Lebanon VA Medical Center announces the first “Building the Bridge” event | other dates and venues announced, too.

VA building the bridge

The first session of the Building the Bridge Series is scheduled for March 8, 2019.  Enrollment will be available and onsite throughout the event.  This event will be held at the U.S. Army Heritage Education Center (Carlisle PA), where we look forward to collaborating with key stakeholders from the Veteran community pertaining to supports and resources in Cumberland, Dauphin and Perry Counties.

This year’s topics include:

  • Transition from Uniformed Services to Civilian Life: The common challenges in the transition process for both the Veteran and the family.
  • Substance Use & Abuse: Identifying when someone is using drugs &/or alcohol to cope, how to respond and where to turn for help.
  • Suicide Prevention: When warning signs of suicide begin to emerge & how family can help.  Discussion pertaining to supports & local initiatives.
  • Serving the Whole Veteran from a Wrap Around Perspective: Connecting Veterans before, during and after VA care with community partnerships.

Please join us for education, collaborative discussion and round-table sessions to further develop, strengthen and sustain working relationships.

Registration: https://08mar19cmhs.eventbrite.com

Disability impacts ALL of US.

Click here | To see a snapshot of disability in Pennsylvania

persons with a disability

61 million adults in the United States live with a disability
  • 26 percent (one in 4) of adults in the United States have some type of disability.
  • The percentage of people living with disabilities is highest in the South.
Percentage of adults with functional disability types:
  • 13.7 percent of people with a disability have a mobility disability with serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs.
  • 10.8 percent of people with a disability have a cognition disability with serious difficulty concentrating, remembering or making decisions.
  • 6.8 percent of people with a disability have an independent living disability with difficulty doing errands alone.
  • 5.9 percent of people with a disability are deaf or have serious difficulty hearing
  • 4.6 percent of people with a disability have a vision disability with blindness or serious difficulty seeing even when wearing glasses.
  • 3.6 percent of people with a disability have a self-care disability with difficulty dressing or bathing.
Disability and communities.

Disability is especially common in these groups, older adults, women and minorites.

  • 2 in 5 adults age 65 years and older have a disability
  • 1 in 4 women have a disability.
  • 2 in 5 non-Hispanic American Indians/ Alaska Natives have a disability.
Disability and health.

Adults living with disabilities are more likely to be obese, smoke, have heart disease and diabetes:

  • 38.2 percent of adults with a disability are obese while 26.2 percent of adults without a disability are obese.
  • 28.2 percent of adults with a disability smoke while 13.4 percent of adults without a disability smoke.
  • 11.5 percent of adults with a disability have heart disease while 3.8 percent of adults without a disability have heart disease.
  • 16.3 percent of adults with a disability have diabetes while 7.2 percent of adults with a disability have diabetes.
Disability and Health Care Access

Health care access barriers for working-age adults include

  • 1 in 3 adults with disabilities 18 to 44 years do not have a usual health care provider
  • 1 in 3 adults with disabilities 18 to 44 years have an unmet health care need because of cost in the past year
  • 1 in 4 adults with disabilities 45 to 64 years did not have a routine check-up in the past year
Making a difference.

Public health is for all of us.

Join CDC and its partners as we work together to improve the health of people living with disabilities.
CDC and its partners work together to improve the lives of people with disabilities by:

  • Promoting healthy living,
  • Monitoring public health data
  • Researching and reducing health disparities
  • Building inclusive health program
  • Improving access to health care.

Brought to you by the National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Contact us: disabilityandhealthbranch@cdc.gov

Twitter: @cdc_ncbddd

References

  1. Okoro CA, Hollis ND, Cyrus AC, Griffin-Blake S.  Prevalence of Disabilities and Health Care Access by Disability Status and Type Among Adults — United States, 2016.  MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2018;67:882–887. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6732a3External.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Disability and Health Data System (DHDS) [Internet]. [updated 2018 May 24; cited 2018 August 27]. Available from: http://dhds.cdc.gov

“Have you caught a catfish? Online dating can be deceptive” – The Conversation

Lest you think this cannot happen here in the Berks-Lancaster-Lebanon Counties area, do not be deluded. Romance scams do happen here and we have evidence that some people have lost lots of money in the pursuit of companionship. The Federal Bureau of Investigation warns about “Romance Scams | Online Imposters Break Hearts and Bank Accounts.”

