Category Archives: Housing

“Tiny houses multiply amid big issues as communities tackle homelessness” – The Washington Post

“A project for former service members could become a model for other cities in the United States.”

tinyhouses“In a community of tiny houses in Kansas City, Mo., Air Force veteran Leo Morris now calls #3 his own. (Christopher Smith/For The Washington Post)”

 The 13 tiny houses sit in neat rows on the small plot of land in south Kansas City. There’s a comforting uniformity to the group, each structure a simple A-frame or slant roof, painted a rich hue: deep blue or dark maroon, slate gray or mustard yellow. An American flag flies outside most of the homes.

The lives inside also match. The men and women here have all served their country in uniform. And every one of them was homeless before arriving this year and being given their own address and key.

“’We build communities — communities that are the beginning of a journey for those who said yes to this country and need someone to say yes back to them,’ said Brandonn Mixon, an entrepreneur who helped to found the Veterans Community Project out of frustration with the usual efforts to get veterans off the streets.”

Continue reading this Washington Post article here.

 

“What is ‘quality’ in aged care? Here’s what studies (and our readers) say” – The Conversation

quality aging care

Though this article comes from the Australian version of The Conversation, “Everyone has their own idea of what quality of care and quality of life in residential aged care may look like. The Conversation asked readers how they would want a loved one to be cared for in a residential aged care facility. What they said was similar to what surveys around the world have consistently found.

Click here to read the article in its entirety.

 

“Could this curious roommate pairing be the solution to the housing crisis?” – The Boston Globe

Here’s an intriguing concept that can be one small solution to a housing crunch. Tight housing markets present real quandaries for many. Yet this “curious roommate pairing” — or shared housing concept — may be worth looking at … for lots of reasons.

shared housing“Dean Kaplan and Sarah Heintz chatted in the apartment they share in Cambridge.” – JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF

“After living with more than a dozen different roommates in his young life, most of them strangers, Dean Kaplan is well-versed in the particulars of those first meetings — the short introductions, the perfunctory pleasantries, and then the quick getting on with life.

“‘After you move enough times,’ said the 25-year-old Baltimore native, there is ‘definitely a high degree of nonchalance.’

“In late August, though, as he stood on the front porch of a sizable multistory house in Cambridge ready to meet his newest roommate, he found himself uncharacteristically nervous and eager to make a good first impression.”

“Of all the roommates he’d had in the previous few years, Sarah Heintz would be the first septuagenarian.”

Read this Boston Globe article in its entirety here.

complications

Can there be complications? Sure, but …

As the National Shared Housing Resource Center points out:

Home Sharing is a simple idea: a homeowner offers accommodation to a homesharer in exchange for an agreed level of support in the form of financial exchange, assistance with household tasks, or both.

“The community is also a beneficiary of Home Sharing. Shared living makes efficient use of existing housing stock, helps preserve the fabric of the neighborhood and, in certain cases, helps to lessen the need for costly chore/care services and long term institutional care.

“A home sharer might be a senior citizen, a person with disabilities, a working professional, someone at-risk of homelessness, a single parent, or simply a person wishing to share his or her life and home with others. For these people, shared housing offers companionship, affordable housing, security, mutual support and much more.

“Home Sharing programs can offer a more secure alternative to other roommate options. Many programs have staff who are trained to carefully screen each program applicant through interviewing, background checking, and personal references.”

Earlier this month a Pennsylvania Link to Aging and Disability Resources WEBINAR introduced a pilot program that’s operating in northeast Pennsylvania.

SHAREYou can see the slides from the PowerPoint about this program — in Pike, Wayne, and Monroe Counties — here.

 

“How Retirement Housing Will Change for the Better” – next avenue

“A senior housing expert looks into his crystal ball and sees challenges ahead”

Retirement-HousingPHOTO SOURCE: Merrill Gardens

by Chris Farrell

“For a glimpse into the future of retirement communities and — pardon the odious term — ‘senior housing,’ you couldn’t do much better than to ask Robert Kramer. He and several partners got together in 1991 to launch what has become the leading trade group for this industry, the National Investment Center for Seniors Housing and Care (NIC), based in Annapolis, Md. And he has been a revered authority on this subject ever since.

