Category Archives: Employment

“What baby boomers can learn from millennials at work- and vice versa” – TEDTalk

Recall the 2015 movie, The Intern with Robert DeNiro?

AARP reports, “The job market is looking bright for older Americans who are looking for jobs.

“If you think older workers are sitting around twiddling their thumbs, hesitant to contact employers in a tightening labor market, you’d be wrong. In February, the unemployment rate for those 55 and older was 3.2 percent — nearly a full point lower than the overall 4.1 percent rate for the entire U.S. population and drastically lower than the 14.4 percent rate for teens.”

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“For the first time ever, we have five generations in the workplace at the same time, says entrepreneur Chip Conley. What would happen if we got intentional about how we all work together? In this accessible talk, Conley shows how age diversity makes companies stronger and calls for different generations to mentor each other at work, with wisdom flowing from old to young and young to old alike.” – Watch this energizing 12-minute TEDTalk.

“Poll: 1 in 4 don’t plan to retire despite realities of aging” – WorkingLongerStudy

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by Andrew Soergel

“CHICAGO (AP) — Nearly one-quarter of Americans say they never plan to retire, according to a poll that suggests a disconnection between individuals’ retirement plans and the realities of aging in the workforce.

“Experts say illness, injury, layoffs and caregiving responsibilities often force older workers to leave their jobs sooner than they’d like.

“According to the poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, 23% of workers, including nearly 2 in 10 of those over 50, don’t expect to stop working. Roughly another quarter of Americans say they will continue working beyond their 65th birthday.

“According to government data, about 1 in 5 people 65 and older was working or actively looking for a job in June.”

Click here to read this article in its entirety.


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Most Older Americans Face Age Discrimination in the Workplace, New Survey Finds: Forty-five percent say the growing trend toward delayed retirement is good for the economy.”


“Your Professional Decline Is Coming (Much) Sooner Than You Think: Here’s how to make the most of it.” – The Atlantic

“The data are shockingly clear that for most people, in most fields, professional decline starts earlier than almost anyone thinks.”

 

 

Luci Gutiérrez

by Arthur C. Brooks

“‘It’s not true that no one needs you anymore.’

“These words came from an elderly woman sitting behind me on a late-night flight from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C. The plane was dark and quiet. A man I assumed to be her husband murmured almost inaudibly in response, something to the effect of ‘I wish I was dead.’

“Again, the woman: ‘Oh, stop saying that.’

“I didn’t mean to eavesdrop, but couldn’t help it. I listened with morbid fascination, forming an image of the man in my head as they talked. I imagined someone who had worked hard all his life in relative obscurity, someone with unfulfilled dreams—perhaps of the degree he never attained, the career he never pursued, the company he never started.

“At the end of the flight, as the lights switched on, I finally got a look at the desolate man. I was shocked. I recognized him—he was, and still is, world-famous. Then in his mid‑80s, he was beloved as a hero for his courage, patriotism, and accomplishments many decades ago.”

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This a “long read” — but maybe just right for a Sunday (or any other) morning. Click here to read this article at The Atlantic.

 

Come to the OVR JOB FAIR on Wednesday, June 12 | PA’s Office of Vocational Rehabilitation job fair provides opportunity

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announcing a Military Intership Program

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“Do People With Disabilities Earn Equal Pay? | America Counts: Stories Behind the Numbers” – US Census Bureau

Overall, workers with a disability earn less than workers who do not have a disability. Yet, depending on the types of work they do, much of the difference in median earnings disappear.

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Today, a record 9 million people with a disability work. While these workers, age 16 and older, are spread throughout the labor force, workers with a disability tend to concentrate in certain jobs depending on their age and particular disability.

Among people working similar jobs and schedules, the median earnings for workers with a disability are either very close to, or not different from, earnings for workers with no disability.

The most common occupation for people with a disability is janitors and building cleaners, where about 300,000 workers with disabilities find employment. They make up 11 percent of workers in this occupation.

Other large occupations for workers with disabilities are:

  • Drivers/sales workers/truck drivers.
  • Cashiers.
  • Retail salespersons.
  • Laborers and freight, stock and material movers.

Continue reading this US Census Bureau article, click here.

Tips for finding fulfilling employment when you have a disability

tipsPhoto via Unsplash

by Jenny Wise

Having a disability shouldn’t prevent you from going after your career goals. While your job search will likely look very similar to that of someone without disabilities, you may face a few unique challenges along the way. Here are some tips to help you hit the ground running with your job hunt and land a position where you can let your skills shine.

Focus on What You Do Best

Anyone looking for a job should focus on their strengths above all else. Of course, it’s important to keep in mind the kinds of things you need in an ideal work environment and narrow your search to jobs where your disability will not limit you in any way. But it’s also crucial to think about the things you can do best! Avoid fixating on your limitations. Make a list of your greatest strengths to help you decide on a career field where you will thrive.

When you eventually go for an interview, use these strengths as your jumping off point. Talk about all of the things you can do well. Consider coming up with a short, but powerful, elevator pitch that reflects the unique ways you can benefit the company. Think about what drives you, why you are motivated to try your best every day, what aspects of the job you’re passionate about, and why you would be the perfect fit for the job. This really shows hiring managers that you’re driven to succeed.

