Category Archives: Caregiving

Go Go Grandparents could be a transportation resource assist for some

A person from Lebanon County sent this in an email. Though not available in every part of the Berks-Lancaster-Lebanon Service area, this service may be an answer for some persons with transportation challenges.

gogoClick on the graphic to download the brochure.

GoGoGrandparent turns on demand transportation companies like Lyft into services that help families take better care of older adults.

Step 1: CALL 1 (855) 464-6872 and wait to hear “thanks for calling GoGoGrandparent”

Step 2:

PRESS 1 for a car to your home

PRESS 2 for a car to where we dropped you off last

PRESS 3, 4 or 5 for a car to a custom pick up location

PRESS 0 to speak with an operator

https://gogograndparent.com/

Two reports on caring for persons living with dementia and their caregivers

supporting people

Click here to read this report.

proven programsClick here to read this AARP report.

What you should know and do this flu season if you are 65 years and older

From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): “It has been recognized for many years that people 65 years and older are at greater risk of serious complications from the flu compared with young, healthy adults because human immune defenses become weaker with age. While flu seasons can vary in severity, during most seasons, people 65 years and older bear the greatest burden of severe flu disease. In recent years, for example, it’s estimated that between 71 percent and 85 percent of seasonal flu-related deaths have occurred in people 65 years and older and between 54 percent and 70 percent of seasonal flu-related hospitalizations have occurred among people in that age group. So influenza is often quite serious for people 65 and older.”

flu graphic

“At Florida Nursing Home, Many Calls for Help, but None That Made a Difference” – The New York Times

FL nursing“Outside the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills, where eight residents died on Sept. 13 in the wake of Hurricane Irma. Credit Jason Henry for The New York Times”

“HOLLYWOOD, Fla. — The emergency room workers at Memorial Regional Hospital rushed the first patient to Room 9, which was devoted to the hope and practice of arresting death. They threaded fluid lines into her veins and readied a breathing tube. Even through gloves, they could feel the heat corseting the 84-year-old woman’s body.

“As they prepared to insert a catheter, they saw what looked like steam rising from her legs.

“The numbers from the catheter’s temperature gauge would not stop climbing. The nurses, respiratory technicians and other medical staff watched it halt at last at 41.9 degrees Celsius — 107 degrees Fahrenheit.

“It was only the fourth-highest body temperature Memorial would record that morning among elderly patients being evacuated from the nursing home nearby, the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills, where air-conditioning had failed after Hurricane Irma chewed up power lines across the state.

“Eight residents of the nursing home were dead by the end of that day, Sept. 13, and three who were among the 140 evacuated have died since.”

Click here to continue reading this New York Times article in its entirety.

Friday Wrap-Up, September 22, 2017 | a message from the Secretary of Aging

 

Each week week the Office of the Secretary of Pennsylvania’s Department of Aging releases a Friday newsletter with information relevant to activities, issues and events for older Pennsylvanians and persons with disabilities across the Commonwealth. Click here to download the newsletter as a .pdf file.

Improve the care you give and learn more about the people you serve by taking free video training courses. Click here to access free training videos at the Pennsylvania Home Care Association Website.

 

Friday Wrap-Up, September 15, 2017 | a message from the Secretary of Aging

“Because emergencies and disasters strike quickly, you might be forced to evacuate your neighborhood or be prepared to be confined to your home. What would you do if your basic services: water, gas, electricity, or communications, were cut off? Recognizing that state and regulating agencies have specific responsibilities to protect those entrusted to their facility’s care, it is incumbent upon each of us to learn how to take precautions to protect ourselves and cope with disaster by planning in advance and by working with those in our support network: family, neighbors, friends, and caregivers, as well as local responders, as a team.”

Each week week the Office of the Secretary of Pennsylvania’s Department of Aging releases a Friday newsletter with information relevant to activities, issues and events for older Pennsylvanians and persons with disabilities across the Commonwealth.Click here to download the newsletter as a .pdf file.

September is National Preparedness Month | Make a Plan for Yourself, Family and Friends

 

“From Research to Standard Practice: Advancing Proven Programs to Support Family Caregivers of Persons Living with Dementia”

“This report from the AARP Public Policy Institute discusses what is known about effective programs to support family caregivers and emphasizes evidence-based programs for family caregivers of persons living with dementia. Evidence-based programs to help caregiving families are not widely available in communities. This report looks at barriers to scaling up effective programs, such as health care and social services providers’ lack of knowledge about proven caregiver supportive services. Additionally, this report: draws attention to programs that have been shown to improve one or more aspects of the quality of life of family caregivers and can be implemented in local communities; summarizes positive program outcomes; and identifies common characteristics of successful caregiver programs and services. The report provides four recommendations to ensure a broader reach and wider impact for improving the lives of family caregivers and those for whom they care.” – NASUAD Friday Update

advancing proven programs

Click on the graphic above or here to download the report.

