“The Ethics of Adjusting Your Assets to Qualify for Medicaid” – a column at The New York Times

medicaid

Credit Robert Neubecker for The New York Times

by Ron Lieber

“At any given moment, there is a large group of citizens who want nothing more than to make absolutely certain that they are impoverished enough to qualify for Medicaid sooner rather than later. Someday, you might be one of them.

“Welcome to the (perfectly legal) world of Medicaid planning, the plain-vanilla term for the mini-industry of lawyers and others who help people arrange their financial lives so they don’t spend every last dime on a nursing home. Once properly impoverished under the law, then Medicaid, which gets funding both from your state and the federal government, picks up the tab.

“Whatever twists and turns the health insurance debates in Washington take, Medicaid will be at the center, and the program will probably affect you and your family more than you know. After all, if you run out of money in retirement, it is Medicaid that pays for most of your nursing home or home-based care.”

Click here to continue reading this column at The New York Times.

“The little red pill being pushed on the elderly | CNN investigation exposes inappropriate use of drug in nursing homes”

red pills

 

by Blake Ellis and Melanie Hicken; Data analysis by Sergio Hernandez, CNN Investigates

“The maker of a little red pill intended to treat a rare condition is raking in hundreds of millions of dollars a year as it aggressively targets frail and elderly nursing home residents for whom the drug may be unnecessary or even unsafe, a CNN investigation has found.

“And much of the money is coming straight from the federal government. The pill, called Nuedexta, is approved to treat a disorder marked by sudden and uncontrollable laughing or crying — known as pseudobulbar affect, or PBA. This condition afflicts less than 1% of all Americans, based on a calculation using the drugmaker’s own figures, and it is most commonly associated with people who have multiple sclerosis (MS) or ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.”

Continue reading this CNN report, click here.

“Temporary Assistance for Needy Families | The Rapid Re-housing demonstration has completed its first year – 22 families who experienced homelessness were rapidly re-housed.”

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Rapid re-housing is a promising intervention designed to quickly connect families and pregnant women temporarily experiencing homelessness to permanent housing and services. Studies show significant gains in long-term success and housing stability when a family is able to quickly leave homeless shelters and get stabilized immediately.

A YEAR AGO, the Department of Human Services partnered with the City of Philadelphia’s Office of Homeless Services to administer this demonstration over a two-year period in West Philadelphia. The first participating families were rapidly re-housed and connected to needed services and employment with the goal of helping them attain self-sufficiency and ultimately reduce or eliminate their need for assistance in the future. In addition to receiving permanent housing, all 22 families from Year One received housing stabilization services, which included the completion of a stabilization plan. All of the families also received job development services, and as a result, 33 percent of families exiting the program also increased their income. As more families exit the program, we anticipate the growth of increased-income families to reach to 50 percent. All families who have exited the program thus far have remained in stable housing.

YEAR TWO OF THIS DEMONSTRATION started July 1, 2017, and will rapidly re-house 28 TANF-eligible families experiencing homelessness. Upon exiting the program, additional emphasis will be placed on securing employment and increasing income to better ensure families can maintain housing. Program evaluation and data collection will continue for 12 months. The demonstration is evaluated on a variety of performance measures to inform future efforts and explore best practices to better serve vulnerable TANF-eligible families experiencing homelessness.

SUCCESS STORIES

Ms. W entered the TANF Program as a single female with a child. Ms. W’s highest grade of education is 11th grade and her monthly entry income was $316. Ms. W obtained employment but had to resign when she became pregnant. After giving birth, Ms. W obtained full-time employment and increased her income from $316 to more than $1,000 a month, contingent upon an increase in hours. When the subsidy ended, she was able to maintain her rent without assistance. She also receives SNAP benefits to supplement food for her family. The Housing Stabilization Specialist negotiated a reduction in the rent from $900 to $800. Ms. W is still in the same apartment and is paying her rent independently.

Ms. J entered the TANF Program as a single female with an adopted child. Ms. J’s income at the beginning of the program was $480 a month adoption assistance. Ms. J is also partially disabled, but was not receiving disability payments when she entered the program. Ms. J did not have full use of her left arm which caused her to lose her job and, consequently, become homeless. The Housing Stabilization Specialist requested a rent reduction from $900 to $800 a month. Ms. J is currently employed through her church making $50 to $75 plus tips, varying by engagement. Due to her partial disability, she is in the process of getting her SSI/SSDI benefits. Ms. J also receives SNAP benefits to supplement food for the family. Ms. J is still in her apartment and is paying her rent independently.

SOURCES: Pennsylvania Department of Human Services / City of Philadelphia

 

“Watch Your Mailbox: A Guide to Open Enrollment [Part 1]”

This article is the first installment in our 2017 “Preparing for Open Enrollment” series. To stay up-to-date on the latest Open Enrollment blog posts, subscribe to our mailing list. For a complete overview of Open Enrollment, check out our “Guide to Open Enrollment” page.

medicare enrollment

“It’s finally fall! For many people, that means football, foliage, and delicious pumpkin-flavored treats. For Medicare recipients, fall also signals a slightly-less-fun (but equally important) event: the annual Medicare Open Enrollment Period (OEP). Open Enrollment occurs every year from October 15th to December 7th. During Open Enrollment, anyone with Medicare can change their prescription drug plan or Medicare Advantage plan for any reason.