Be Confident

Hiring managers love to see that a potential employee is confident in their abilities. You can display this confidence by addressing your disability in your interview and demonstrating how it does not affect your ability to do great things. If you feel uncomfortable disclosing your disability, that’s okay too! You don’t have to tell your interviewer anything you don’t want to. However, many people feel their confidence soar when they use their disability to show how they’ve overcome challenges or dealt with judgment in a constructive way.

Asking questions is another great way to show interviewers that you’re extremely driven. Do your research on the company and come prepared with a few questions about the organization. This really shows that you know what you’re talking about. You can also ask questions about development opportunities, professional responsibilities, and what success in the position would look like.

Craft a Skills-Based Resume

If you haven’t been employed for a while or you’ve switched jobs a lot in the past, a skills-based resume is your best bet. Instead of listing work history and education in chronological order, a skills-focused resume displays the targeted skills that make you uniquely qualified for the job. Adjust your resume for each job you apply for, listing a different combination of skills tailored to each position. Check out this article from Career Sidekick for help tailoring your resume to a specific job.

On your resume and in your interview, try to show your skills rather than simply telling about them. Avoid using clichés such as “hard-working” or “strong attention to detail.” Instead, use facts, numbers, and results to display your accomplishments.

Know Your Rights

As you go through the job-hunting process, make sure you have a solid understanding of your rights as a person with a disability. There are several federal laws that protect you from discrimination both during the job application process and in the workplace. For example, employers cannot reject you just because you cannot perform tasks that are not essential to the job position. Your employer must also make reasonable accommodations to help you do your job, like adjusting work schedules or modifying equipment. You can learn more about the Americans with Disabilities Act on FindLaw.

Companies today are realizing the valuable talents and skills that people with disabilities bring to their businesses. While it may have been extremely challenging to find work in the past, the future of employment for people with disabilities looks promising. More and more companies are providing accommodations, advancement opportunities, and accessible tools for people with disabilities, allowing them to thrive in jobs they enjoy.

“After I broke my neck, I couldn’t walk. But I could still lead.” – OZY

“Because the most talented person in the room might have a disability.”

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“While on vacation, I broke my neck bodysurfing. I was 25 years old and until then considered myself the best thing since sliced bread. But that life-altering accident changed the focus on everything. I was convinced I was done, that my career was over.

“But IBM thought differently. I had already been working for them, and they assured me they wanted me back after my 18-month recovery. I took up a job in technical publications and, 39 years later, in 2015, I retired as corporate director of marketing communications. At IBM, I met many people who had a lot of heart. When someone offered me a helping hand, I took it in the spirit in which it was given. But I worked my behind off. I wanted to prove something to myself: that I could be an equal or at least competitive.”

Continue reading this article at OZY.com, click here.

Employment opportunity with the Lebanon County Area Agency on Aging

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Job Announcement for Compeer Executive Director

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Compeer of Lebanon County, a 501c3 non-profit agency serving residents of Lebanon County who live with mental illness, is searching for a passionate, energetic, organized and articulate person for the position of Executive Director. Compeer has been dedicated to changing lives and making a positive impact to the Lebanon community by supporting individuals on their path to mental wellness since 1999.  Benefits include paid sick leave and a liberal personal leave policy.

Interested applicants should have the following solid skills:

  • Passion for working with those living with mental illnesses
  • Recruitment of volunteers to carry out the agency’s mission
  • Organization for all facets of the direction of the agency
  • Energy and charisma used for alerting community stakeholders to our mission
  • Excellent verbal and written expression skills
  • Education and experience in working in human services fields
  • Ability to serve as an emphatic advocate for the mission of Compeer, and for the greater advancement of mental health awareness and wellness within our communities
  • Ability to educate those who want to know more about our mission and the challenges for those living with mental illness
  • Ability to offer support to those seeking assistance with mental illness related challenges; and support to agency volunteers and clients
  • Flexibility to meet the needs of the agency and its mission beyond the normal workday
  • The highest ethical standards
  • Skills and foresight used when administering fiscal resources of the agency
  • Strong time management skills
  • Self-motivated and able to work independently with limited supervision
  • Ability to lift at least 25 pounds
  • Possession of a valid driver’s license
  • Ability to work evenings and weekends as needed

Main duties include, but are not limited to:

  • Work in collaboration with Compeer’s Board of Directors
  • Partner with local community groups (United Way, MH/ID/EI, etc.)
  • Grant writing
  • Administration of the agency’s finances
  • Recruitment, training, and on-going support of the volunteers of Compeer and CORPS
  • Support of Compeer’s clients
  • Supervision of additional agency staff
  • Community outreach and mental health advocacy

Education and experience:

  • Bachelor’s degree in human services or related field
  • Prior experience (3-5 years) working in non-profit agency and/or in mental health field
  • Bilingual a plus

Please email your resume, including references, along with a letter of interest to:  director@compeer-lebanon.org by 10/31/18.  Compeer is an equal opportunity employer.