“As Vietnam Veterans Age, Hospices Aim to Meet Their Needs” – The New York Times

“In addition to high rates of disability and psychological issues, some vets facing the end of life are confronting long-suppressed memories of the traumas of war.”

vn veterans hospiceCredit…Nick Hagen for The New York Times

“When Timothy Hellrung was told he had aggressive cancer this past June and had only days or weeks to live, he knew where he wanted to die.

“Mr. Hellrung, a 73-year-old veteran of the Vietnam War disabled by Agent Orange, spent his last 10 days in hospice care at the community living center of the V.A. Ann Arbor Healthcare System in Michigan. The staff provided him with a roomy suite. A social worker wheeled in a bed for his wife of 44 years, Brenda, and gave her pajamas so she could be comfortable spending every night with him.

“‘The V.A. became family to us,’ Ms. Hellrung said. On his first day in hospice, a roomful of veterans honored Mr. Hellrung by placing a pin on his clothing with the American flag and the words ‘thank you for your service.’”

Click here to continue reading this New York Times article in its entirety.


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This Link to Aging and Disability Resources partner agency, the South Central Veteran Community Partnership, is “a coalition of VA facilities; Community health providers, organizations and agencies; and Veterans and their caregivers.”

Many Link partner agencies are also Veteran Community Partnership agencies.

Veterans Day, 2019 & the history of Veterans Day

va poster

History of Veterans Day

World War I – known at the time as “The Great War” – officially ended when the Treaty of Versailles was signed on June 28, 1919, in the Palace of Versailles outside the town of Versailles, France. However, fighting ceased seven months earlier when an armistice, or temporary cessation of hostilities, between the Allied nations and Germany went into effect on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month. For that reason, November 11, 1918, is generally regarded as the end of “the war to end all wars.”

Continuing reading, click here.

A profile of older U.S. veterans – National Council on Aging

“There are more than 11 million adults aged 60 and older alive today who have served in the military, representing over 15% of the 60+ population. It is important to learn more about this population to identify how they are faring during retirement and to identify their needs. To pursue this goal, the National Council on Aging and the Leading Age LTSS Center @ Umass Boston analyzed data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) to learn about the health and economic characteristics of the older veteran population.”

profile older veterans

“Services Address Wandering in Those with Memory Impairment” – 50plus LIFE

wandering

by Megan Joyce 

“For caregivers of people with memory issues, keeping their loved one in a safe space — whether it’s their home or a care facility — is vital to the person’s well-being. But the reality is that 6 in 10 people with dementia will wander away from that safe space at least once.

“Someone with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia may wander as a result of agitation, confusion, anxiety, overstimulation, or the belief that they are searching for something. They may become disoriented and attempt to relive the past or revive past habits, such as going to work or returning to a familiar neighborhood.

“While wandering, the person might not recall their name or address, making it difficult for those who encounter the person to assess their needs and return them to safety.

“Clay Jacobs, vice president of programs and services for the Alzheimer’s Association Greater Pennsylvania Chapter, said anyone who has memory problems and is able to walk is at risk for wandering, even in the early stages of dementia. There are certain behaviors, however, that are red flags indicating wandering is more likely to occur.”

Continue reading this article at 50 plus LIFE in its entirety.


The publisher of 50plus LIFE, On-Line Publishers, Inc. is a Link to Aging and Disability Resource as are these entities mentioned in the article.

  • Alzheimer’s association® – Greater Pennsylvania Chapter – 706 Rothsville Road, Lititz PA 17543.  24/7 Helpline # – 1.800.272.3900 – “Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health.”  Call our Helpline for resources in your area.
  • On-Line Publishers, Inc. – On-Line Publishers, Inc. has more than 15 years’ experience in serving boomers, seniors, disabled, caregivers, and their families by providing relevant information utilizing a variety of platforms. Talk to us about our print and digital editions of 50plus Senior News50plus Senior Living, and the Resource Directory for Caregivers, Aging, and Disabled, and Caregiver Solutions. Or learn more about our annual 50plus EXPOs. For more click: www.onlinepub.com.
  • The Pilot Club of Lancaster, Inc. / Project Lifesaver® – This service club works closely with the local police departments to provide Project Lifesaver; an emergency response program for individual who may wander.

50plus LIFE is an award-winning publication published monthly, providing individuals 50 and over in the Susquehanna and Delaware valleys with timely and relevant information pertinent to their needs and interests. Editions in Chester, Cumberland, Dauphin, Lancaster, Lebanon, and York counties.


 

 

New World Health Organization (WHO) Online Training Programme on Healthy Ageing

decade of healthy aging

“Registration open for the first-ever WHO Online Training Programme on Healthy Ageing!

