Category Archives: Aging

“The United States of Elder Fraud – How Prevalent is Elder Financial Abuse in Each State?” – comparitech

USA-elder-fraud

by Paul Bischoff

“The vast majority of elder fraud cases in the US go unreported. Our research team set out to uncover the true cost of elder fraud in the US by analyzing and extrapolating data from government reports and registries.

“Comparitech estimates 5 million cases of elder fraud occur in the US annually resulting in $27.4 billion in losses.

“Elder fraud, also called elder financial abuse or elder financial exploitation, is defined as the misappropriation or abuse of financial control in a relationship where there is an expectation of trust, resulting in harm to the elderly victim.

“More than 200,000 scams and financial abuse cases targeting the elderly are reported to authorities every year, and most experts agree that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Our estimates show $1.17 billion in damages are reported to authorities, but the real figure likely dwarfs that amount when factoring in unreported elder fraud.

“To calculate the full scope of the problem, Comparitech aggregated data from multiple studies on elder fraud in every US state, including the number of reports to authorities and average loss per case. We then used those numbers to estimate the total number of cases and total damages in each state, adjusted for the proportion of unreported cases.”

Click here to read the report and read this article at comparitech in its entirety here.

“woman’s story personifies failures in Medicaid waiver program” – A long read about “system failures” at the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

trib review article“Fran Morgante moves her mom, Vilma Morgante, 100, to spend some time in the front room, Thursday, June 20, 2019, at the family’s Lower Burrell home. Fran Morgante, a professional musician lives in New York State and has moved back home to care for her mother.” – SOURCE: Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

by Deb Erdley

“Fran Morgante brushed back her mother’s hair tenderly as she offered the tiny elderly woman a drink of water on a hot June day.

“Vilma Morgante, who celebrated her 100th birthday June 21 in her Lower Burrell home, never asked much of the world.

“Her one desire: to die in the neat brick bungalow she and her late husband, Steve, scrimped and saved for and then built from the ground up seven decades ago.

“Frail, suffering from moderate dementia for the previous year and a half and forced to use a wheelchair, she relied on her daughter — a professional violinist with the Buffalo Philharmonic — to steer her through the complex web of rules and regulations that govern the safety net designed to protect the nation’s most vulnerable citizens.

“‘Years ago, I tried to talk her into coming to live with me, and she said, “Chica, I want to die at home,” Fran Morgante recalled.

“On July 4, Vilma died at home, one year and two days after qualifying for 24-hour home care — care that never arrived.”

Click here to read this Pittsburgh Tribune-Review article in its entirety.

“Poll: 1 in 4 don’t plan to retire despite realities of aging” – WorkingLongerStudy

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by Andrew Soergel

“CHICAGO (AP) — Nearly one-quarter of Americans say they never plan to retire, according to a poll that suggests a disconnection between individuals’ retirement plans and the realities of aging in the workforce.

“Experts say illness, injury, layoffs and caregiving responsibilities often force older workers to leave their jobs sooner than they’d like.

“According to the poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, 23% of workers, including nearly 2 in 10 of those over 50, don’t expect to stop working. Roughly another quarter of Americans say they will continue working beyond their 65th birthday.

“According to government data, about 1 in 5 people 65 and older was working or actively looking for a job in June.”

Click here to read this article in its entirety.


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Most Older Americans Face Age Discrimination in the Workplace, New Survey Finds: Forty-five percent say the growing trend toward delayed retirement is good for the economy.”


“Understanding Drug Side Effects as You Age | As your metabolism changes, common meds may trigger new, unwelcome reactions” – AARP

by Kathleen Fifield

While you’ve probably given your metabolism some thought when it comes to midlife weight gain, your digestive process affects other things, too — including how your body handles any drugs you take.

Black man examining prescription bottle in medicine cabinet

“‘Your metabolism changes a lot as part of the normal aging process,’ explains internist Michael Hochman, clinical associate professor of medicine and director of the University of Southern California Gehr Family Center for Health Systems Science. ‘Your liver breaks things down differently, your kidneys stop being as efficient, and your GI system works a little more slowly. That means a medication that your body may have had no trouble metabolizing when you were middle-aged becomes more problematic as you get older.’ As a result, you’ll be more susceptible to possible side effects from the medications you take than someone a decade or two younger, he says.

