Category Archives: Technology

Town Hall Meeting – November 9 | Learn more about programs and services that allow individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing, deafblind or have difficulty speaking to communicate over the phone

town hall 11-9

Download the above as a .pdf for sharing and printing here

Constance: “helping in the care of your aging loved one” | A FREE “trial service” offer

Constance wants to help you care for your aging loved one. We will partner with you by offering you peace of mind and the assurance that you — and they — are not alone.

“We are offering a trial subscription to our basic ‘One Call’ service. One of our friendly, qualified Family Coordinators will call your loved one regularly, asking them basic questions about their mood, diet, and schedule.”

constance

To participate in this free trial of this service, sign up today.

There’s No Place Like Home | New support for those caring for aging loved ones.

As time passes and technology advances, trends come and go, but we think one is here to stay: Aging in place. As the population ages, more and more people are choosing to stay in their own homes longer, or permanently. For some, it’s not a choice: “There is no place like home. Home is where the heart is.”

A study by AARP revealed most seniors share that belief: 90% of seniors stated they plan to live in their own homes for at least the next 5 to 10 years. While the desire to remain at home might be driven by sentimentalities, or by the wish to remain independent and in control, the cost of retirement communities isn’t convincing anyone to pack their bags. Entrance fees to these communities can cost upwards of $100,000, and additional monthly living expenses typically range from $2,000 to $4,000.

New Challenges | Remaining at home doesn’t come without its challenges, and this is especially true as those aging in place begin to require more care and assistance to stay safely at home.

The seniors’ children often fill the caregiver role, assisting their parents in various ways to ensure they are safe and have everything they need while alone at home. This can be difficult, however, as they often have their own nuclear family responsibilities and work commitments to attend to. Two challenges are overwhelmingly present across varying caregiver situations: 1) 24 hours a day is not enough time to manage their loved one’s care, and 2) there is almost constant stress and worry as they think about their loved one’s well-being at home. A majority of caregivers wish they had more help in managing their loved one’s care, and often, they don’t have anyone to help them. That’s why we created Constance.

A New Solution | Constance brings peace of mind to families caring for seniors. With Constance, families know there is always someone looking after their loved one. And when they need help, things will get done with little hassle. Constance calls several seniors every day, to talk about what they’ve eaten, what their plans are, and to make sure they have everything they need. Family members receive a report after the conversation, to let them know how their loved one is doing that day. 

It’s Time | If you or someone you know is grappling with the challenges of caring for an aging loved one, there is an opportunity to participate in the support Constance has to offer.

Let us help!
717-500-1386
hello@constance.one

SOURCE: submitted

The Friendship Line | a 24-hour toll-free hotline/warmline for older and disabled adults

friendship line

The Institute on Aging’s 24-hour toll-free Friendship Line is the only accredited crisis line in the country for people aged 60 years and older, and adults living with disabilities. We also make on-going outreach calls to lonely older adults.

Referrals

Phone: 415.750.4111

To make a referral right now, please fill out the Friendship Line Intake Form.

 

 

“Nearly half of cellphone calls will be scams by 2019, report says” – The Washington Post

This article is so important — not only for the people we serve — but for everyone you know. We’ve already posted it at the Link to Aging and Disability Resources facebook pages.

robocalls mobileEver get a phone call from a number that looks suspiciously like your own? This video explains them, and what you should do about them.” 

by Hazma Shaban

“Nearly half of all cellphone calls next year will come from scammers, according to First Orion, a company that provides phone carriers and their customers caller ID and call blocking technology.

“The Arkansas-based firm projects an explosion of incoming spam calls, marking a leap from 3.7 percent of total calls in 2017 to more than 29 percent this year, to a projected 45 percent by early 2019.

“’Year after year, the scam-call epidemic bombards consumers at record-breaking levels, surpassing the previous year, and scammers increasingly invade our privacy at new extremes,’ Charles Morgan, the chief executive and head data scientist of First Orion, said in a blog post last week.”

Read this article in The Washington Post in its entirety, click here.

“Sex, technology and disability – it’s complicated” – The Conversation

complicated“Media portrayals of sexuality often focus on a visual and verbal vocabulary that is young, white, cisgender, heterosexual and…not disabled.” from http://www.shutterstock.com

by Phillippa Carnemola

“People living with disability are largely excluded from conversations about sexuality, and face overlapping barriers to sexual expression that are both social and physical.

“Media portrayals of sexuality often focus on a visual and verbal vocabulary that is young, white, cisgender, heterosexual and … not disabled.

“My research into inclusive design explores how design can – intentionally or unintentionally – exclude marginalised or vulnerable people, as well as how design can ensure that everyone is included. That might mean design of the built environment, everyday products, or even how information is presented.”

Keep reading this article at The Conversation, click here.

 

Pennsylvania Assistive Technology Foundation (PATF) receives $25,000 grant to help more people with disabilities achieve independence

King of Prussia, PA  – The Pennsylvania Assistive Technology Foundation (PATF) at 1004 Ninth Avenue in King of Prussia, PA has received a $25,000 grant from the House of Rest Endowment Fund of The Philadelphia Foundation to expand its financial products into southeast Pennsylvania. Announcement of the grant was made by Pedro A. Ramos, President and CEO of the Foundation.