“Kramer, who first got involved in this field in the early 1980s, turned over the CEO post at NIC to a younger colleague last July. Now that he’s ‘unretired”’ and a NIC adviser, I spoke with Kramer about what he sees ahead for retirement housing and the challenges developers face to make their communities and facilities more inviting to older Americans.

Boomers Will Change Retirement Housing

“In short, Kramer believes boomers, some of whom are now in their early 70s, will transform the industry, which now includes more than 23,000 professionally-managed senior housing and nursing care communities.

“’We’re entering a time of disruptive innovation. The basic business model and system will be radically disrupted.’”

Click here to continue reading this article at next avenue.

 

“In the Nursing Home, Empty Beds and Quiet Halls” – The New York Times

“Fewer patients are winding up in nursing homes, and hundreds of the facilities are closing each year.” 

nursing home closePatrick Crump, chief executive of the nonprofit Morningside Ministries, at Chandler Estate, a nursing home in San Antonio. The facility closed this year.” – CreditIlana Panich-Linsman for The New York Times

by Paula Spahn

“For more than 40 years, Morningside Ministries operated a nursing home in San Antonio, caring for as many as 113 elderly residents. The facility, called Chandler Estate, added a small independent living building in the 1980s and an even smaller assisted living center in the 90s, all on the same four-acre campus.

“The whole complex stands empty now. Like many skilled nursing facilities in recent years, Chandler Estate had seen its occupancy rate drop.

“’Every year, it seemed a little worse,’ said Patrick Crump, chief executive of the nonprofit organization, supported by several Protestant groups. ‘We were running at about 80 percent.’”

Continue reading this article at The New York Times, click here.

Housing Quick Reference Guide

housing quick reference

Click here to see the complete Quick Reference Guide.

“Keeping the lights on: Find housing & utility benefits” – NCOA

“Most older adults want to remain living at home as long as they can, but what happens when the cost of maintaining that home becomes difficult? Fortunately for families struggling to make ends meet, there are several benefits programs that can help.

keeping lights on

Keep reading for information on the types of programs available, and where to get more information to find out if you’re eligible and where to apply.

“A New Smoking Ban in Public Housing Roils Some Residents” – StateLine

“Public housing tenants are more likely to smoke than people who don’t live in public housing.”

smoking“Larry Curry, left, and Delores Hall, right, light up outside the Barge Highrise senior housing complex in Atlanta, Georgia. A new nationwide ban on smoking in public housing has them hopping mad — and relegated to smoking at a nearby bus stop.” – The Pew Charitable Trusts

“ATLANTA — It’s August here, which means things are hot, verging on swampy. And it’s cigarette break time, which means the denizens of the Barge Road Highrise senior housing complex are both hot and cranky. Really cranky.

“The source of their ire: Thanks to a new nationwide ban on smoking in public housing, they can no longer light up in the air-conditioned privacy of their own homes. Instead, as Atlanta Housing Authority tenants, they’re now relegated to the steamy outskirts of the property — to be precise, the MARTA bus stop, where a cluster of them are now huddled.

“So yeah, they’re mad.”

Continue reading this article at StateLine, click here.

 

Lancaster Housing Opportunity Partnership [LHOP] releases updated “KNOW YOUR RIGHTS: Landlord & Tenant Guide

new landlord tenant guide

The Lancaster Housing Opportunity Partnership has just announced the brand new updated “Know Your Rights: Landlord & Tenant Guide.”

Click here to download a copy.

Confused about when to call 2-1-1 and 9-1-1?

Berks County Commissioner Kevin S. Barnhardt recently “unveiled a magnet that will be made available to county residents in an effort to make them aware of when it’s appropriate to call 911 and when they should dial 211.”

2-1-1Click on the graphic above to watch a five minute video that will explain what 2-1-1 is and how it differs from 9-1-1.

Read these articles, too, for more information.