“You may be thinking, ‘But I already chose my Medicare plan! Why change plans and go through all that again?’”

Click here to read this article in its entirety.

Read the second OEP blog post: “Gather Your Things: Preparing for Open Enrollment [Part Two] »

Read the third OEP blog post: “Go Shopping: Preparing for Open Enrollment [Part Three] »

“Five things that might surprise you about the fastest-growing segment of the housing market” – The Urban Institute

rentals

“One of the most pronounced shifts in the housing market since the financial crisis has been the evolution of the single-family rental (SFR) market. Today, single-family rentals (one-unit, attached and detached) account for 35 percent of the country’s 44 million rental units, compared with 31 percent in 2006. More than half of renters live in structures with less than four units.

“The Urban Institute’s Housing Finance Policy Center recently hosted a panel discussion with three single-family rental experts: Douglas Bendt from Investability, Sandeep Bordia from Amherst Capital Management, and Calvin Schnure from the National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts (NAREIT). Their conversation illuminated five important facts everyone should know about this growing market:

“1. Single-family rental is the fastest-growing segment of the housing market.

“Growth in SFRs has outpaced growth of single-family owner and all multifamily housing in recent years. Data from NAREIT shows the SFR sector has seen growth every year since the crisis and has lingered around a 30 percent growth rate for the past three years, compared with less than a 15 percent growth rate for the multifamily market during that same period. The single-family owner market began to grow again in 2016, after declining for seven years.

“The number of households in the US is continuously increasing, but …”

To continue reading this article at The Urban Institute, click here.

Finding affordable housing – Senior Planet

Model home made of money

by Greg Perlman

“It’s no secret that we’re getting older. Over 76 million Americans are either at or approaching retirement age, and for some of us, getting older and retiring means getting poorer. More than 25 million Americans over 60 are economically insecure.

When you’re living on a fixed income, it can be a struggle to keep up with rising costs of living, and especially housing. Affordable housing programs exist, but how do you find the right program? And what does that process look like?

Click here to see a quick guide to options.

“Cancer Linked to Obesity” – Time Goes By: What it’s really like to get old

cancer weight

Read this column here.

Two agencies align with Service Area 13 Link partners’ networks

NEW PARTNERS

Berks County partners’ network

Lancaster County partners’ network

Lebanon County partners’ network

Over the past month, two more resources providers have aligned with the Pennsylvania Link to Aging and Disability Resources | Berks-Lancaster-Lebanon Service Area..

To align with the Berks-Lancaster-Lebanon Service Area as a partner entity costs nothing. The Pennsylvania Link to Aging and Disability Resources part of the national Aging and Disability Resources Center [ADRC) network.

For more information about how your agency, entity or organization can become a partner, text or call the Lead Link coordinator at 717.380.9714 or email blllink@mail.com.

Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRCs) are the first place to go to get accurate, unbiased information on all aspects of life related to aging or living with a disability.

Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRC) are a nationwide effort to take a seamless approach in the way we assist seniors and adults with disabilities who need help with activities of daily living. The ADRC in Pennsylvania is known as the Link.

HOW CAN THE LINK ASSIST YOU AND/OR YOUR FAMILY?

  • Easily connect you to local services/supports through any Link partner agency
  • Explore existing options to ensure a secure plan for independence
  • Assist consumers with applications to determine funding eligibility
  • Help consumers remain or return to their community because of a disability, an illness or accident, or to transition from an institution back to the community
There is no charge for information and assistance provided by any Link or Link partner agency.

PA LINK TO AGING AND DISABILITY RESOURCE CENTER TOLL FREE HElpLINE: 1-800-753-8827

Go Go Grandparents could be a transportation resource assist for some

A person from Lebanon County sent this in an email. Though not available in every part of the Berks-Lancaster-Lebanon Service area, this service may be an answer for some persons with transportation challenges.

gogoClick on the graphic to download the brochure.

GoGoGrandparent turns on demand transportation companies like Lyft into services that help families take better care of older adults.

Step 1: CALL 1 (855) 464-6872 and wait to hear “thanks for calling GoGoGrandparent”

Step 2:

PRESS 1 for a car to your home

PRESS 2 for a car to where we dropped you off last

PRESS 3, 4 or 5 for a car to a custom pick up location

PRESS 0 to speak with an operator

https://gogograndparent.com/

Friday Wrap-Up, October 6, 2017 | a message from the Secretary of Aging

Each week week the Office of the Secretary of Pennsylvania’s Department of Aging releases a Friday newsletter with information relevant to activities, issues and events for older Pennsylvanians and persons with disabilities across the Commonwealth. Click here to download the newsletter as a .pdf file.