Category Archives: Transportation

Seven Quality of Life Nursing Home Transition Grants from the Paralysis Resource Center Announced

reeve foundation logo

reeve foundation

Short Hills, N.J. (July 13, 2017)- The Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation, a national nonprofit dedicated to improving quality of life for individuals living with paralysis, is awarding seven Quality of Life Nursing Home Transition (NHT) grants totaling $280,000 to seven Centers for Independent Living (CILs) nationwide. Quality of Life grants of $40,000 support fellow nonprofits that mirror the Reeve Foundation’s mission and commitment to foster community engagement, enhance independence, and promote healthy self-esteem. The Quality of Life Grant program to date has awarded more than $22 million in grants to more than 2,900 programs since its inception in 1999. Funding for the grants is made available through the Paralysis Resource Center (PRC) operated by the Reeve Foundation under a cooperative agreement with the Administration for Community Living at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

The PRC’s Nursing Home Transition Grant Program funds Centers for Independent Living across the country to transition people with paralysis living in nursing homes back into their homes or a community-based setting of their choice. Under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) passed in 2014, CILs are charged with supporting individuals to transition into community-based settings as a new core service, but CILs often lack the resources to do so robustly. The PRC’s NHT grants serve to supplement the work CILs are already doing to fulfill their responsibilities under WIOA and to help achieve the Reeve Foundation and ACL’s shared mission of full community participation for people with disabilities. For this grant, paralysis is functionally defined as a difficulty and/or inability to move one’s arms and/or legs due to a neurological condition such as spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, spina bifida, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, ALS, and many other chronic conditions that coexist with developmental, congenital, and acquired disabilities.

“These grants are intended to improve the quality of life for individuals by becoming part of the solution nationwide to decrease the unnecessary segregation and isolation of individuals living with functional paralysis,” said Maggie Goldberg, VP of Policy and Programs at the Reeve Foundation. “Our new program funding allows us to further help the aging and paralysis populations and create more community inclusion, which is our ultimate goal. We are excited to have this opportunity to expand our grant program, and hope to work with them again in the future.”

These organizations were awarded 2017 Nursing Home Transition Grants:

  • Communities Actively Living Independent & Free (CALIF), Los Angeles, CA
  • Kansas Association of Centers for Independent Living, Topeka, KS
  • Liberty Resources, Inc., Philadelphia, PA
  • Memphis Center for Independent Living, Memphis, TN
  • Progressive Independence, Norman, OK
  • Resource Center for Independent Living, Inc., Utica, NY
  • The Whole Person, Kansas City,MO

These applicants were chosen based on their innovative project designs and scaling up capacity. These funds will allow flexibility in purchasing a variety of nursing home transition needs that are not currently covered by other funding sources such as rental and utility deposits; first month’s rent; moving costs; and startup cost and services. The majority of the funds will be used to purchase home furnishings, assistive technology, personal care attendant services, and internet access. These CILs will also now be able to hire more staff or increase staff hours to help address rural isolation, assist very low income individuals, and provide post transition services.

SOURCE: news release

NPR : “Workplaces Can Be Particularly Stressful For Disabled Americans, Poll Finds”

disability employmentJason Olsen, a 39-year-old policy advisor for the Department of Labor and uses the Washington, D.C., Metro to commute to work three times a week. On the other days of the week Olsen telecommutes from home to avoid the challenge of taking the Metro. Ruby Wallau/NPR

“More than 4 in 10 working Americans say their job affects their overall health, with stress being cited most often as having a negative impact.

“That’s according to a new survey about the workplace and health from NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health.

“While it may not sound so surprising that work affects health, when we looked more closely, we found one group was particularly affected by stress on the job: the disabled.

“More than 60 percent of people with a disability in our poll say their job has a bad impact on their stress level.

“Jason Olsen says he’s not surprised by the poll’s findings. As I met him at his home in Gaithersburg, Md., we start trading commuter complaints. Traffic was terrible getting here, I say.

“But his story wins out.”

Read Jason’s story and the rest of this NPR article here.

Need help identifying long term services and supports, read this!

dhsirt

Here’s a Webpage with a “tool (that) will help you and/or your caregiver to identify beneficial long term services and supports based on your specific needs. This tool is NOT meant to: tell you if you qualify for services; provide a diagnosis; and it will not save any information on any specific individual.

If you have any questions or require any assistance, please call the PA Link Call Center at 1-(800)-753-8827.

Accessible Air Travel: A guide for People with Disabilities

accessible air travel

Click on the graphic above or here to download this guide.

 

“When your call’s no emergency, use 211; it’s free and it’s local” – LNP – Always Lancaster Editorial

2-1-1

“There is a number to receive non-emergency help: It’s 2-1-1 and the local referral service is confidential, free and based right here in Lancaster County. Pennsylvania 2-1-1 East, run by the United Way of Lancaster County, serves Lancaster, Berks and five other counties.”

This editorial in the July 22, 2015 LNP – Always Lancaster newspaper points to 2-1-1 as the go-to place to get help for for services that are not immediately life threatening.

Looking Ahead: Pennsylvania Population Projections 2010 to 2040

This report prepared by The Center for Rural Pennsylvania identifies “The implications from these projections underscore the challenges of slow and somewhat uneven population growth and an aging population. They also highlight the opportunities of population growth through in-migration.”

