Category Archives: Veterans

Medal of Honor Webinar Series brought to you by the Army Heritage Center Foundation

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Veterans’ Event Goes Virtual; Job Fair Now Extended to Non-Vets

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Veterans’ Expo & Job Fair events for Lebanon County, York County and the Capital Area have been combined and redesigned to serve the community virtually.

vet expo

Originally planned for separate central Pennsylvania locations this fall, the now-virtual Veterans’ Expo will be available online Sept. 15-30 at www.veteransexpo.com.

Presented by OLP Events, the Veterans’ Expo connects active and retired military members and their families with benefits and resources available to them through local community-service providers, healthcare professionals, VA benefits counselors, VFWs and American Legions.

Exhibitors also include continuing-education opportunities and a broad range of businesses, from home improvement, legal services and finance to retirement living and insurance.

Job Fair

The Job Fair has transitioned to virtual as well and has been widened in scope to include both veterans and the area’s civilian community.

Running concurrently with the Veterans’ Expo, the Jobs717 job fair will be open Sept. 15-30 and can be accessed at www.jobs717.com and is open to jobseekers and employers in or near the 717 area code.

During Jobs717, individuals seeking employment can browse through employer thumbnails and select the companies of their choice to learn more information.

Each employer’s custom page will include their company information, website link, job vacancies, social media links, and contact info so jobseekers can connect one-on-one with company representatives.

Employers will represent a large range of industries, including construction, management, administrative/clerical, warehouse, sales, customer service, manufacturing, banking, computer tech/IT and others.

Event sponsors include 50plus LIFE; American Legion Department of Pennsylvania; Church & Dwight Co., Inc.; BusinessWoman magazine; Disabled American Veterans; Pennsylvania State Headquarters VFW; and WHTM abc27.

Sponsorship and exhibitor opportunities are still available. For more information, call (717) 285-1350 or email info@onlinepub.com.


SOURCE: news release

Beat It: an 8-week Veterans Group beginning Sepember 3

BEAT it Group Flyer

Breathe Again Counseling Services, LLC and Take Heart Counseling and Equine Assisted Therapy announce this opportunity for veterans who need help, to get help. We are running a therapeutic group starting Thursday September 3rd for 8 weeks. Charlene Shutika will be co-facilitating the two hour long group along with Take Heart’s very own, Dr. David Brant, LPC, PsyD. Dr. Brant’s interest in the veteran population comes not from serving, but from his first hand experiences with the draft for Vietnam. The group will only run for 1.5 hours. The last half hour will be a time to gather around the pavilion and eat a meal together. We will be addressing proper reintegration because being home is harder than being deployed, emotion regulation because emotions were not allowed so we don’t know how to have them, the effects of trauma on the physical body (IBS, pain, the trauma brain), effective communication skills and knowing that you can have an opinion, and whatever else comes up. We will be using the theory of Natural Lifemanship or Trauma-Focused Equine-Assisted-Psychotherapy (TF-EAP) to guide the group through mounted and unmounted activities which have been shown to be beneficial for in the moment experiential learning versus traditional talk therapy alone.

The goal of the group is to build skills to handle the things that get thrown at them in civilian life and a lasting community for those veterans so if they fall on hard times or start to have suicidal thoughts, they have someone they can trust to call. It’s also so that veterans don’t feel alone.

Breathe Again Counseling Services, LLC – Call 484.205.9887 – Being a veteran gives me a unique perspective and helps me build a stronger relationship to help veterans through various trials in their life so they can breathe again. Being trauma informed and working towards becoming Trauma Certified guides the focus of my practice, but helping veterans is my priority so whether you have PTSD, Anxiety or Depression, or going through a life change, please feel free to contact me. Breathe again offers individual counseling services in-person or via telehealth and will be starting group services up in January 2020. For rates and more information please visit https://www.breatheagaincounselingservices.com/ 

Take Heart Counseling & Equine Assisted Therapy – Take Heart’s mission is to empower individuals and families to find hope, healing, and wholeness through therapeutic work with horses. They integrate principles of Christian counseling, trauma-informed psychotherapy, and natural horsemanship in experiential sessions designed to bring deep healing and insight to mind, body, and soul. The outdoor farm environment is peaceful and authentic, bringing a different, down-to-earth feel to counseling sessions. No horse experience necessary – the horses are gentle and intuitive partners in healing. Contact us.

Are you a veteran? Are you eligible to be buried at Fort Indiantown Gap National Cemetery?

FIGThe Pennsylvania Veterans’ Memorial at Indiantown Gap National Cemetery.

Burial in a national cemetery is open to all members of the armed forces who have met a minimum active duty service requirement and were discharged under conditions other than dishonorable. A Veteran’s spouse, widow or widower, minor dependent children, and under certain conditions, unmarried adult children with disabilities may also be eligible for burial. Eligible spouses and children may be buried even if they predecease the Veteran. Members of the reserve components of the armed forces who die while on active duty or who die while on training duty, or were eligible for retired pay, may also be eligible for burial. For more information visit our eligibility web page.