This training programme will equip policy-makers at all levels, UN staff and civil society representatives with the necessary tools and skills to develop concrete responses to foster Healthy Ageing in their respective contexts. Participants will learn from experts and peers from around the world, discover new resources and evidence, and develop the competencies that will allow them to become change agents in their countries or communities as part of the Decade of Healthy Ageing.

The course is available in English for free and will run for 14 weeks from 13 January 2020. Registration is open until 20 November 2019.

Click here to register and become a leader on ageing!

Housing costs ease for homeowners; not for renters

HOUSING

by Christopher Mazur

The housing cost burden has eased for U.S. homeowners but remained stagnant for renters since the peak of the recession in 2008.

“Recently released data from the American Community Survey (ACS) estimates the percentage of “burdened” households, or those that spend at least 35% of their monthly income on housing costs, and provides a 10-year look at the trends from 2008 to 2018.

“Burden Depends on Mortgage Status

“There were 77.7 million owner-occupied housing units in the United States in 2018. Approximately 62% of these homeowners had a mortgage, down 6.5 percentage points from 2008.

“the homeowner spends 35% or more of their monthly household income on mortgage payments, utility bills, real estate taxes, property insurance, and any required condominium or mobile home fees.”

Click here to read this article in its entirety at the US Census Bureau Website.

 

 

What’s behind the “OK, Boomer” surge

“A word to the youngs: The shiny tools of modernity will always fall prey to the ancient flaws of humanity.” – extracted from this New York Times opinion piece about US Representative Katie Hill’s resignation statement during which she stated:

“The forces of revenge by a bitter jealous man, cyber exploitation and sexual shaming that target our gender and a large segment of society that fears and hates powerful women have combined to push a young woman out of power and say that she doesn’t belong here.”

ok boomer

It’s somewhat scary that this intergenerational conflict was a central theme in the 2011 novel by Albert Brooks.

This New York Times article (‘OK Boomer’ Marks the End of Friendly Generational Relations – Now it’s war: Gen Z has finally snapped over climate change and financial inequality.)


Ok Boomer: Cool or Not Cool?

“Ok Boomer” merch sent us through a range of emotions from indignation and outrage to wanting to reach out. Ultimately we asked: Is it worth the fight? – Weareagisy.com

“Adding a Dental Benefit to Medicare: Addressing Racial Disparities”

“This brief describes the racial disparities in access to oral health and oral health outcomes. Coverage is a key factor in reducing the existing disparities. This brief proposes adding oral health as a Medicare benefit as a potential solution. It also proposes additional policy options aimed at reducing disparities beyond expanding oral health coverage,”

dental care

Click on the graphic to read the report as a .pdf file.

“Elusive Zzzzzzzs: Setting back clock won’t erase sleep deficit nagging older adults” – The Boston Globe

ADULT SLEEPDr. Sanford Auerbach, director of sleep disorders at Boston Medical Center, checked on the fit of a CPAP mask.” JOHN TLUMACKI / GLOBE STAFF/GLOBE STAFF

by Robert Weisman

“Will you enjoy an extra hour of sleep when daylight saving time ends Sunday?

“Many sleep-deprived seniors, after dutifully setting back their clocks Saturday night, will mark the occasion doing what they’re often doing in the wee hours: tossing and turning, nudging snoring spouses, and fretting about being awake.

“It’s a cruel irony for older adults. At a time of life when they should be able to relax, after decades of raising children and trudging to work, falling and staying asleep are more challenging than ever. Chalk it up to rising anxiety, changing circadian rhythms, and unhealthy habits, ranging from late-day caffeine and alcohol intake to nonstop digital interruptions.”

Continue reading this article in its entirety at The Boston Globe, click here.

WebMD / JAHF Survey Finds Older Adults and Their Caregivers are Misinformed

Care of older adults is mired in misinformation, with most older patients and caregivers mistakenly believing that sharp declines in quality of life are inevitable, according to a new survey from The John A. Hartford Foundation (JAHF) and WebMD. Driving Towards Age-Friendly Care for the Future, a survey of more than 2,700 older patients and caregivers, found:

  • More than 40% of respondents believe depression is an inevitable part of aging;
  • Three in four older adults are not aware that they have the right to ask for, and receive, health care that is tailored to what matters to them;
  • Nearly 40% of respondents did not know that some prescription medications can impact cognition.

age friendly

The survey underscores the importance of the Age-Friendly Health Systems initiative, a national movement led by JAHF and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, in partnership with the American Hospital Association and the Catholic Health Association of the US, which is helping hospitals and health systems provide age-friendly care that focuses on the 4Ms.”

  • Read more about the survey findings;
  • Learn more about the Age-Friendly Health Systems initiative.