Category Archives: Aging

Fighting Fraud: Senate Aging Committee Identifies Top 10 Scams Targeting Our Nation’s Seniors

fighting fraud

Click on the graphic to download the guide as a .pdf file.

“Age Bias That’s Barred by Law Appears in Thousands of Job Listings” – AARP

aarp-age-bias-job-adsILLUSTRATION BY PAUL SPELLA

With the words they use, employers keep experienced workers from applying

by Kenneth Terrell

“‘This is an excellent opportunity for a recent college graduate looking to get their start in automotive!!’ reads a recent job posting on LinkedIn.

“‘The ideal candidate is a digital native that is fueled by big ideas, driven by measurable results and is inspired to lead,’ says another posting, also on LinkedIn, for a mid-level marketing position at Amazon.

“‘Current College Students — Now Hiring Product Demonstrators!’ says a third ad, from a company that specializes in product demonstrations and wants candidates with flexible hours.

“The common thread through these three postings: Each uses age-biased language that is discouraged by advocates for older workers and in some cases could be legal evidence of discrimination.”

Continue reading this article; click here.

“CPR, by Default: When very old patients suffer cardiac arrest, doctors usually try to revive them — even if they were already near death.” – The New York Times

older cprJames Steinberg

by Paula Span

“A few months ago, an ambulance brought a woman in her 90s to the emergency department at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

“Her metastatic breast cancer had entered its final stages, and she had begun home hospice care. Yet a family member who had discovered her unresponsive that morning had called 911.

“The paramedics determined that she was in cardiac arrest, began cardiopulmonary resuscitation and put a breathing tube down her throat.

“’It’s a common scenario,’ said Dr. Kei Ouchi, an emergency physician and researcher at Brigham and Women’s who reviews such cases. ‘And it’s not going to have a good outcome.’”

Continue reading this article at The New York Times; click here.

“Unlikely housemates: How a St. Louis startup matches empty nesters, millennials” – St. Louis Post Dispatch

odd couple housing“Amisha Wankede laughs with Sally Lorino as she prepares lunch for Lorino on Saturday, Jam. 4, 2020. Wankhede and Lorino Live together as a part of the Odd Couples Housing, a startup that matches seniors who have rooms to spare with younger adults, often students, looking for inexpensive housing. Photo by Troy Stolt.”

by Troy Stolt

“WENTZVILLE — When her husband died in a car accident, Karen Krienke, 65, found herself unexpectedly alone. Her home in Wentzville — once crowded with children — felt big and empty. Moreover, a bad back was slowing her down.

“Her daughter worried. “She’s so social,” said Jane Krienke, who lives in Washington, D.C. “I didn’t want her to be by herself.”

“Then, this summer, she found a St. Louis startup that matches older adults who have room to spare with millennials — often graduate students — who need a reasonably priced place to live.

odd couple housing 2

“Odd Couples Housing, which made its first match in late 2018, taps into a market driven by unprecedented growth in the over-65 population, baby boomers who want to remain in their homes but may be cash-strapped or could use help with household chores. So far, the company has made about 20 matches; it hopes to increase that tenfold by the end of this year.”

Continue reading this article at The St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

“Drinking and Healthy Aging: Know Your Limits”

alcohol-blog-headerby Paul Sacco, PhD MSW

“Alcohol use is common among seniors. Nearly half of older adults aged 65 and older report having consumed alcohol in the past year. They may have a drink at a social event or party, to enhance their mood, or as a means of coping with a difficult symptom such as insomnia. Some older adults even drink alcohol for perceived positive health effects.

“Although drinking and alcohol problems are less common in older adults than younger people, alcohol use in older adulthood brings specific risks for seniors. As we age, changes to our body composition and ability to metabolize alcohol mean that alcohol affects older adults more profoundly when they drink. Some evidence even suggests that older drinkers are less aware of these effects, even as they are experiencing them. Unhealthy drinking can lead to other problems over time, such as increased risk of falls, dangerous medication interactions, increased risk of cancer, and, in more severe cases, liver disease and early mortality.”

Read this article in its entirety at the National Council on Aging Website, click here.

 

WEBINAR: “Measuring home and community-based services for older adults and people with disabilities”

wellsky webinar

Register for this WEBINAR that will be held on February 5, 2020 at 2:00 pm eastern time.

