Category Archives: Aging

“3 tips for preventing heat stroke” – The Conversation

Heat stroke is when a person’s core body temperature rises too high – often more than 104 F (40 C) – because high environmental temperatures and humidity prevent the body from cooling itself through sweating and breathing.”

heat and seniors

by Gabriel Neal

“As a primary care physician who often treats patients with heat-related illnesses, I know all too well how heat waves create spikes in hospitalizations and deaths related to ‘severe nonexertional hyperthermia,’ or what most people call ‘heat stroke.’

“Heat stroke is when a person’s core body temperature rises too high – often more than 104 F (40 C) – because high environmental temperatures and humidity prevent the body from cooling itself through sweating and breathing. As heat stroke develops, a patient experiences rapid heart rate, ragged breathing, dizziness, nausea, muscle cramps and confusion. Eventually the patient may lose consciousness entirely.

“Without medical intervention, heat stroke is often fatal. On average, about 658 Americans die each year from heat stroke, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“Victims of heat stroke can be any age, but most often it strikes the elderly –” 

Continue reading this article at The Conversationclick here

New name for APPRISE: Pennsylvania Medicare Education and Decision Insight, PA (MEDI)

new apprise name

Effective July 1, 2021, APPRISE is now Pennsylvania Medicare Education and Decision Insight, PA MEDI – Same Program, Same Services for Pennsylvania’s Medicare Beneficiaries, now with a New Name.

Pennsylvania Medicare Education  and Decision Insight (PA MEDI) offers free Medicare counseling to older Pennsylvanians. PA MEDI Counselors are specially trained to answer your questions and provide you with objective, easy-to-understand information about Medicare, Medicare Supplemental Insurance, Medicaid, and Long-Term Care Insurance. 

PA MEDI Counselors do not sell Medicare products but rather offer current, non-biased Medicare education to help you make the most informed choice about the Medicare options available to you.

Read more about the name change here.

“Calming Computer Jitters: Help for Seniors Who Aren’t Tech-Savvy” – Kaiser Health Network

computer

by Judith Graham

“Six months ago, Cindy Sanders, 68, bought a computer so she could learn how to email and have Zoom chats with her great-grandchildren.

“It’s still sitting in a box, unopened.

“’I didn’t know how to set it up or how to get help,’ said Sanders, who lives in Philadelphia and has been extremely careful during the coronavirus pandemic.

“Like Sanders, millions of older adults are newly motivated to get online and participate in digital offerings after being shut inside, hoping to avoid the virus, for more than a year. But many need assistance and aren’t sure where to get it.

“A recent survey from AARP, conducted in September and October, highlights the quandary. It found that older adults boosted technology purchases during the pandemic but more than half (54%) said they needed a better grasp of the devices they’d acquired. Nearly 4 in 10 people (37%) admitted they weren’t confident about using these technologies.”

Continue reading this article at KHN, click here.


Generations on Line’s Katie Burke has presented at Link Service Area 13 cross-training meetings in each of the Service Area’s counties; she’s also facilitated a Link Webinar earlier this year.


Click here to visit the Generations on Line Website for much more about its services.


 

“Aging While Black: The Crisis Among Black Americans as They Grow Old” – The Crisis

aging black

by Rodney A. Brooks

“After a lifetime of racial and health inequities, Black seniors are at risk of spending their last years with declining health, little income and virtually no savings.

“Numerous studies have noted that Black Americans have worse health than their white counterparts, including chronic diseases and disabilities leading to shorter and sicker lives than white Americans. A recent 2016 CIGNA Health Disparities report found:

  • Four in 10 Black men aged 20 or older have high blood pressure, a rate 30 percent higher than that of white men. Black men’s risk of a stroke is twice that of white men. For Black women, 45 percent of those aged 20 and older have high blood pressure, a rate 60 percent higher than white women.
  • Black women are 40 percent more likely to die of breast cancer than white women.
  • Black men have a 40 percent higher cancer death rate than white men.
  • Black Americans are 80 percent more likely to be diagnosed with diabetes than whites, and nearly twice as likely to be hospitalized.
  • Blacks are more than twice as likely as whites to suffer from Alzheimer’s and other kinds of dementia.

“Black women, said Tyson Brown, associate professor of sociology at Duke University, suffer from some of the highest levels of diabetes, hypertension, and other disabilities. Their health problems limit their ability to continue working. But many Black women have to continue working because of declining income as they age.

“’And so, it’s sort of a Catch-22,’ said Brown. ‘They’re often sort of put in a bind there.’”

Continue reading this article at The Crisis, click here.

“Know the signs of elder abuse and how to get help” – National Institute on Aging

The mistreatment of older adults can be by family members, strangers, health care providers, caregivers, or friends. Abuse can happen to any older adult, but often affects those who depend on others for help with activities of everyday life. Learn how to recognize some of the signs of elder abuse so you can step in and help. For example, you may notice that the older adult:

  • Seems depressed, confused, or withdrawn
  • Appears dirty, underfed, or dehydrated
  • Has unexplained bruises, burns, cuts, or scars
  • Has unpaid bills or recent changes in banking or spending patterns 

elder abuse spotting the signs

 

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“Opinion piece: Lessons from a Job Search” – Age Equity Alliance

older worker

“Author Dan Saffer provides some well-needed advice for job-hunters entering the fray. From the ageist attitudes in the tech industry to the importance of a well-maintained portfolio, Saffer encourages all to keep their heads high when the search can feel stressful.”

agesim

by Dan Saffer

“Note: I didn’t really want to write this article, but am doing so at others’ urging hoping it’ll give other job hunters some hope, some insights, or at least a laugh.