“Overall, 1 in 6 adults over age 65 are likely to have a harmful reaction to one or more of the meds they’re popping, according to the American Geriatric Society.”

C;lick here to read this article at AARP in its entirety.


Read this related information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Adverse Drug Events in Adults

“The need is great and growing for accessible, affordable housing” | maybe this is one step toward satisfying that need?

malls to residencesShuttered stores dominate the interior of the Schuylkill Mall which has closed and been demolished in Frackville, Pennsylvania.

This article at Pennlive today, “Dead and dying malls of Pennsylvania, updated: More shopping centers are bleeding retailers.” prompted a revisited look at an idea that’s being floated across the nation.

What will become of these once-popular retail centers? Demolish them? Re-store them? Re-purpose them?

“The retail apocalypse has not been kind to malls. Credit Suisse recently studied the state of mall-based retail and predicted that that about one-fourth of the nation’s 1,100 shopping malls — or roughly 220 to 275 shopping centers — will close by 2022.”

The  above is the lead paragraph from this Forbes Magazine article: “Why Malls Should Add Residential To Their Repurposing Plans.”

Te idea that malls offer ideal solutions for affordable, accessible residences is one that has to be considered. Many malls already are on public transportation routes; they already have plenty of parking and they’re “walkable.”

This white paper by New York State Assemblyman Stephen Englebright points out other benefits for older adults and people with disabilities:

  • Mixed-use development that includes housing, shopping, amenities, and
    access to transportation and professional offices provides easy, often
    walkable, access to necessities for daily living and substantially reduces or eliminates use of personal cars—thereby, (1) helping non-driving older people and people with disabilities to remain independent for much longer periods of time, (2) keeping these individuals integrated with others in the community, and (3)  significantly supporting the caregiving efforts of family members.
  • Subsidized housing in place of distressed or vacant strip malls, or developed above prosperous malls, helps address the State’s significant need for additional affordable housing, thereby helping to keep seniors and people with disabilities living in their own communities instead of relocating.
  • Small numbers of affordable units above a box store or strip mall, or incorporated as a component of a mixed-income larger redevelopment of a shopping center furthers the integration of low- and moderate-income families and individuals into the wider community.

Another Forbes Magazine shares the thought: “4 Models Of The Shopping Mall Of The Future.”

In Providence, RI, “You Can Now Live Inside America’s First Shopping Mall for $550 a Month: But there’s already a waiting list for these new micro apartments.”

Explore the 2018 Profile of Older Americans

Based on data from the U.S. Census Bureau, the profile illustrates the shifting demographics of Americans age 65 and older on key topic areas such as income, living arrangements, education, health, and caregiving. 

2018 oilder profile

Click on the graphic to view the entire report.

“How 65 came to be defined as a turning point into old age” – MarketPlace

“When I get older losing my hair
Many years from now
Will you still be sending me a valentine
Birthday greetings, bottle of wine?
If I’d been out till quarter to three
Would you lock the door?
Will you still need me, will you still feed me
When I’m sixty-four?”

Read more: The Beatles – When I’m Sixty-four Lyrics | MetroLyrics 

when im 65“Many of the regulars at The Allegheny Elks Lodge in Pittsburgh had a love/hate relationship with their 65th birthdays.” – Erika Beras/Marketplace

by Erika Beras

“For a lot of people, turning 65 is a kind of love-hate experience. At the Allegheny Elks Lodge in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the people who’ve seen their 65th birthdays come and go refer to themselves as ‘geezers.’

“Like Joe Campisi, 69, who’s a retired police officer. He says that at 30 years of age, 65 seemed a lifetime away. At 60: ’65 seemed a long ways away. Now I’m going to be 70 … and I blew right through 65.’

“For Linda Nehrer, who turned 65 nine years ago, the 65th birthday came and went. She continued working as a school administrator, spending time with her friends and singing with bands. Still, she says, when she thinks of her age: “Some days I don’t like it as much as other days.”