Gain a deeper understanding of the factors that help older adults and people with disabilities maintain their independence, and to what degree publicly funded services are meeting those needs. This session examines a wealth of data to answer the questions:

  • What access does the aging and disabled community have to vital services like transportation, employment, and service coordination?
  • How do outcomes vary among programs funded by Medicaid, the Older Americans Act, and states?
  • Where can I go for data to guide the work of my agency?

“There are at least 4 different ways of aging, scientists say: One day, your ‘ageotype’ may inform your future health.” – NBC News

four ways to ageAdrian Lam / NBC News

by Erika Edwards

“Anyone who has attended a class reunion has seen firsthand that people age in different ways. Some former classmates appear to have aged a century within just a few decades, while others look just as they did fresh from 11th grade English class.

“Now, a study published Monday in Nature Medicine takes a deeper look at what’s going on at a molecular level, offering a possible explanation for why we age differently, and raising the tantalizing possibility that we could one day have an impact on our personal aging process through targeted medication or lifestyle changes.

“Still, the research — on what a group of Stanford University scientists are calling ‘ageotypes’ — is still in its infancy. But outside experts heralded the study as an important step toward learning more about aging.”

Read this article in its entirety, click here.

 

“Youth teaching tech to seniors fosters generational connections” – WITF

intergenerational

by Megan Kamerick

“The United States now has 46 million people age 65 or older. That’s a record number, according to a study by the Pew Research Center.

“More of these senior citizens are adopting technology, but most also say they need help using new electronic devices such as smart phones. Falling behind on technology puts seniors at risk for social isolation, which makes them vulnerable to poor health and earlier death. It’s also expensive. A study by AARP found isolation is associated with nearly $7 billion in additional annual spending by Medicare.

“A startup company in Albuquerque has made matching tech-savvy young people with seniors its mission. Teeniors coaches them on using smartphones, computers and tablets.”

Click here to continue reading this article at WITF.


Are there local programs in Berks, Lancaster & Lebanon Counties like this? Should there be? Let’s get the conversation started — email us at blllink@mail.com to share your thoughts.

“Prescription drug overload: Critics fighting to curb an epidemic of medication side effects” – The Boston Globe

medications

by Robert Weisman 

Are you taking too many meds?

“If you’re an older American, chances are your medicine cabinet is crammed with bottles of pills to reduce cholesterol, lower blood pressure, and treat everything from acid reflux to underactive thyroid.

“Forty-two percent of adults over 65 take five or more prescription drugs, and nearly 20 percent take 10 or more, according to the Lown Institute, a health care think tank in Brookline. The institute warns of a growing epidemic of overmedication that’s sent millions of seniors to hospitals and emergency rooms in the past decade with often serious side effects.

“Lown, which published a report on ‘medication overload” last year, will release a national action plan later this month alerting patients, caregivers, doctors, and pharmacists — as well as policy makers — to the perils of overprescribing. The plan was developed by a group of patient advocates, geriatricians, nurses, and health insurers concerned about the unintended consequences of the ‘pills for all ills’ mind-set.”

Continue reading this article at The Boston Globe, click here.

 

If you are a senior driver, take an online defensive driving course – AAA

 

safe driver

Take an Online Defensive Driving Course

AAA’s Roadwise™,  a senior defensive driving program is an online course designed to positively affect driving behavior and help you learn about and adjust to age-related physical changes. It can be taken online in the comfort of your home or wherever you have an Internet connection. The course covers topics like:

  • Extending Your Safe Driving Career
  • Distractions, Drowsiness, Aggressive Driving & Road Rage
  • Managing Visibility, Time & Space
  • Alcohol & Medications
  • Comfort & Safety Tips

AAA members, check with your local club for special benefits or discounts on the course. Automobile insurance discounts also may apply upon course completion, check with your insurance provider for details.

Educational offerings are not available in all areas. Contact your local AAA club for more information.


Raodwise

“Medications have both intended and unintended effects on your body, and these effects change based on the other medications that you’re taking and the foods that you eat. Not only does that affect how you feel, many of these effects can also impact your ability to safely drive.

Roadwise Rx is a tool designed to help you learn more about your medications and how they may affect your driving.

“Any information that you enter in this tool is completely confidential and cannot be viewed by any other party.”