Category Archives: Trauma

“Trauma-Informed is Messy Business … ” – ACES Connection

messy trauma informed

by Tanya Fritz

“Words like trauma-informed and resiliency get thrown around a lot these days.  And for many, the visions they call up are a bit too glossy.  You see resiliency and trauma-informed aren’t always pretty.  Resiliency can look like closing the bathroom door and collapsing in tears… but then washing your face and going back into the world, carrying the belief that you can survive and the hope that things will get better.

“It looks like begrudgingly going on that walk with a friend, when the little voice inside is yelling at you to just grab a bag of chips and curl up on the couch with Netflix.  Heck, you might even go back to the couch after the walk.  It means saying the wrong thing, then being brave enough to go back and apologize.  Resiliency doesn’t mean that life doesn’t get you down, that you don’t still stumble, or that you don’t sometimes still make the wrong choice.

“Resiliency means that all of that happens, and through support and self-regulation, you are able to continue to keep moving forward.  Even if every day isn’t always better than the last, your overall trajectory is still forward.  Resiliency is a journey full of twists and turns.  We make get off track, but we ultimately know where we are headed.”

Keep reading this article, click here.

“Can people be saved from a terrible childhood?” – The Guardian

“US researchers have found early intervention can help prevent negative experiences in infancy turning into long-term health risks”

terrible childhood Illustration: Nathalie Lees

by Lauren Zanolli in New Orleans

“When Sabrina Bugget-Kellum walked into a neighbourhood clinic in New York for a routine appointment in in 2016, she was desperateHer son was in prison. She was trying to look after his two young children, who were aged one and two. Their mother was emotionally unstable. Bugget-Kellum did not want the chaos of the adults’ lives passed down to another generation.

“‘We didn’t know if they would be safe with their mother,’ she recalled recently. ‘I began to pray, please God, I need some help. There were so many things going on.’

“While at the clinic, Bugget-Kellum learned about a new parenting programme designed for carers of young children who have faced early adversity such as domestic abuse, homelessness or the loss of a parent to incarceration. ‘It was like I had my ammunition and I knew how to fight,’ said Bugget-Kellum of the programme.”

At bottom there is a revolutionary idea. It’s about moving from ‘what’s wrong with you?’ to ‘what happened to you?’ – Leslie Lieberman

Click here to continue reading this article at The Guardian.