“From 2010 to 2040, Pennsylvania is projected to gain 1.42 million people. Ninety percent of these new residents are projected to live in urban counties and 10 percent in rural counties. [NOTE: Each of the counties in Pennsylvania Link to Aging and Disability Resources Service Area 13 – Berks, Lancaster and Lebanon – are urban counties.]

county growth

“While rural Pennsylvania is projected to have a 4 percent increase in population, urban counties are projected to have a 14 percent increase and the U.S. is projected to have a 23 percent increase.

“Rural Pennsylvania’s population will continue to grow slowly, and still somewhat unevenly, as 18 rural counties are projected to see population declines. However, 30 rural counties are projected to experience population increases.

“The bulk of the population gains in rural counties will be attributed to in-migration rather than natural change, as the projections indicate that rural Pennsylvania counties will have more deaths than births from 2010 to 2040. The main driver of the negative natural change is the rapid increase in the number of deaths. From 2010 to 2040, the number of deaths in rural Pennsylvania is expected to increase 25 percent, which far outpace the expected number of births, which are projected to increase only 5 percent.

“In-migration, on the other hand, is projected to trend upward. Rural counties are projected to see a 5 percent increase in in-migration. The majority of these new rural residents will come from overseas.

“Another continuing trend is the aging of rural Pennsylvania. This trend is being fueled, in part, by aging baby boomers (persons born between 1946 and 1964) and a slowly increasing birth rate. From 2010 to 2040, the number of rural senior citizens is projected to increase 54 percent while the number of youth is projected to decline 3 percent. Urban counties are projected to see a 5 percent increase in youth and a 72 percent increase in senior citizens.

To download the report, click here.

Berks – Lancaster – Lebanon area projected to have more than 20% more people by 2040

population growth

The March 2014 report, “Pennsylvania Population Projections 2010-2040” shows remarkable population increases for the Berks – Lancaster – Lebanon Counties area. Based on the population data projection, the area will have 20.7% more people than in 2010.

“Population data are used by public and private agencies and businesses in numerous ways for policy development, project planning, and program evaluation. Policy and program development often require information on how the state’s population is expected to change over the next 5, 10, or 15 years. Data are especially needed to plan for schools, transportation, day care and elderly care centers, work force development, long-term care, and many other areas. While the decennial census and affiliated survey programs are rich sources of data on the social and economic characteristics of Pennsylvania’s residents, each census/survey presents a static portrait of life in the commonwealth at one fixed point in time. Projections provide a way to look at future population.

“If the projections are accurate, the population of Pennsylvania will increase to 14.1 million in 2040, up from 12.7 million in 2010. Almost 72 percent of the increase will be due to domestic net-migration or overseas migrants arriving from 2010 to 2040, with overseas migrants accounting for more than 85 percent of this portion of the increase. The remaining 28 percent of the increase during this period is due to natural increase (births exceeding deaths).

“The projections also provide an analysis of Pennsylvania’s future ‘dependency ratio’ – the ratio of the economically dependent part of the population to the productive part; arbitrarily defined as the ratio of the elderly (those 65 years and over) plus the young (those under 20 years of age) to the population in the ‘working ages’ (those 20-64 years of age). There were 68 children and elderly people per 100 adults of working age in 20102. That number will rise to 86 dependents per 100 adults of working age in 2040.” – SOURCE – “Pennsylvania Population Projections 2010-2040” report.

 

PA 2-1-1 is an easy number to remember for health and human service information for Pennsylvanians

211-east-logo

Pennsylvania 2-1-1 East is a free, confidential, non-emergency, comprehensive information and referral service that connects Berks, Lancaster, Lehigh and Northampton county residents with the health and human services they need.

211

PA 2-1-1 is a statewide collaborative for health and human service information for Pennsylvanians.

“RRTA, Berks transit merger complete” – Lancaster Online

“Lancaster County officials and Red Red Rose Transit Authority leaders took a little trip just over the Berks County line Thursday morning to meet with their Berks counterparts — and celebrate a transit consolidation nearly a year in the making.

“They have established the new South Central Transit Authority to oversee both the Lancaster-area RRTA and the Berks Area Regional Transit Authority.

“The RRTA name and logo on buses, as with BARTA in Berks, will not change, and the public may not notice much of a difference, transit official David Kilmer said Thursday,

“‘We’re on a good track, and ready to move forward,’ said Kilmer, who was named executive director of the new SCTA, which will oversee operations of both RRTA and BARTA.”

Click here to read this article in its entirety.

Free E-Book: The Aging Well Revolution

Download this latest book about new options for how and where we’ll live as we age.

aging well revolution book“How and where will we live as we age? Who will take care of us when we need help? As millions of baby boomers provide and coordinate care for their elderly parents, they’re asking these questions for themselves.”

As millions of baby boomers provide and coordinate care for their elderly parents, they’re asking themselves tough questions about their own options for aging in place and long-term care solutions.

This free ebook in English and Spanish (if you have a Kindle device, download free from Amazon here) gathers ideas about emerging communities and technologies that will offer boomers choices about how to live independently for as long as possible. From joining an artists’ colony to using a robot helper, the range of ideas show exciting possibilities.

To download the book, in English or Spanish, click on one of these links.

The Aging Well Revolution

La revolución del envejecimiento bueno