Military OneSource Financial Readiness Discussions Webinar link-up for June

Check out these upcoming events. The Personal Financial Counselor and Military OneSource State Consultant will bring the information and resources you need for financial success. To join us, download the Zoom app or go to the Zoom website and use the links provided. A Zoom account with password is NOT required. RSVPs appreciated.

military one source

 

“lonlieness and the absence of touch” | COVID-19 yields

covid senior despair(Hannah Norman / KHN Illustration)

by Judith Graham

“As states relax coronavirus restrictions, older adults are advised, in most cases, to keep sheltering in place. But for some, the burden of isolation and uncertainty is becoming hard to bear.

“This ‘stay at home awhile longer’ advice recognizes that older adults are more likely to become critically ill and die if infected with the virus. At highest risk are seniors with underlying medical conditions such as heart, lung or autoimmune diseases.

“Yet after two months at home, many want to go out into the world again. It is discouraging for them to see people of other ages resume activities. They feel excluded. Still, they want to be safe.”

Click here to read this Kaiser Health Network article in its entirety.


“Losing Touch: Another Drawback of the COVID-19 Pandemic” – The Scientist

“Affectionate touches tap into the nervous system’s rest and digest mode, reducing the release of stress hormones, bolstering the immune system, and stimulating brainwaves linked with relaxation.”

by Ashley Yeager | in The Scientist

“It had been seven weeks since I’d touched another human being. Arms outstretched, I walked quickly toward my dad, craving his embrace. In the instant before we touched, we paused, our minds probably running quick, last-minute calculations on the risk of physical contact. But, after turning our faces away from each other and awkwardly shuffling closer, we finally connected. Wrapped in my dad’s bear hug, I momentarily forgot we were in the midst of the worst global crisis I have ever experienced.

“’Touch is the most powerful safety signal of togetherness,’ says Steve Cole, a psychiatrist and biobehavioral scientist at the University of California, Los Angeles.”

To continue reading this article at The Scientist, click here.

“COVID-19 and the loneliness of American heroism” – Task & Purpose

warrior

by Peter Lucier

“A few hours after my friend was blown up by the side of the road in southern Helmand Province, I went to the gym. By gym, I mean the wooden squat rack with a rusted barbell and some upright seats made of 2x4s, covered by a dusty tan tarp on which camel spiders crawled, waiting to drop on the unsuspecting. My lifting partner Zach and I went through the same routine we had gone through for the last six months. I think it was a chest day. Members of other platoons occasionally poked their heads in on their way to our platoon’s tent to offer their condolences. We tried to be as gracious as we could, but were anxious to get back to our workout.

“A short month later, I came home. Instead of fellow Marines checking in on me, I was surrounded by civilians. It was hard to connect with them. War had cost me pieces of myself I would never get back, cost me friends I would never get back. I had spent months disassociating myself from basic empathy in order to survive, in order to kill, but now empathy was exactly what I needed. When someone tried their best to check on me, I thought they couldn’t possibly understand. I couldn’t summon the charity to accept their attempt to connect with me. I was too angry.”Click here to continue reading this article at Task &  Purpose.

 

New resource for reaching veterans with behavioral health conditions

older veteran behavioral

Click to download this New resource for reaching veterans with behavioral health conditions: In a collaborative initiative with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, we helped create a new overview of the programs, services, and agencies helping veterans with a variety of behavioral health issues.

The Keys to Effective Telemedicine for Older Adults – Institute for Healthcare Improvement

Telemedicine Older Adults

by Laurence Solberg 

“I started using telemedicine around 13 years ago as a geriatrician for the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). I used it mostly for following up with patients after discharge from a Geriatric Evaluation and Management (GEM) Unit, which served as a longer-term rehabilitation unit that we had in our hospital.

“I’ve seen how the VA has used telemedicine over the years, using numerous different platforms. They’ve used encrypted telephones that involved calling from a central location in a medical facility and video chat that required placement of equipment during a home visit.

“We’ve run the gamut from using basic landline telephones to HIPAA-secure video-conferencing programs. These days, we sometimes place tablets in the home when the patient does not have access to a smartphone.

“As more primary care is being shifted away from office visits during the COVID-19 pandemic, I’m now using my telemedicine experience and training as a geriatrician to help the VA use the 4Ms Framework for Age-Friendly Care to improve care for older adults.

Continue reading this article at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, click here.

 

“What Is Long-Term Care?” – National Institute on Aging

“Long-term care involves a variety of services designed to meet a person’s health or personal care needs during a short or long period of time. These services help people live as independently and safely as possible when they can no longer perform everyday activities on their own.”

who needs long term care

“Long-term care is provided in different places by different caregivers, depending on a person’s needs. Most long-term care is provided at home by unpaid family members and friends. It can also be given in a facility such as a nursing home or in the community, for example, in an adult day care center.

“The most common type of long-term care is personal care—help with everyday activities, also called “activities of daily living.” These activities include bathing, dressing, grooming, using the toilet, eating, and moving around—for example, getting out of bed and into a chair.

“Long-term care also includes community services such as meals, adult day care, and transportation services. These services may be provided free or for a fee.”

Click here to read this article in its entirety.