“Out with nursing homes, in with home health care” – Crain’s Chicago Business

craine out with

“Northwestern Medicine may have found the one hospital market where investment in long-term care hasn’t paid off: affluent north suburban Lake Forest.

“Northwestern-owned Lake Forest Hospital recently applied to permanently shutter its long-term care unit, Westmoreland Nursing Center, citing increased operating costs, failure to adequately fill 84 beds and flood damage from mid-July.

“In its application to the Illinois Health Facilities & Services Review Board, which decides on health care projects to prevent duplicating services, Lake Forest Hospital noted that it originally planned to close the long-term care facility by the end of the year, but that heavy rain damaged the nursing home and forced early transfer of patients. The board received the hospital’s application to discontinue 660 N. Westmoreland Road on July 28.

“Although the number of people age 65 and up has swelled in recent years to the fastest growing population in the U.S. … “

Continue reading this article in Crain’s Chicago Business.

For those unexpected incidents – it’s better to have a plan. Do you have a plan?

Keystone 6

Several months ago, this site asked for volunteers for an emergency sheltering exercise; yesterday the Keystone 6 exercise became reality.

Everyone of us needs to know about life’s uncertainties, and the best way to grapple with uncertainty is to have a plan and to practice the plan.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMAs) “Plan & Prepare Webpage – This section of the site provides information on how you can plan and prepare to protect your family, property, and community from natural and manmade disasters is a start.

There are other resources right here at the Pennsylvania Link to Aging and Disability Resources | Berks-Lancaster-Lebanon Service Area Website.

  • We offer a 2 hour emergency preparedness planning workshop for FREE. The workshop, FEELING SAFE – BEING SAFE, provides tips and resources to help anyone develop a personal plan for emergency situations.

FSBS cover

 

“In one night, she lost two sons to opioids.” – STAT News

A Mom “is on a mission to spare others that unfathomable pain.”

opioid loss familyJustin, Nick, Matthew, and Jack Savage (from left) with their parents, Becky and Mike Savage, in Siesta Key, Fla., where the family regularly vacationed.

by Megan Thielking

“RANGER, Ind. — Becky Savage always starts her talks to students and parents the same way. She shows them pictures of her teenage sons, Nick and Jack, who loved hockey, Taco Bell, and late-night hangouts.

“Then, she tells them what happened on June 14, 2015.

“Savage was picking up dirty clothes from 18-year-old Jack’s room that Sunday morning. He was sleeping in after a night of graduation parties with Nick and other friends. Jack didn’t respond as she picked up his laundry. She shook him, but he didn’t wake up. She knew to check his pulse — she’s a nurse. He didn’t have one. She started CPR on her son and shouted for help.

“She heard sirens wail down their street. She watched a firefighter try to resuscitate Jack. She screamed at him when she saw him give up.”

Read this story in its entirety at STAT News; click here.

Many think that the opioid crisis is not their problem; read comments following articles in local media. The commenters think that overdoses are “druggie” problems, not theirs. The truth is that addiction crosses all demographics.

heroin faces

This recent People Magazine article features the pictures of some of the people who’ve died from opioid addiction – they are the faces of family members, neighbors, friendspeople just like ones you probably know … right here in Berks County, in Lancaster County and in Lebanon County.

 

“Why social smoking can be just as bad for you as daily smoking” – The Conversation

mind smokeSocial smoking is just as bad on your heart as regular smoking, a new study suggests. – California Department of Health Services, CC BY-NC-SA

by Bernadette Melnyk, Dean and Professor of Nursing, The Ohio State University

“‘Everything in moderation.’

“It’s a common justification made for behaviors that may fall outside the realm of healthy. Whether it’s a drink or two or indulging in a favorite dessert, consuming small quantities, rather than abject abstinence, is a more palatable and acceptable option for most people.

“The less-is-more approach may be sound when applied to many aspects of our frenzied daily lives, but when it comes to smoking, the same rationale cannot apply.

“A new study that I conducted with other nursing and health services researchers has found that those who enjoy the occasional cigarette in social situations are risking their health just as much as the person who smokes a pack or more a day.”

“Stop Treating 70- and 90-Year-Olds the Same” – New York Times opinion

not the sameHarry Campbell

“Every summer around this time, pediatricians’ offices are flooded with children getting the vaccines they need to start another year of school.

“Doctors base their advice on which shots patients should get when on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s vaccine recommendations. The guidelines are presented in two schedules, one for children, the other for adults, both divided into subgroups based on developmental biology and social behaviors common at different ages. Unfortunately, there’s a major problem with the guidelines. And it’s representative of a larger failing in our health care system.