 

On National Grandparents Day 2017: Sept. 10, Grandparents still work to support grandchildren

grandparents work

In 1970, Marian McQuade initiated a campaign to establish a day to honor grandparents. In 1978, President Jimmy Carter signed a federal proclamation, declaring the first Sunday after Labor Day as National Grandparents Day. To honor our nation’s grandparents, the U.S. Census Bureau presents statistics about their role in American society as caregivers of their grandchildren.

Grandparents as Caregivers

7.3 million – The number of grandparents whose grandchildren under age 18 were living with them in 2015.

2.6 million – The number of grandparents responsible for the basic needs of one or more grandchild under age 18 living with them in 2015. Of these caregivers, 1.6 million were grandmothers and 1.0 million were grandfathers.

509,922 – The number of grandparents responsible for grandchildren under age 18 whose income was below the poverty level in the past 12 months, compared with the 2.1 million grandparent caregivers whose income was at or above the poverty level.

$51,448 – The median income for families with grandparent householders responsible for grandchildren under age 18. Among these families, where a parent of the grandchildren was not present, the median income was $37,580.

642,852 – The number of grandparents who had a disability and were responsible for their grandchildren.

September is National Preparedness Month | Make a Plan for Yourself, Family and Friends

National Preparedness Month 2017 Logo [JPG]Sponsored by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) within the Department of Homeland Security, National Preparedness Month encourages Americans to take steps to prepare for emergencies in their homes, businesses, schools, and communities.

In an email message from the US Department of Veterans Affairs Caregiver Support program, this reminder is especially relevant:

September is National Preparedness Month— a time to prepare yourself and those in your care for emergencies and disasters. Take a step toward preparedness. Create and maintain a comprehensive file of information about the person you are caring for. Whether you use an electronic format or a three-ring binder, keep the file where you can grab it quickly in an emergency or on your way out the door to an appointment.

Some items to include in a Patient File:

  • Care recipient’s medical history
  • Physician Contact Information
  • Allergies
  • Health history (e.g. surgeries, other medical conditions)
  • Medication List
  • Insurance Information (e.g., prescription, vision, dental, long-term care, etc.)
  • Legal Documents
  • Living Will
  • Durable power of attorney for Health Care (also known as a Health Care Proxy)
  • Power of Attorney for Finances
  • Contact information for care recipient’s lawyer
  •  Contact information for relatives and close friends

The Pennsylvania Link to Aging and Disability Resources Service Area 13 partners’ network likes this list a lot; in fact, the FEELING SAFE – BEING SAFE training workshop offered by the Berks-Lancaster-Lebanon Service Area partners’ networks includes the same information in the planning process.

FSBS usb

If you would like information about FEELING SAFE – BEING SAFE, contact the Berks-Lancaster-Lebanon Service Area coordinator. Call or text: 717.380.9714. Email: blllink@mail.com.

 

 

Administration for Community Living releases first ever National Data on Adult Maltreatments

Earlier this week, at the National Adult Protective Services Association conference, the Administration for Community Living (ACL) released the first consistently, systematically, and nationally collected data on the abuse of older adults and adults with disabilities.

This report is the first of a series based on data from the first year of the National Adult Maltreatment Reporting System (NAMRS). NAMRS is a voluntary data reporting system collecting data from state and local Adult Protective Services systems.

Fifty-four of 56 states and territories contributed data to NAMRS in its first year. This high level of voluntary participation reflects the value that leaders in the field of adult maltreatment see in this data.

While NAMRS is still in its infancy, the information it will provide in the years to come will directly inform prevention and intervention practices at all levels of the adult maltreatment field. It will provide a better understanding of the characteristics of those experiencing, and perpetrating, abuse and identify system gaps for responding to maltreatment and preventing repeat maltreatment. As states and territories will continue to improve information systems, add data elements, train staff on new data collection methods, and report additional data, NAMRS data will become an extremely valuable tool.

Data collected by NAMRS includes APS staff and case-load, response and response time, intake and investigation practices, maltreatment type, victim characteristics, and perpetrator characteristics. For example, 44 states and territories reported opening investigations for over 877,000 clients.

Many in the adult maltreatment field, including the federal Elder Justice Coordinating Council, have recognized the need for national data on adult maltreatment. After the passage and funding of the Elder Justice Act, ACL awarded the first-ever federal grants to enhance Adult Protective Services. These grants were used by many states to build data systems and align them with NAMRS.

View the first NAMRS report.