Category Archives: Aging

Aging … new thoughts and updated data

old yet

“New measures of population aging are useful because tomorrow’s older people will not be like today’s. They may well have longer life expectancies, better cognition, better education, and fewer severe disabilities . In most OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) countries, the labor force participation of people 65+ years old is increasing  as are the ages at which people can receive a normal national pension . Since changes in the characteristics of people are ignored in the conventional measures of aging,

In an article at Futurity.org, a study suggests “Aging should be based on the number of years people are likely to live in a given country in the 21st century, say researchers. By that logic, 70 may be the new 60.

Click here to read the article: “Are you ‘old’ yet? The cut-off has shifted.”

aging america

In a news release from the United States Census Bureau, “The Nation’s Older Population Is Still Growing, Census Bureau Reports” that “The nation’s population has a distinctly older age profile than it did 16 years ago, according to new U.S. Census Bureau population estimates released today.

“New detailed estimates show the nation’s median age — the age where half of the population is younger and the other half older — rose from 35.3 years on April 1, 2000, to 37.9 years on July 1, 2016.

“‘The baby-boom generation is largely responsible for this trend,’ said Peter Borsella, a demographer in the Population Division. ‘Baby boomers began turning 65 in 2011 and will continue to do so for many years to come.’

“Residents age 65 and over grew from 35.0 million in 2000, to 49.2 million in 2016, accounting for 12.4 percent and 15.2 percent of the total population, respectively.”

Click here to continue reading this United States Census Bureau news release.

Major Senior, Health Advocates Endorse Governor Wolf’s Unified Department of Health and Human Services

Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf announced today that a broad coalition of advocates for seniors, recovery, people with disabilities, and other health and human services populations is speaking out in support of the unification of the departments of Health, Human Services, Aging, and Drug and Alcohol Programs into one Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

“Having the support of this broad coalition of senior and human services advocates strengthens my administration’s efforts to break down silos, increase government efficiency, and listen across party lines and ideologies to develop a practical solution of integrating these vital human services agencies into one unified Department of Health and Human Services,” Governor Wolf said. “I applaud these organizations for sharing their ideas as we move through this process and for their support as we make the new department a reality for the people of Pennsylvania.”

These groups include: Rehabilitation & Community Providers Association (RCPA), The Arc of Pennsylvania, The Alliance of PA Councils, PA Health Access Network (PHAN), Pennsylvania Association of Area Agencies on Aging (P4A), Pennsylvania Homecare Association, County Commissioners Association of Pennsylvania (CCAP), Mental Health Association in Pennsylvania,  Equality Pennsylvania, Commonwealth Foundation, Alzheimer’s Association – Greater PA Chapter, Alzheimer’s Association – Delaware Valley Chapter, Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center, and Pennsylvania Advocacy and Resources for Autism and Intellectual Disability (PAR).

Governor Wolf has worked closely with the four departments and myriad advocates to identify and break down silos and reimagine how the state delivers such critical services. A website — https://www.governor.pa.gov/health-and-human-services/ was launched … Continue reading this news release in its entirety; click here.

New Innovations in Nutrition Programs and Services Grant Opportunity to Promote the Quality and Effectiveness of Nutrition Service Programs

The Administration on Aging (AoA), part of the Administration for Community Living (ACL), announces a new grant opportunity to increase the evidenced based knowledge base of nutrition providers, drive improved health outcomes for program recipients by promoting higher service quality, and increase program efficiency through innovative nutrition service delivery models.

This funding opportunity is to support innovative and promising practices that move the aging network towards evidenced based practices that enhance the quality, effectiveness of nutrition services programs or outcomes within the aging services network. Innovation can include service products that appeal to caregivers (such as web-based ordering systems and carryout food products), increased involvement of volunteers (such as retired chefs), consideration of eating habits and choice (such as variable meal times, salad bars, or more fresh fruits and vegetables), new service models (testing variations and hybrid strategies) and other innovations to better serve a generation of consumers whose needs and preferences are different.

Please visit the link here for more details about the grant opportunity and application process. This grant opportunity closes on August 7, 2017.

“‘How Long Have I Got, Doc?’ Why Many Cancer Patients Don’t Have Answers” – California Healthline

cancer-decisions-4Bruce Mead-e, 63, who has advanced lung cancer, stands in the garden at his home in Georgetown, Del. Over four years, he has undergone two major surgeries, multiple rounds of radiation and chemotherapy. (Eileen Blass for Kaiser Health News)

by Liz Szabo

“In the past four years, Bruce Mead-e has undergone two major surgeries, multiple rounds of radiation and chemotherapy to treat his lung cancer.

“Yet in all that time, doctors never told him or his husband whether the cancer was curable — or likely to take Mead-e’s life.

“‘We haven’t asked about cure or how much time I have,’ said Mead-e, 63, of Georgetown, Del., in a May interview. ‘We haven’t asked, and he hasn’t offered. I guess we have our heads in the sand.’

