Category Archives: Housing

Pennsylvanians Having Trouble Paying Rent – Apply for Assistance Today!

trouble paying rent

“Youth-Led Group Builds Tiny Home Village to Fight California’s Homelessness Crisis” – The Imprint

“The Oakland, California project will nearly double Alameda county’s capacity to serve homeless youth.”

tiny homes

by Sara Tiano

Ayear ago, the spot on Hegenberger Road in Oakland’s industrial district was but a barren parking lot. Today, it is an art-drenched neighborhood of ‘tiny homes’ created by a local nonprofit, the latest effort to address California’s youth homelessness crisis.

The 26 tiny homes, each measuring 8 feet by 10 feet, feature skylights, heated floors and custom Murphy beds that, when folded up, transform into a table.  Each miniature house designed for one is painted in an array of bright colors and adorned with two full-wall murals draping the exterior, depicting everything from a serene moonlit mermaid scene to a bustling cityscape dotted with protest signs — all painted by local youth artists.

There are shared bathrooms and two community yurts: one filled with couches and armchairs like the common room of a college dorm, and the other a kitchen and dining space. Lines of colorful planter boxes snaking across the lot bear flowers, vegetables and fruit trees.

‘This village is a metaphor for everyone realizing their vision for a cohesive, copacetic environment for people to grow,’ said 20-year-old Sean McCreary, who developed the tiny home village project along with his peers at the nonprofit Youth Spirit Artworks.”

Read this article in its entirety at The Imprint, click here.

“3D printing’s new challenge: Solving the US housing shortage” – Associated Press

3-d housing“This photo provided by ICON shows one of its 3D-printed homes in Austin, Texas. It’s part of a new generation of startups that wants to disrupt the way houses are built by automating production with industrial 3D printers. (Regan Morton Photography/Courtesy of ICON via AP)”

by Terence Chea

“A new generation of startups wants to disrupt the way houses are built by automating production with industrial 3D printers.

“3D printing, also known as additive manufacturing, uses machines to deposit thin layers of plastic, metal, concrete and other materials atop one another, eventually producing three-dimensional objects from the bottom up. In recent years, 3D printers have mostly been used to create small quantities of specialized items such as car parts or prosthetic limbs, allowing consumers or businesses to produce just what they need using the machines at home or work.

“Now a small number of startups around the world are applying 3D printing to home construction, arguing that it’s faster, cheaper and more sustainable than traditional construction. They say these technologies could help address severe housing shortages that have led to soaring home prices, overcrowding, evictions and homelessness across the U.S.

“But 3D home construction is still in the early stage of development. Most startups in this field are developing new technologies and not building homes yet. And two of the highest profile and best-financed companies – Mighty Buildings and ICON – have delivered fewer than 100 houses between them.

“To move beyond a niche market, construction firms will need to significantly ramp up production and persuade home buyers, developers and regulators that 3D printed houses are safe, durable and pleasing to the eye. They’ll also need to train workers to operate the machines and install the homes.”

Read this AP article in its entirety, click here.

 

“2 women are ‘boommates,’ educating others about sharing homes later in life” – Arizona Daily Star

boom mates“Deb Knox, left, shows Sharon Kha her choices as she prepares their lunch, April 6, 2021. The two came together four years ago when Kha needed help living in her home and Knox needed to get out of mortgage.” – Kelly Presnell / Arizona Daily Star

by Carmen Duarte

“Five years ago, Sharon Kha knew her living situation needed to change.

“She needed help because her Parkinson’s disease was advancing. She was diagnosed in 2003 with the brain disorder that leads to shaking, stiffness and difficulty with walking, balance and coordination.

“’I knew that I could no longer live alone, but I wasn’t ready to move into assisted living,’ recalled Kha, 77.

“’I needed someone to cook my evening meal and someone to live in my house who could respond if I fell,’ said the former broadcast journalist and retired associate vice president for University of Arizona Communications who also served as assistant to the UA president. She retired in 2005.

“A friend mentioned Deb Knox, 76, a self-employed businesswoman who is a writing coach for those interested in writing memoirs and autobiographies. Knox moved from New England to Tucson 20 years ago. She wanted to downsize and sell her midtown condo to get out from under a mortgage.

“Kha and Knox talked on the phone about five times, and their personalities clicked, said Kha.”

Read this article in its entirety at the Arizona Daily Star, click here.

For Lebanon Countians: Exciting news! Self-Determination Housing of Pennsylvania’s Home Modification Program is up and running again!

SDHP accessible program

We are reaching out to the community of Lebanon county to receive applicants for this program funded by DCED!  Multiple home modifications projects are currently underway across the state! Below is information about eligibility and how to get more information.  Please feel free to share with your Lebanon county community!

Eligibility criteria at-a-glance:

  • Income levels must not exceed 120% of area median income (all household income must be verified through proper documentation).
  • Priority given to individuals residing in counties not receiving financial assistance through other programs.
  • Homeowners need proof of homeowners’ insurance coverage.
  • Renters need a landlord letter of approval/permission for home modifications.
  • Applicant cannot be receiving other public funded assistance or waivers. (example: Community Health Choices (CHC) managed care organizations – MCOs)

Applications are now being accepted!