 

catfishing

“On the internet, you can become anyone you want to – at least for a while. And though deception doesn’t fit well with lasting romance, people lie all the time: Fewer than a third of people in one survey claimed they were always honest in online interactions, and nearly nobody expected others to be truthful. Much of the time, lies are meant to make the person telling them seem better somehow – more attractive, more engaging or otherwise worth getting to know.

“‘Catfishing’ is a more advanced effort of digital deception. Named in a 2010 movie that later expanded into an MTV reality series, a catfish is a person who sets up an intentionally fake profile on one or more social network sites, often with the purpose of defrauding or deceiving other users.

“It happens more than people might think – and to more people than might believe it. Many times in my own personal life when I was seeking to meet people online, I found that someone was being deceptive. In one case, I did a Google image search and found a man’s profile picture featured on a site called ‘Romance Scams.’ ”

You can read this article in its entirety at The Conversation, click here.

Are you “ageist?” Find out here.

Ageism is the stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination against people on the basis of their age. Ageism is widespread and an insidious practice which has harmful effects on the health of older adults. For older people, ageism is an everyday challenge. Overlooked for employment, restricted from social services and stereotyped in the media, ageism marginalizes and excludes older people in their communities.

“Ageism is everywhere, yet it is the most socially ‘normalized’ of any prejudice, and is not widely countered – like racism or sexism. These attitudes lead to the marginalization of older people within our communities and have negative impacts on their health and well-being.” – SOURCE: World Health Organization

Watch this 11 1/2 minute TEDTalk and for a look at ageism in this country.

agism

“Take the Ageing Attitudes Quiz as a first step in your Stand Against Ageism. Check your attitudes against these commonly held views of ageing and older persons and find out how much you know about ageing and older people.”

“Time for a Manhattan Project on Alzheimer’s” – The Conversation

by Marc Diamond

“Imagine if Alzheimer’s was treated like other common diseases. Instead of worrying about the prospect of slowly losing your memory, you might get a series of shots during middle age to prevent the onset of this neurological nightmare, just as we do to reduce the risk of flu. Or you could take a daily pill as many do to control their cholesterol or blood pressure.

alz reportIn Alzheimer’s, toxic clumps of protein kill brain cells which shrinks the size of the brain as the disease progresses. BlueRingMedia/Shutterstock.com

“That may sound improbable, given the long string of Alzheimer’s drugs that have failed to work in clinical trials, but I remain optimistic. As a physician-scientist leading research into the causes of neurodegenerative diseases, I believe that we are making significant progress on uncovering the roots of Alzheimer’s.

“Alzheimer’s is a neurodegenerative disease that has stymied researchers for years. The disease develops when two proteins – A-beta and tau – accumulate in the brain. A-beta builds up outside of nerve cells, and tau inside them. Decades of study suggests that A-beta somehow leads to the accumulation of tau, which is what causes nerve cells to die. This may explain why early treatments focusing exclusively on A-beta failed. These ideas have led to new diagnostic criteria that take into account these two proteins to make the definitive diagnosis.”

Continue reading this article, click here.

“What you need to know about sleep medications, their side effects and other issues” – The Washington Post

sleep(Zach Meyer for The Washington Post)

by Jill U. Adams

“A lot of people out there don’t get enough sleep — more than 1 in 3 American adults, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“If you’re one of them, you probably know there are two main treatments for improving sleep: behavioral methods and medications.

“When you’re desperate for a good night’s sleep, medications sure do sound appealing. But there are caveats with them all — the prescription pills, the over-the-counter products and the herbal supplements.

