“The Comforting Fictions of Dementia Care” – The New Yorker

“Many facilities are using nostalgic environments as a means of soothing the misery, panic, and rage their residents experience.”

fictions of dementia care“The memory-care unit in Ohio’s Chagrin Valley is designed to look like an American town from its residents’ childhoods.” – Photograph by Philip Montgomery for The New Yorker

by Larissa MacFarquhar

“The large central room of the memory-care unit was designed to look like an old-fashioned American town square. There was a small fountain, surrounded by plants and a low stone wall; there were a couple of lampposts, and benches, tables, and chairs set about. The carpet was mottled with darker and lighter shades of green, to resemble grass growing and bending in different directions. Along the walls were the façades of what looked like clapboard houses, with wooden shutters and shingled pitched roofs and porches that extended into the room. Two long hallways, which led off from opposite sides of the central room, looked like streets in the same town, with more clapboard façades and porches on either side. These façades were not altogether fake: each front door opened onto a suite of small rooms—living room, bedroom, bathroom—that was a resident’s home.

“Some of the porches had rocking chairs that you could sit in and watch people go by. Many of the residents were quite restless, and there was nowhere else to go, so people did walk by fairly often. Daylight came in through high windows just below the ceiling, and the ceiling itself consisted of bright light panels painted to look like a blue sky dotted with clouds. In the evening, as it began to grow dark outside, lights on the porches came on. Sometime later, the street lamps were lit; and finally, around eight o’clock, the ceiling sky was switched off, so that the unit came to look like a small-town street at night.

“The illusion was surprisingly effective.”

This is a long read; click here to continue reading this article at The New Yorker.

“As Homelessness Rate Rises For Elderly, Some Finding Shelter In Cars” – MarketPlace

Los Angeles Mayor Declares State Of Emergency Over Homelessness Problem In City“A homeless man for over 30 years, who lives inside his car, repairs a bicycle on Sept. 23, 2015 in Hollywood.”  – Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

“In some parts of the country, like Central Florida, senior citizens make up about 10 percent of the homeless population.”

“The population of sheltered homeless seniors, age 62 and older, in the  U.S. population rose from 2.9 percent to 4.7  percent from 2007 to 2016. That’s according to the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development. In some parts of the country, like Central Florida, senior citizens make up about 10 percent of the homeless population. And because there’s an affordable housing crunch, some homeless seniors are now living out of their cars.”

More here.

REPORT: “Travel Patterns of American Adults with Disabilities”

Transportation

This issue brief uses data from the 2017 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) to examine the daily travel patterns of American adults with travel-limiting disabilities. It also explores data from the 2001 and 2009 NHTS to illustrate trends over time. Key statistical highlights of this report include:

  • 25.5 million Americans age 5 and older have self-reported travel-limiting disabilities.
  • Only one-fifth of people age 18 to 64 with travel-limiting disabilities work full- or part-time
  • 7 out of 10 respondents with disabilities reduce their day-to-day travel because of their disabilities

Although several groups of technologies might help people with disability-related transportation limitations, people with disabilities tend to use these technologies less frequently.
Click here to read the full report and see more statistics on income, employment, and travel patterns.

“Can people be saved from a terrible childhood?” – The Guardian

“US researchers have found early intervention can help prevent negative experiences in infancy turning into long-term health risks”

terrible childhood Illustration: Nathalie Lees

by Lauren Zanolli in New Orleans

“When Sabrina Bugget-Kellum walked into a neighbourhood clinic in New York for a routine appointment in in 2016, she was desperateHer son was in prison. She was trying to look after his two young children, who were aged one and two. Their mother was emotionally unstable. Bugget-Kellum did not want the chaos of the adults’ lives passed down to another generation.

“‘We didn’t know if they would be safe with their mother,’ she recalled recently. ‘I began to pray, please God, I need some help. There were so many things going on.’

“While at the clinic, Bugget-Kellum learned about a new parenting programme designed for carers of young children who have faced early adversity such as domestic abuse, homelessness or the loss of a parent to incarceration. ‘It was like I had my ammunition and I knew how to fight,’ said Bugget-Kellum of the programme.”

