Category Archives: Disabilitiies

Pennsylvania Assistive Technology Foundation (PATF) Offers Funding for Tablet Technology

tablet technology

Did you know that PATF offers partial grants for tablet technology to our Mini-Loan borrowers? That’s right — if you’re a Pennsylvanian with a disability planning to use a PATF Mini-Loan to pay for a tablet (for example, an iPad, Samsung Galaxy, Amazon Fire, etc.) we can provide a grant to offset the cost by up to 50% of the loan ($500 at most).

These loans also offer an opportunity to build credit, with 0% interest and no fees. Borrowers of ANY income level are eligible.

Please note: PATF does not extend grants only. If a loan applicant meets eligibility guidelines, PATF may be able to offer a partial grant in conjunction with a Mini-Loan.

Save money, build credit, and most importantly, get the assistive technology you need! Contact us for details. https://patf.us/contact/

 

American Girl Introduces Doll With Disability

american girl dollJoss Kendrick, who has congenital hearing loss, is American Girl’s 2020 Girl of the Year. (American Girl)

by Shaun Heasley
 

“With a new doll, the iconic American Girl lineup is for the first time telling the story of a girl with a developmental disability.

“The brand’s 2020 Girl of the Year has congenital hearing loss. Named Joss Kendrick, the character is deaf in her left ear but can hear a little in her right ear using a hearing aid.

“While American Girl has previously featured issues like stuttering and offered accessories including a wheelchair, hearing aids, service dogs and arm crutches, Joss is the brand’s first character to have a physical disability as part of her story, according to Julie Parks, a spokeswoman for American Girl.”

Click here to read this article at Disability Now.

“Careers & Degrees in Healthcare: A Guide for Students with Disabilities”

person in front of laptop

Healthcare can be a great career path for individuals with disabilities as they can provide valuable perspectives and experiences that directly benefit patients. However, they also face many unique challenges in school and later as professionals, and it can be difficult to know where to turn for quality information.

To help, EduMed produced a comprehensive guidebook that addresses these challenges, gives students career recommendations that accommodate their disabilities, helps explain their rights under the ADA, and much more. You can read the entire guide at the link below.

Careers & Degrees in Healthcare: Guide for Students with Disabilities


EduMed knows that higher education can be the ticket to a rewarding career in medical and health. We also know that every student needs different things when it comes to education, whether a fully online program to maximize flexibility or help finding and securing financial aid or scholarships. To get students moving in the right direction, we work with hundreds of healthcare and higher education experts to provide well-researched and user-friendly content, from detailed school rankings of schools and programs to interviews with online program leaders at colleges and universities across the country. Learn how EduMed can help you succeed.


SOURCE: provided

If you’re a person with a disability | Help test a voting system for use in Pennsylvania

help test a voting system

Deaf and Hard of Heating Directory of Resources and Services

resource directory

Directory of Services & Resources

This searchable directory has over 20 categories to allow you to quickly narrow your search by topic. Some categories include, captioning, sign language, and summer camps. If you would like to see your organization listed or need your existing listing updated, please utilize the available directory listing addition and change request forms below. Note: This directory contains an “interpreter referral agency” category, but does not list interpreters. To search for a registered interpreter, please visit our interpreter search database.

 

“‘It’s my escape.’ How video games help people cope with disabilities.” – The Washington Post

video games(Illustration by Matt Saunders for The Washington Post)

by Hawken Miller

When Jackson Reece lost his arms and legs to sepsis after already being paralyzed, he thought his life was over. It was video games that brought him back.

“‘I don’t think about being disabled when I’m in my gaming setup and talking to everyone,’ Reece, 33, said. ‘Just Jackson “pitbullreece,” just sitting here playing, and that’s what makes me me.’

“In the United States, one in four people have a disability, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Gaming allows many of them to do things in a virtual space they could only dream of in reality. It also helps them connect and overcome social anxiety and feelings of depression.

“‘It’s my escape,’ said Brian ‘Wheely’ McDonald, 31, who has arthrogryposis, causing the normally elastic tendons in his hands to stiffen. ‘I’m not disabled in video games. I have people telling me all the time how amazing I am at games.’”

Keep reading this article at The Washington Post, click here.

 

Self-Determination Housing Project Webinar Series: Assistance Animals Explained – October 17 at 2:30 PM

sdhp webinar

Do you have tenants, case workers, or other clientele that are requesting to have assistance animals in their unit?  Do you work with clients who are having to interact with hesitant landlords because they have a service animal?  If so, you might be wondering what rights tenants and landlords have when it comes to assistance animals.  Tune in to our webinar, Assistance Animals Explained, to find out:

  1. What SDHP does and how you can use our services
  2. What a reasonable accommodation is
  3. And rights both landlords and tenants have when it comes to assistance animals

Webinar scheduled for October 17, 2019 from 2:30 PM – 3:30 PM ET

This training is recommended for landlords and property managers, autism service coordinators, mental health caseworkers, ID housing caseworkers, hospital liaisons, and other providers serving individuals with disabilities.

Register for the webinar here, and feel free to share this information with colleagues and those in your network who are interested in this topic.

**If you have any questions about the training or need to request a disability related accommodation, please contact SDHP @ region1@sdhp.org.