“Before describing the medications in detail, I’ll remind you that the prevailing wisdom is that cognitive behavioral therapy, which involves changing habits and bedtime rituals, is the first-line treatment for insomnia. Sleep experts say CBT is more effective and longer lasting than medication for most people — but maybe you’re not most people.”

Click here to read this Washington Post article in its entirety.

 

“Unnecessary ED visits from chronically ill patients cost $8.3 billion” – Modern Healthcare

er visits

by Maria Castellucci

“About 30% of emergency department visits among patients with common chronic conditions are potentially unnecessary, leading to $8.3 billion in additional costs for the industry, according to a new analysis.

“The report, released Thursday by Premier, found that six common chronic conditions accounted for 60% of 24 million ED visits in 2017; out of that 60%, about a third of those visits—or 4.3 million—were likely preventable and could be treated in a less expensive outpatient setting.

“The frequency of unnecessary ED visits from the chronically ill is unsurprising given the fee-for-service payment environment the majority of providers remain in, said Joe Damore, senior vice president of population health consulting at Premier. On average, only 10% of providers’ payment models are tied to value-based models, he said, so providers don’t have an incentive to effectively manage patients to prevent disease progression and promote wellness.”

“Why the US has higher drug prices than other countries” – The Conversation

Rx sales 2

“Spending on pharmaceuticals is on the rise worldwide. And it well should be. Today, we are able to cure some diseases like hepatitis C that were virtual death sentences just a few years ago. This progress required significant investments by governments and private companies alike. Unquestionably, the world is better off for it.

“Unfortunately, as President Trump pointed out in the State of the Union address, the United States has borne a significant amount of the negative effects associated with this development. For one, its regulatory apparatus has focused largely on drug safety, yet regulators have failed to emphasize cost-effectiveness when it comes to both new and existing drugs.

“At the same time, the United States also pays significantly higher prices than the rest of the developed world when it comes to prescription drugs, due primarily to limited competition among drug companies.”

Read this article at The Conversation in its entirety, click here.


Read this related article: “Paying for Prescription Drugs Around the World: Why Is the U.S. an Outlier?” The Commonwealth Fund

“25 Common Nursing Home Problems and How to Resolve Them” – JusticeinAging.org

“This reader-friendly guide covers 25 common nursing home problems encountered by residents and their families. These problems occur in nursing homes across the country. Even the supposedly “good” nursing homes often follow procedures that violate federal laws and harm residents. Knowing your rights and having the tools to force or push nursing home staff and management to follow the law can make all the difference.

“Whether you are a nursing home resident, a family member, or a supportive friend, this guide gives you the tools you need to identify and then resolve the problems that residents most frequently face. Your determined advocacy can be the difference between going-through-the-motions nursing home care, and the high quality, person-centered care that residents are promised by federal law.”

25 common nursing home

Read the Guide

 

“Trauma-Informed is Messy Business … ” – ACES Connection

messy trauma informed

by Tanya Fritz

“Words like trauma-informed and resiliency get thrown around a lot these days.  And for many, the visions they call up are a bit too glossy.  You see resiliency and trauma-informed aren’t always pretty.  Resiliency can look like closing the bathroom door and collapsing in tears… but then washing your face and going back into the world, carrying the belief that you can survive and the hope that things will get better.

“It looks like begrudgingly going on that walk with a friend, when the little voice inside is yelling at you to just grab a bag of chips and curl up on the couch with Netflix.  Heck, you might even go back to the couch after the walk.  It means saying the wrong thing, then being brave enough to go back and apologize.  Resiliency doesn’t mean that life doesn’t get you down, that you don’t still stumble, or that you don’t sometimes still make the wrong choice.

“Resiliency means that all of that happens, and through support and self-regulation, you are able to continue to keep moving forward.  Even if every day isn’t always better than the last, your overall trajectory is still forward.  Resiliency is a journey full of twists and turns.  We make get off track, but we ultimately know where we are headed.”

Keep reading this article, click here.