“There’s an idea held by many that the more experienced you are, the more accomplished you are, the better your network, the easier it is to find a job. I’m here to debunk this. I have 20+ years of experience, 10+ years in design management, a master’s degree in design from a great school, a seemingly good reputation, and my last role was at a high-profile company. Still, I was ghosted, given take-home design exercises, was told job offers were coming that never materialized, given ‘personality quizzes’ that I apparently didn’t pass, and suffered the same sorts of indignities during my exhaustive search for a new role.

“For about eight months, I hunted for a job. Unlike the last time I was out of work, I had no trouble landing interviews.” 

Read this opinion column in its entirety, click here.

“Caring for an Aging Nation” – KHN

“The number of Americans 65 and older is expected to nearly double in the next 40 years. Finding a way to provide and pay for the long-term health services they need won’t be easy.”

aging nation(LYDIA ZURAW / KHN)

by Lydia Zuraw and Carmen Heredia Rodriguez

“Health care for the nation’s seniors looms large as the baby-boom generation ages into retirement. President Joe Biden tacitly acknowledged those needs in March with his proposal to spend $400 billion over the next eight years to improve access to in-home and community-based care.

“The swelling population of seniors will far outpace growth in other age groups. That acceleration — and the slower growth in other age groups — could leave many older Americans with less family to rely on for help in their later years. Meanwhile, federal officials estimate that more than half of people turning 65 will need long-term care services at some point. That care is expensive and can be hard to find.”

disability 56

Click here to see the Kaiser Health Network data visualizations in full.

“What Robots Can—and Can’t—Do for the Old and Lonely” – The New Yorker

“For elderly Americans, social isolation is especially perilous. Will machine companions fill the void?”

animatronics

by Katie Engelhart

“It felt good to love again, in that big empty house. Virginia Kellner got the cat last November, around her ninety-second birthday, and now it’s always nearby. It keeps her company as she moves, bent over her walker, from the couch to the bathroom and back again. The walker has a pair of orange scissors hanging from the handlebar, for opening mail. Virginia likes the pet’s green eyes. She likes that it’s there in the morning, when she wakes up. Sometimes, on days when she feels sad, she sits in her soft armchair and rests the cat on her soft stomach and just lets it do its thing. Nuzzle. Stretch. Vibrate. Virginia knows that the cat is programmed to move this way; there is a motor somewhere, controlling things. Still, she can almost forget. ‘It makes you feel like it’s real,’ Virginia told me, the first time we spoke. ‘I mean, mentally, I know it’s not. But—oh, it meowed again!’

“‘She named the cat Jennie, for one of the nice ladies who work at the local Department of the Aging in Cattaraugus County, a rural area in upstate New York, bordering Pennsylvania.”

Click here to read this New Yorker article in its entirety.

“Tips for Older Adults to Regain Their Game After Being Cooped Up for More Than a Year” – Kaiser Health Network

activity after covid

Jane Collins “loves getting outside and that has been wonderful,” says daughter Laura. “Her mood immediately shifts when she gets out of the building.” (Laura Collins)

by Judith Graham

“Alice Herb, 88, an intrepid New Yorker, is used to walking miles around Manhattan. But after this year of being shut inside, trying to avoid covid-19, she’s noticed a big difference in how she feels.

“’Physically, I’m out of shape,’ she told me. ‘The other day I took the subway for the first time, and I was out of breath climbing two flights of stairs to the street. That’s just not me.’

“Emotionally, Herb, a retired lawyer and journalist, is unusually hesitant about resuming activities even though she’s fully vaccinated. ‘You wonder: What if something happens? Maybe I shouldn’t be doing that. Maybe that’s dangerous,’  she said.

“Millions of older Americans are similarly struggling with physical, emotional and cognitive challenges following a year of being cooped up inside, stopping usual activities and seeing few, if any, people.

“If they don’t address issues that have arisen during the pandemic — muscle weakness, poor nutrition, disrupted sleep, anxiety, social isolation and more — these older adults face the prospect of poorer health and increased frailty, experts warn.”

Continue reading this article at Kaiser Health Network, click here.

Column: “A Birthday Milestone: Turning 80!” – The New York Times

“The secret to a happy and vibrant old age? Strive to do what you love for as long as you can do it.”

turning 80

Gracia Lam

by Jane E. Brody

“When a 50ish woman at my Y learned that I was about to turn 80, she exclaimed, “80 is the new 60, and you set a great example for the rest of us!”

“At least, I’m in good company:

  • Dr. Anthony Fauci, national infectious disease guru, is five months my senior, sharp as a tack even under withering political fire;
  • Nancy Pelosi, 81-year-old Speaker of the House, also stands up well against fierce opposition;
  • Anthony Hopkins, 83, Oscar winner for “The Silence of the Lambs” and a frequent nominee, won again this year for “The Father”;
  • Morgan Freeman, also 83, acts with a voice of distinction bested only by his formidable talent. He has four upcoming movies and a TV series.
  • Bernie Sanders, former presidential hopeful who will be 80 in September, remains a force to be reckoned with in the U.S. Senate;
  • Paul Simon, a month younger than Mr. Sanders, has won 12 Grammys as a singer and songwriter in a now six-decade career. He recently sold his songwriting catalog to Sony for around $250 million.)

“The list goes on.”

Click here to continue reading this column at The New York Times.