“Medicare Shopping Season Is Almost Here” – The New York Times

“Every fall, the 60 million Americans who use the health plan can compare options and save money. Here’s what to consider.”

medicare

Credit: Corey Brickley

by Mark Miller

“If you’re enrolled in Medicare but worry about the cost of health care, your chance to do something about it is right around the corner.

“Most people enroll in Medicare when they become eligible at age 65. But every fall, they have the opportunity to change their coverage during an enrollment season that runs from Oct. 15 through Dec. 7. This is the time of year when you can switch between original fee-for-service Medicare and Medicare Advantage, the all-in-one managed care alternative to the traditional program. You also can re-evaluate your prescription drug coverage — whether that is a stand-alone Part D plan, or wrapped into an Advantage plan.

“It’s a good idea to do a checkup on your coverage, even if you are happy with your current choices.”

Keep reading this article at the New York Times, click here.


Free, Objective, Expert Medicare Counseling

The APPRISE program offers free Medicare counseling to older Pennsylvanians.  APPRISE counselors are specially trained to answer your questions and provide you with objective, easy-to-understand information about Medicare, Medicare Supplemental Insurance, Medicaid, and Long-Term Care Insurance.”

Each county’s Area Agency on Aging has APPRISE counselors to help you understand the options and opportunities.

“‘We Need Each Other’: Seniors Are Drawn to New Housing | Arrangements Older Americans are exploring housing alternatives, including villages and home-sharing.” – The New York Times

Finding a place to live for too many people is a serious challenge; co-housing or home sharing provides a viable option. This article, Here’s an idea worth “sharing.”, is about a test program that’s being used in northeast Pennsylvania. This article, too, takes a closer look at the concept of shared housing.

we need each otherCredit: Jackie Molloy for The New York Times

by 

“After her husband died, Freda Schaeffer was left on her own in a three-bedroom house in Brooklyn. ‘I was lonely,’ she confessed. And she worried about finances, because ‘there’s a lot of expenses in a house.’

“Tom Logan, who had moved east from California, found that his disability payments from the Department of Veterans Affairs didn’t stretch very far in New York City. ‘I needed a place to stay, or I could be homeless,’ he said.

“Enter the matchmaker, a home-sharing program operated by the New York Foundation for Senior Citizens. It pairs people who have extra living space — but want company, help with chores, extra income or all three — with those desperate for affordable housing.”

Read this article at The New York Times in its entirey, click here.

A person with a disability: What does that mean?

Frequently, we have conversations with people concerning disabilities — either with persons with a disability or others with questions about disabilities. It’s not easy finding a single definition of “disability.”

see the person

According to the ADA National Network,

“It is important to remember that in the context of the ADA, “disability” is a legal term rather than a medical one. Because it has a legal definition, the ADA’s definition of disability is different from how disability is defined under some other laws, such as for Social Security Disability related benefits.

“The ADA defines a person with a disability as a person who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activity. This includes people who have a record of such an impairment, even if they do not currently have a disability. It also includes individuals who do not have a disability but are regarded as having a disability. The ADA also makes it unlawful to discriminate against a person based on that person’s association with a person with a disability.”


“While some disabilities can be the result of accidents leading to paralysis, brain damage, etc., others are genetic, for example, cerebral palsy, spina bifida, Down syndrome, muscular dystrophy, blindness, etc. The disabled or differently abled have a different set of emotional and physical needs, which those around them have to be mindful of. Here’s a comprehensive guide with articles about various disabilities and the challenges associated with them.


Who is considered a person with a disability under Section 504 and the ADA?

“Section 504 and the Americans with Disabilities Act defines the terms ‘handicap’ or ‘disability’ with respect to an individual to mean a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more of the major life activities of such an individual. Included in the definition are people who have a record of such an impairment, or are regarded as having such an impairment. The definition of disability under Section 504 and the ADA differs from that typically used to determine eligibility in programs that provide cash assistance based upon disability such as the Federal Supplemental Security Income and Social Security Disability Insurance programs. This definition may also be different from that used by some States to determine whether an individual may be exempt from certain program rules in TANF. For more information on the definition of disability under Section 504, see 29 USC 705; under the ADA, see 42 USC 12102 – PDF.” – SOURCE: US Department of Health & Human Services


This information is from DisabledWorld.com, a website that has an enormous compendium of data about disabilities.

“Disability is a subject you may read or hear about, but not think of as something that may happen to you. However, your chances of becoming disabled are greater than you realize, today more people live with disabilities than ever before due to our aging societies, as well as improved medical treatment. Even celebrities and other famous people have, or develop, disabilities. Some people are born with a disability, others become disabled due to an illness or injury, and some develop them as they age. At some point in our lives almost all of us will have some type of disability.

disabled world

Facts from our Disability Statistics section include:

  • 33% of 20-year-old workers will become disabled before reaching retirement age.
  • Over a billion people, around 15% of the world’s population, have some form of disability.
  • There are approximately 3.3 Million wheelchair users in the U.S and the number is increasing every year.
  • Rates of disability are increasing due to world population aging and increases in chronic health conditions.
  • 1 in 4 US adults (61M) have a disability that impacts major life activities – CDC Morbidity & Mortality Report, 2018-8-17.
  • 93-95% of people with disabilities worldwide do not use a wheelchair, though the universal disability symbol is – a wheelchair.