“At a time when expensive new cancer treatments are proliferating rapidly, patients such as Mead-e have more therapy choices than ever before. Yet patients like him are largely kept in the dark because their doctors either can’t or won’t communicate clearly. Many patients compound the problem by avoiding news they don’t want to hear.”

Read this article in its entirety at California Healthline.

Link partners increase in each Service Area 13 County

NEW LINK PARTNERS

During the past month, the Pennsylvania Link to Aging and Disability Resources’ Berks – Lancaster – Lebanon Service Area continued to expand its partners’ network in each county.

These are new partners in the Berks County Partners Network:

See the complete list of partners for each county:

If you are an agency, entity or organization that provides services for persons age 60 and over; persons with a disability; veterans; family members and caregivers, consider aligning with one or more of these counties as a partner with the Pennsylvania Link to Aging and Disability Resources, contact us for information. There are no fees or charges to be a Link partner.

Call or text 717.380.9714 or email blllink@mail.com to let us know you want to become a Link partner.

 

Friday Wrap-Up, June 16, 2017 | a message from the Secretary of Aging

Each week the Office of the Secretary of Pennsylvania’s Department of Aging releases a Friday newsletter with information relevant to activities, issues and events for older Pennsylvanians and persons with disabilities across the Commonwealth.

Click here to download the newsletter as a .pdf file.

 

Friday Wrap-Up, June 9, 2017 | a message from the Secretary of Aging

Each week the Office of the Secretary of Pennsylvania’s Department of Aging releases a Friday newsletter with information relevant to activities, issues and events for older Pennsylvanians and persons with disabilities across the Commonwealth.

Click here to download the newsletter as a .pdf file. 

 

“The content of our lives – who cares enough to save it?” – Aging In Place Technology Watch

old photos

Imagine all the non-digital photos and memorabilia. Forget Airbnb and driving for Uber. Boomers with creativity, organizational skill and some technology can follow multiple small business paths that have large emotional implications for the customer. Consider the large and small albums of photos, cassette tapes, home movies – not just from the boomers aged 51-71, but from their parents, and even some from their parents’ parents. Will anyone want it? Cynics contend that not only will the old content be lost due to disinterest, but that current content (selfies, group photos, Facebook and Instagram shots of that great dinner) will also be lost, some say, to collective disinterest – the photo only mattering in the moment.”

Continue reading this brief article at Aging In Place Technology Watch.

“(Department of Homeland Security) DHS ANNOUNCES FY 2017 PREPAREDNESS GRANTS” – Administration for Community Living

“Grant programs address national security; public safety needs”

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has announced ten preparedness grant programs totaling $1.6 billion. The grant programs provide funding to state, local, tribal, and territorial governments, as well as transportation authorities, nonprofit organizations, and the private sector, to improve the nation’s readiness in preventing, protecting against, responding to, recovering from and mitigating terrorist attacks, major disasters and other emergencies.

Because older adults and people with disabilities will be affected by the programs and systems developed through these grants, ACL encourages all of the aging and disability partners to learn more about their state, tribal, or local efforts to secure this funding, and to get involved to ensure the people we serve are represented in these efforts.

The Notices of Funding Opportunity for these grants can be found at https://www.fema.gov/preparedness-non-disaster-grants (expand the last link on the page.  Further information can be found on www.grants.gov.

“1 in 3 People in Medicare is Now in Medicare Advantage, With Enrollment Still Concentrated Among a Handful of Insurers” – Kaiser Family Foundation

9037-figure-1“For the first time, 1 in every 3 people with Medicare is enrolled in Medicare Advantage, the private Medicare plans that have played an increasingly large role in the Medicare program over the past decade, according to a new analysis from the Kaiser Family Foundation.

“Medicare Advantage enrollment has more than tripled since 2004, reaching 19 million, or 33 percent of enrollees, in 2017, the analysis shows. That milestone is up from 17.6 million beneficiaries (31% ) in 2016, and 11.1 million beneficiaries (24%) in 2010, the year in which Congress reduced payments to Medicare Advantage plans as part of the Affordable Care Act. The Congressional Budget Office has projected that enrollment in Medicare Advantage will continue to rise, reaching 41 percent of all beneficiaries by 2026.

“Medicare Advantage enrollment continues to be highly concentrated among a handful of insurers, both nationally and in local markets, the new analysis shows. UnitedHealthcare and Humana together account for 41 percent of enrollment in 2017, for instance, and in 17 states one company has more than half of all Medicare Advantage enrollment – an indicator that these markets may not be very competitive. (Antitrust concerns – in Medicare Advantage and other insurance markets – scuttled recent proposed mergers between Humana and Aetna and Anthem and Cigna.)

“The new analysis, Medicare Advantage 2017 Spotlight: Enrollment Market Update, examines trends in this market, including premiums and cost sharing; enrollment and market penetration at the state- and large metropolitan county-level; Medicare Advantage enrollment by firm nationally; and market share of the top three Medicare Advantage firms by state.”