; her husband said, ‘No way.’

The 924-square-foot home was only $14,000.

“Then she noticed in the listing that it was a manufactured home — a mobile home, or the ‘T-word,’ trailer — but it didn’t end up mattering.”

Read this Morning Call article in its entirety, click here.

“Unlikely housemates: How a St. Louis startup matches empty nesters, millennials” – St. Louis Post Dispatch

odd couple housing“Amisha Wankede laughs with Sally Lorino as she prepares lunch for Lorino on Saturday, Jam. 4, 2020. Wankhede and Lorino Live together as a part of the Odd Couples Housing, a startup that matches seniors who have rooms to spare with younger adults, often students, looking for inexpensive housing. Photo by Troy Stolt.”

by Troy Stolt

“WENTZVILLE — When her husband died in a car accident, Karen Krienke, 65, found herself unexpectedly alone. Her home in Wentzville — once crowded with children — felt big and empty. Moreover, a bad back was slowing her down.

“Her daughter worried. “She’s so social,” said Jane Krienke, who lives in Washington, D.C. “I didn’t want her to be by herself.”

“Then, this summer, she found a St. Louis startup that matches older adults who have room to spare with millennials — often graduate students — who need a reasonably priced place to live.

odd couple housing 2

“Odd Couples Housing, which made its first match in late 2018, taps into a market driven by unprecedented growth in the over-65 population, baby boomers who want to remain in their homes but may be cash-strapped or could use help with household chores. So far, the company has made about 20 matches; it hopes to increase that tenfold by the end of this year.”

Continue reading this article at The St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

January 16 – FREE WEBINAR | Housing 101: addressing a housing crisis

housing 101

To register, click on the above graphic.

“One man turned nursing home design on its head when he created this stunning facility.” – upworthy.com

This is a 2016 article posted here because it makes sense and is often being used.

old idea

by Brian Porter

“92-year-old Norma had a strange and heartbreaking routine.

“Every night around 5:30 p.m., she stood up and told the staff at her Ohio nursing home that she needed to leave. When they asked why, she said she needed to go home to take care of her mother. Her mom, of course, had long since passed away.

“Behavior like Norma’s is quite common for older folks suffering from Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia. Walter, another man in the same assisted living facility, demanded breakfast from the staff every night around 7:30.

“Jean Makesh, CEO of Lantern assisted living facilities, says he meets folks with stories like these every day. It’s their stories that inspired him to make some changes at Lantern.

“‘I thought I knew a lot about elderly care. The more and more time I was spending with my clients, that’s when I realized, “Oh my god, I have no clue.”’

“Confusion is common in Alzheimer’s patients, but Makesh knew there had to be some way to minimize these conflicts.”

Continue reading this article, click here.


 

Housing costs ease for homeowners; not for renters

HOUSING

by Christopher Mazur

The housing cost burden has eased for U.S. homeowners but remained stagnant for renters since the peak of the recession in 2008.

“Recently released data from the American Community Survey (ACS) estimates the percentage of “burdened” households, or those that spend at least 35% of their monthly income on housing costs, and provides a 10-year look at the trends from 2008 to 2018.

“Burden Depends on Mortgage Status

“There were 77.7 million owner-occupied housing units in the United States in 2018. Approximately 62% of these homeowners had a mortgage, down 6.5 percentage points from 2008.

“the homeowner spends 35% or more of their monthly household income on mortgage payments, utility bills, real estate taxes, property insurance, and any required condominium or mobile home fees.”

Click here to read this article in its entirety at the US Census Bureau Website.

 

 

Self-Determination Housing Project Webinar Series: Assistance Animals Explained – October 17 at 2:30 PM

sdhp webinar

Do you have tenants, case workers, or other clientele that are requesting to have assistance animals in their unit?  Do you work with clients who are having to interact with hesitant landlords because they have a service animal?  If so, you might be wondering what rights tenants and landlords have when it comes to assistance animals.  Tune in to our webinar, Assistance Animals Explained, to find out:

  1. What SDHP does and how you can use our services
  2. What a reasonable accommodation is
  3. And rights both landlords and tenants have when it comes to assistance animals

Webinar scheduled for October 17, 2019 from 2:30 PM – 3:30 PM ET

This training is recommended for landlords and property managers, autism service coordinators, mental health caseworkers, ID housing caseworkers, hospital liaisons, and other providers serving individuals with disabilities.

Register for the webinar here, and feel free to share this information with colleagues and those in your network who are interested in this topic.

**If you have any questions about the training or need to request a disability related accommodation, please contact SDHP @ region1@sdhp.org.