Susan Tachau, Executive Director of PATF, said the funds would be used to increase the number of people with disabilities and older Pennsylvanians in southeast Pennsylvania who will be able to finance the assistive technology they need in order to lead more independent lives. “Assistive technology (AT) is any item, piece of equipment, or product system, whether acquired commercially, modified, or customized, that is used to increase, maintain or improve functional capabilities of individuals with disabilities,” said Tachau. Adapted AT devices may include such items as:

  • Adapted Vehicles;
  • Computers, iPads, and tablet software and hardware;
  • Smart home technology such as (but not limited to) the Amazon Echo, Google Home, Nest, Ring, etc.;
  • Adapted sports equipment;
  • Hearing aids and other devices for people who are Deaf/Hard of Hearing;
  • Home modifications (ramps, showers, counter tops);
  • Scooters and wheelchairs;
  • Seat lift chairs; and
  • Safety and security devices.

patf logo

Through loans valued at more than $37 million and with over 14,000 Pennsylvanians helped since its founding in 1998, PATF is considered one of the nation’s largest and most comprehensiveAlternative Financing Programs (AFP). To learn more about PATF’s loan products, financial education curriculum, and development services, please visit www.patf.us.

Technology | Meet the grandPad

“Technology has become fully integrated into our daily lives; smart phones, tablets, laptops, and other devices connect us to the world at large and allow us to share in the lives of our close friends and family. Seniors across the globe have tried with varying success to embrace technology to stay in touch with loved ones and perform basic functions at home.

“Tablet devices, with their array of options, menus, and applications, can prove too difficult for most seniors to effectively use. As such, many companies have developed tablets designed specifically for seniors as a way to boost revenue and reach this key demographic. But are these tablets really worth the investment? This infographic from grandPad helps highlight key features of the grandPad tablet, other senior tablets, and the standard tablets on the market.

We’re sharing this link and infographic received in an email from next avenue. This is not an endorsement but is shared in the interest of information sharing.

“Not only do Next Avenue readers get a special discount, but for every grandPad sold using the code nextave, grandPad will make a contribution to Next Avenue that helps support our non-profit journalism.”

The Annual Plan (regularly $65.50)$49 /month – billed upfront annually.

“AI spots Alzheimer’s brain changes years before symptoms emerge” – New Scientist

ai“MRI scans may help identify early signs of the disease -baranozdemir/Getty”

“Artificial intelligence can identify changes in the brains of people likely to get Alzheimer’s disease almost a decade before doctors can diagnose the disease from symptoms alone.

“The technique uses non-invasive MRI scans to identify alterations in how regions of the brain are connected.

“Alzheimer’s is a neurodegenerative disease that is the leading cause of dementia for the elderly, eventually leading to loss of memory and cognitive functions.

“The race is on to diagnose the disease as early as possible. Although there is no cure, drugs in development are likely to work better the earlier they are given. An early diagnosis can also allow people to start making lifestyle changes to help slow the progression of the disease.”

Click here to read this New Scientist article in its entirety.

“Blind Patients to Test Bionic Eye Brain Implants | prosthesis could help more people who have lost their vision than a device already on the market.” – MIT Technology Review

blind to sight

by Emily Mullin

“The maker of the world’s first commercial artificial retina, which provides partial sight to people with a certain form of blindness, is launching a clinical trial for a brain implant designed to restore vision to more patients.

“The company, Second Sight, is testing whether an array of electrodes placed on the surface of the brain can return limited vision to people who have gone partially or completely blind. For decades, scientists have been trying to develop brain implants to give sight back to the blind but have had limited success. If the Second Sight device works, it could help millions of blind patients worldwide, including those who have lost one or both eyes.

“The device, called the Orion, is a modified version of the company’s current Argus II bionic eye, which involves a pair of glasses outfitted with a camera and an external processor. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted the company a conditional approval for a small study involving five patients at two sites, Baylor College of Medicine and the University of California, Los Angeles.”

Continue reading this article at the MIT Technology Review.

NOW AVAILABLE: The Promise of Assistive Technology to Enhance Activity and Work Participation

promise of assistive technology

“The U.S. Census Bureau has reported that 56.7 million Americans had some type of disability in 2010, which represents 18.7 percent of the civilian noninstitutionalized population included in the 2010 Survey of Income and Program Participation. The U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA) provides disability benefits through the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program and the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. As of December 2015, approximately 11 million individuals were SSDI beneficiaries, and about 8 million were SSI beneficiaries.

“SSA currently considers assistive devices in the nonmedical and medical areas of its program guidelines. During determinations of substantial gainful activity and income eligibility for SSI benefits, the reasonable cost of items, devices, or services applicants need to enable them to work with their impairment is subtracted from eligible earnings, even if those items or services are used for activities of daily living in addition to work. In addition, SSA considers assistive devices in its medical disability determination process and assessment of work capacity.

“The Promise of Assistive Technology to Enhance Activity and Work Participation provides an analysis of selected assistive products and technologies, including wheeled and seated mobility devices, upper-extremity prostheses, and products and technologies selected by the committee that pertain to hearing and to communication and speech in adults.

SOURCE: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Promise of Assistive Technology to Enhance Activity and Work Participation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/24740.