“Then there’s JoAnn Azinger, 74.”

Click here to read (or listen to)  this article in its entirety at MarketPlace.

“Supports to help older people age in place” – National Institute on Aging

caregivers

Many older adults want to grow old at home. As a caregiver, you can help by arranging supports for the person (and for yourself)!

  • Personal care. Is bathing, washing hair, or dressing getting harder to do? As a caregiver, you can help. Or you could hire a trained aide for a short time each day.
  • Household chores. Does the person need help with chores like house cleaning, yard work, grocery shopping, or laundry? Some grocery stores and drugstores will take an order over the phone or online and bring the items to the person’s home. There are cleaning and yard services you can hire, or maybe someone you know has a housekeeper or gardener to suggest. Some housekeepers will help with laundry. Some dry cleaners will pick up and deliver your clothes.
  • Meals. Worried about your loved one not eating nutritious meals or being tired of eating alone? Encourage eating with others. Find out if meals are served at a nearby senior center or house of worship. Meal delivery programs bring hot meals into your home; some of these programs are free or low-cost.
  • Money management. Many caregivers lend a hand in bill paying and money management. Volunteers, financial counselors, or geriatric care managers can also help. Just make sure you get the referral from a trustworthy source, like your local Area Agency on Aging. Learn more about legal and financial planning for older adults.
  • Health care. You can help an older person set out medications for a week at a time using pill boxes. Ask the person if they would like company at medical appointments so you can take notes on what the doctor or nurse says. If the person is hospitalized and needs nursing care at home for a short time, make sure to talk with the hospital discharge planner to get help making arrangements.

Visit our website to learn more about aging in place

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“A Clearer Map For Aging: ‘Elderhood’ Shows How Geriatricians Help Seniors Thrive” – NPR

Yesterday afternoon, Dr. Louise Aronson was featured on WITF radio; her interview (only 37 minutes long) is quite interesting. Click here to listen.

elderhood“Geriatrics is a specialty that should adapt and change with each patient, says physician and author Louise Aronson. ‘I need to be a different sort of doctor for people at different ages and phases of old age.’” – Robert Lang Photography/Getty Images

“Dr. Louise Aronson says the U.S. doesn’t have nearly enough geriatricians — physicians devoted to the health and care of older people: ‘There may be maybe six or seven thousand geriatricians,’ she says. ‘Compare that to the membership of the pediatric society, which is about 70,000.’

“Aronson is a geriatrician and a professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. She notes that older adults make up a much larger percentage of hospital stays than their pediatric counterparts. The result, she says, is that many geriatricians wind up focusing on “the oldest and the frailest” — rather than concentrating on healthy aging.

“Aronson sees geriatrics as a specialty that should adapt and change with each patient. ‘My youngest patient has been 60 and my oldest 111, so we’re really talking a half-century there,’ she says. ‘I need to be a different sort of doctor for people at different ages and phases of old age.’

“She writes about changing approaches to elder health care and end-of-life care in her new book, Elderhood: Redefining Aging, Transforming Medicine, Reimagining Life.”

elderhood book

 

“The Elderly Are Getting Complex Surgeries. Often It Doesn’t End Well.” – The New York Times

“Complication rates are high among the oldest patients. Now a surgeons’ group will propose standards for hospitals operating on the elderly.”

senior surgeryCredit: Stuart Briers

By Paula Spahn

“People over 65 represent roughly 16 percent of the American population, but account for 40 percent of patients undergoing surgery in hospitals — and probably more than half of all surgical procedures.

“Those proportions are likely to increase as the population ages and more seniors consider surgery, including procedures once deemed too dangerous for them.

“Dr. Clifford Ko, a colorectal surgeon at the University of California, Los Angeles, recently performed major surgery on an 86-year-old with rectal cancer, for instance.

“‘Ten years ago, I’d think, “My god, can this person even survive the operating room?”’” Dr. Ko said. ‘Now, it’s increasingly common to see octogenarians for these types of operations.’

Read this New York Times article in its entirety here.