  • For more information and to receive an application, please call (610) 873-9595 or email Beth at beth.mckeown@inglis.org
  • See attached flyer for more information
  • Learn more about this program by clicking HERE

Exciting News for Berks County income eligible homeowners! Self-Determination Housing of Pennsylvania’s Home Modification Program is up and running again!

SDHP Home Mods Flyer

“Self-Determination Housing of Pennsylvania is reaching out to the community of  Berks County to receive applicants for this program funded by Pennsylvania’s Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED)!  Multiple home modifications projects are currently underway across the state! Below is information about eligibility and how to get more information.”

Eligibility criteria at-a-glance:

  • Income levels must not exceed 120% of area median income (all household income must be verified through proper documentation).
  • Priority given to individuals residing in counties not receiving financial assistance through other programs.
  • Homeowners need proof of homeowners’ insurance coverage.
  • Renters need a landlord letter of approval/permission for home modifications.
  • Applicant cannot be receiving other public funded assistance or waivers. (example: Community Health Choices (CHC) managed care organizations – MCOs)

Applications are now being accepted!

  • For more information and to receive an application, please call (610) 873-9595 or email Beth at beth.mckeown@inglis.org
  • See attached flyer for more information
  • Learn more about this program by clicking HERE

The ABCs of ADUs (Accessory Dwelling Units) | expanding housing options for persons who are aging and persons with a disability

adu

Nearly always mentioned in conversations about “seniors” and persons with a disability is “housing.” Housing and transportation insecurities. Add to that mix the word “affordable” and the conversations often come to abrupt halts.

One answer to the chronic affordable housing crunch in Service Area 13 counties, may be Accessory Dwelling Units — commonly known as backyard bungalows, garage apartments and so-called granny flats — which are small homes that exist on the same property lot as a single-family residence.

AARP has packaged a 20 page compendium on Accessory Dwelling Units (ADU’s) packed with great ideas. AARP writes, “Since ADUs can be created in many different shapes and styles, they’re able to fit discreetly into all sorts of communities, including suburban subdivisions, row-house streets (either with or without backalleys), walkable town or urban neighborhoods — and, of course, large lots and rural regions.”

Click on the graphic above or here to download the guide.  

A very modern look at “shared housing” – Register now for this FREE WEBINAR!

Webinar announcement SHARE housing

Register to attend this Webinar to find out more about this exiting program that’s providing some resolutions for the need for affordable housing; reducing social isolation; curbing loneliness with an updated look at some tested housing options. Click on the link or the above graphic to download a .pdf file with a clickable link.  

“New Housing Concepts Emerge For Adults With Developmental Disabilities” – disabilityscoop

dd housing“A rendering of a home in Crossbridge Point, a new community for adults with and without developmental disabilities that’s planned for Whitestown, Ind.” – (ILADD, Inc./Charles M. Brown Architect, Inc.)

by Michelle Diament

“Communities of varying shapes and styles are popping up across the country, all aiming to address the severe shortage of housing options for those with developmental disabilities.

Among the newest projects underway is a 15-acre community planned about 20 miles outside of Indianapolis that will offer homes for adults with and without developmental disabilities. The $12 million project that’s expected to open in 2023 will include various size homes as well as a community center and feature clubs and classes promoting independent living skills. Known as Crossbridge Point, the community being developed by the nonprofit ILADD, Inc. is among the first aimed at people with developmental disabilities that will allow families to purchase homes, though the plan also calls for rental units to be available.

“’Families increasingly are telling us they want the permanence and equity of home ownership,’ said Mark L. Olson, president and CEO of LTO Ventures, which serves as consultant and project manager for the development and others like it. ‘It provides certainty in that a landlord cannot sell a home out from under tenants who may be leasing. It gives the family more control over accommodations or modifications that may need to be made. It builds equity that the adult with IDD can tap into later in their life after the parents are gone. It protects against rent increases or landlord discrimination.’”

Continue reading this article at disabilityscoop.com.

“Dying on the streets: As the homeless age, a health care system leaves them behind” – STATNews

aging and homelessDwane Foreman, 68, rests in his car in East Oakland, Calif.”ALISSA AMBROSE/STAT

by Bob Tedeschi

OAKLAND, Calif. — The elderly man winced as two friends lifted him from his car, and he walked, as if on broken glass, along the curb of a dead end street in an East Oakland neighborhood. It took him several minutes to walk 15 yards, and when he sat again he needed still more time to regain his breath.

“His eyes were pressed shut, and as he waited for the pain and breathlessness to pass, his fingertips worked the skin of one knotted, ebony hand. Finally he lifted his head and, with the hint of a smile, said his name was Dwane Allen Foreman. ‘I’ve got a long story,’ he said.

“The short version is that Foreman is 68 and homeless, and has HIV, hepatitis C, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and, more recently, lung cancer, and he worries he will die on the street. If he does, he will be one of hundreds in the United States who do so every year, dying in the kind of squalor and emotional and physical suffering that is more commonly the hallmark of war zones and developing nations.

“Such cases are becoming more common, researchers said, as the homeless population ages. In the early 1990s, 11 percent of homeless adults were over 50. Now more than half are 50 or older.”

Keep reading this article at STATNews, click here.