“There are 17 subgroupings for children from birth through age 18. That makes sense because, of course, a 6-month-old has had little time to develop immunity, weighs far less than an 8-year-old and is exposed to fewer people than a teenager. There are five subgroups for adults. But all Americans 65 and older — including the two fastest-growing segments of our population, the 80- to 90-year-olds and those over 100 — are lumped in a single group, as if bodies and behaviors don’t change over the last half-century of life.

“You don’t need to be a doctor to see that this is absurd.”

Read this New York Times opinion column in its entirety, click here.

“Lititz woman shares her experience of coming to grips with early-onset Alzheimer’s” – Lancaster Online

mary r“Mary Read, who began a supportive social group for people who are in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease after she received her only early-onset diagnosis, poses with her dog, Princess, in the Lititz home she shares with her husband, George.”

“Mary Read had been a nurse for years, using her extensive training to care for patients in nursing homes and doctors’ offices.

“‘But all of a sudden I was forgetting stuff,’ she says. ‘I didn’t understand what the doctor wanted me to do — and it was stuff I’d been doing and suddenly couldn’t do.’

She had trouble calculating a patient’s height from inches to feet, for example, or she would forget how to spell the doctor’s name.

“It was stress, they thought. Maybe a virus attacking her brain.

“‘I was fired from my job,’ she says. ‘I knew something was wrong.’”

Click here to read this Lancaster Online article in its entirety.

 

 

“PBS Announces Broadcast Premiere for THE VIETNAM WAR” | begins September 17 – PBS

vietnam burns

“ARLINGTON, VA — THE VIETNAM WAR, a new 10-part, 18-hour documentary film series directed by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick, will premiere September 17, 2017, on PBS stations nationwide. The first five episodes will air nightly from Sunday, September 17, through Thursday, September 21, and the final five episodes will air nightly from Sunday, September 24, through Thursday, September 28. Each episode will premiere at 8:00 p.m. ET with a repeat broadcast immediately following the premiere (check local listings).

Beginning Tuesday, October 3, the series will re-air on a weekly basis through November 28, at 9:00 p.m. ET (check local listings).

On September 17, concurrent with the broadcast premiere, the first five episodes of THE VIETNAM WAR will be available for streaming on all station-branded PBS platforms, including PBS.org and PBS apps for iOS, Android, Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV and Chromecast, and the final five episodes will be available beginning September 24. All episodes will remain accessible until October 3, when the series begins its weekly rebroadcast. During the rebroadcast period, each episode will be available to stream for two weeks. PBS station members with Passport, a benefit for donors, offering extended access to a rich library of public television programming can view the entire series (all 10 episodes) beginning September 17 (contact your local PBS station for details).  The series will also be available in Spanish and Vietnamese on streaming.

A trailer for the film is available hereContinue reading →

“New Series of Maps: Disability in America”

“The Research and Training Center on Disability in Rural Communities (RTC: Rural) has produced a new series of maps from their research called “Disability in America”.

These maps are based on demographic data collected through the American Community Survey and cover a variety of topics including disability rates, rates of particular types of disabilities, and other indicators for people with disabilities such as poverty and employment.

disability mapsOne of the maps available here: http://rtc.ruralinstitute.umt.edu/research-findings/geography/maps/.

SOURCE: The National Association of States United for Aging and Disabilities (NASUAD) Friday Updates

 

Memories of Glenn Campbell in the Friday Wrap-Up, August 11, 2017 | a message from the Secretary of Aging

Each week week the Office of the Secretary of Pennsylvania’s Department of Aging releases a Friday newsletter with information relevant to activities, issues and events for older Pennsylvanians and persons with disabilities across the Commonwealth.

In this week’s newsletter, the Secretary remembers Glenn Campbell and points to a Website begun by Campbell’s wife, Kim: “www.CareLiving.org, a website and social movement designed to provide information, inspiration, encouragement, empowerment, and hope to caregivers to care for themselves while caring for others.”

Click here to download the newsletter as a .pdf file. 

 

 

“Bullying and suicide: What’s the connection?” – The Conversation

suicide 2For youth who identify as being bullied, the tendency to suicidality can be quite high.”

“Bullying, as many people know, can be a tremendously painful experience for a young person. The point has been driven home over the last decade by stories about teens like Phoebe Prince or Amanda Todd, who killed themselves after experiencing bullying.

“Recently, the parents of eight-year-old Gabriel Taye filed a federal lawsuit against the Cincinnati public schools, alleging that their son committed suicide because the school covered up and failed to prevent a culture of bullying.

“All 50 states have some kind of anti-bullying law, and schools are increasingly being called upon to implement bullying prevention programs.

“Bullying and suicide are both significant public health concerns for children and adolescents.”

Continue reading this article in its entirety at The Conversation.