At bottom there is a revolutionary idea. It’s about moving from ‘what’s wrong with you?’ to ‘what happened to you?’ – Leslie Lieberman

Click here to continue reading this article at The Guardian.

 

Friday Wrap-Up, November 9, 2018 | a message from the Secretary of Aging

Each week the Office of the Secretary of Pennsylvania’s Department of Aging releases a Friday newsletter with information relevant to activities, issues and events for older Pennsylvanians and persons with disabilities across the Commonwealth.

Also listed in the Friday Wrap-UP are upcoming events about Link partner events listed at the Service Area 13 Website.

Click here download the newsletter as a .pdf file.

 

New Palliative Care Guidelines Released

palliative care guidelined

“New clinical practice guidelines for palliative care have been released by the National Consensus Project, with support from John A. Hartford Association (JAHF) for the evidence review. They include tools, resources and examples to give patients and their caregivers relief from the symptoms and stress of serious illness, based on need, not prognosis. The guidelines urge all health care professionals and organizations to integrate palliative care into their services across settings.

“Palliative care is the best friend of the seriously ill,” said JAHF Senior Program Officer Amy Berman.”

Click here or on the graphic to download the guidelines.

Employment opportunity with the Lebanon County Area Agency on Aging

vol coord

 

“The Ways Inequality Affects Black Americans at the End of Life” – next avenue

“Contributing factors: health inequity, discrimination and lack of cultural competency”

Racial-Disparities-in-the-End-of-Life-CareCredit: Adobe Stock

by Rochaun Meadows-Fernandez

“Jodi Savage was her grandmother’s caretaker in her last days. Like many black Americans, her grandmother’s cultural beliefs and religious background led to very little discussion around the end of life. Culturally speaking, black Americans on the whole tend to avoid discussing end-of-life topics for fear of speaking things into existence. Focus is placed on making the best of the time you’re given. A lack of cultural competency from physicians led to a misunderstanding of Savage’s grandmother’s needs and minimal support through the death-planning process. Savage endured all of this while trying to remain strong as her grandmother battled Alzheimer’s.

“Savage wasn’t prepared for the process of making such impactful decisions on her grandmother’s behalf. No one assisted her with end-of-life planning during the process of caretaking, and she didn’t discuss end-of-life care until the night before her grandmother died.”

Continue reading this article at next avenue in its entirety.


Part of the LIVING TO THE END OF LIFE SPECIAL REPORT

(Editor’s note: This content is provided by The John A. Hartford Foundation, a Next Avenue sponsor.)

and the scams keep coming | phone scams and email scams

Here are just two of the email offers we received today:

kommando keyboard

“Hello, How are you doing? I hope your doing great? I am Capt. William Hall an officer in the U.S Army. I have a transaction that i believe will be of mutual benefit to both of us. I hope you can be trusted to handle some serious and confidential transactions? Please contact me asap for more details.”

 

“al ethics but please treat with absolute secrecy and personal. My name is Mr Naji Otri from Damascus Syria. i’m now a retired government officials I was the former prime minister of the Federal Republic of SYRIA and ex-agriculture minister,personal investor & financial consultant advisers to some Top Politician in Syria, I chairman a group of company Kabour brothers co (Hermanos) and Al Furat Petroleum Company (AFPC) the leader in the region in Reservoir Management AFPC was established under Service Contract no. 210 ratified by Law no. 43 of 1977 and named as per decree-law no.12 in
1985.

Am interested in buying properties houses, Building real estate as
means to secure stability to my money ,I will appreciate your idea and
knowledge regarding this or any other profitable investment you may
suggest, on my next email i will explain to you the full details of
this investment Proposal.

I shall tell you more about myself and my family on my next email,
upon your respond, you may as well tell me little more about yourself.
I’m waiting for your good responds.

Waiting for your reply and let me know if i can trust you the civil
war in my country has left me with no option and i may lose all my
money soon if nothing is done fast.contactme here pls.
najiotri1@gmail.com
Thanks
Mr.Naji Otri
Damascus,Syria

These folks keep slinging stuff against the wall hoping that some of it sticks. These are obvious scams. The spelling and the grammar are so bad; that should be tip-off number one.

Just delete emails like this; see what the Federal Bureau of Investigation has to say about email scams.

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