Category Archives: Health

Landis Communities and Friends Life Care Join to Launch Continuing Care at Home program in Lancaster and Lebanon Counties

landis

Lititz, PA – Landis Communities is pleased to announce that it has entered into an agreement with Friends Life Care to launch a Continuing Care at Home (CCaH) program in Lancaster and Lebanon counties. This arrangement will allow both organizations to expand their missions through the innovative Friends Life Care service and exceptional senior care. This new offering is a membership-based program designed to help people remain in their home as they age and can be utilized for care at home, if and when needed, and even residence-based care as those needs may evolve. The program, launching in October 2018, will therefore give older adults another option to remain living where they choose for as long as possible.

“Friends Life Care offers the first and largest continuing care at home program in the country,” explained Evon Bergey, VP of Community Initiatives at Landis Communities. “The Friends Life Care program provides a truly unique combination of care coordination and financial benefit needed to help ensure older adults have the resources and support that they will need to remain in their own homes as they age. If care is ever needed, it will be coordinated by Friends Life Care and provided by our trusted network of caregivers.”

“We are delighted to join resources with Landis Communities and bring our distinctive services to Lancaster and Lebanon Counties,” said Carol A. Barbour, president of Friends Life Care. “Friends Life Care’s philosophy is centered upon vitality, independence, growth and resilience and enables us to launch and maintain a strong partnership with Landis Communities.”

The composition of America’s aging population is changing greatly, mainly due to the very important baby boomer generation. The U.S. Census Bureau reports that 8.7 million people will be 85 or older by 2030 — the year when all baby boomers join the 65 and older population. According to research, nearly 90% of people want to stay in their own home as they age. This partnership with Friends Life Care to expand the time-tested Continuing Care at Home program provides people with more options to age in place.

Landis Communities and Friends Life Care will begin holding informational seminars in October 2018. These seminars will provide additional detailed information regarding membership in the Continuing Care at Home program. Online webinars will also be made available.


Landis Communities owns and operates Landis Homes, a Continuing Care Retirement Community/ Life Plan Community serving nearly 900 residents, in addition to a number of living options and services for seniors in the area. Friends Life Care is a not-for-profit, mission-focused Quaker-Based organization known for its expertise, integrity and product strength, all vital components for a successful partnership with Landis Communities. More information about Friends Life Care and Landis Communities and dates for seminars and webinars can be found at www.FriendsLifeCare.org/Landis or by calling 1-844-2Landis (1-844-252-6347)


Landis Communities delivers an array of services and housing options throughout the Lancaster County area. Known for enriching lives, they provide caring, high quality service to persons helping them live full lives with access to the services they need. Landis Communities began in the early 1960s when Eastern Mennonite Board of Missions and Charities (now EMM) started exploring how they might develop a community for retired mission workers, pastors and others. The organization now operates across a widening spectrum of services based on personal preferences, physical needs and financial resources. Landis Communities is a conference related ministry of LMC: A Fellowship of Anabaptist Churches and Atlantic Coast Conference of Mennonite Church USA. 

Friends Life Care offers long-term care protection by providing wellness programs, home health care, related personal care services and facility care to enrolled members in the Philadelphia and Delaware areas. Individuals and couples become members of Friends Life Care in order to protect their independence, guard their financial security and gain peace of mind. All member care is coordinated by a team of credentialed and selected professionals and provided by carefully screened aides.

 

“Before the fall: How oldsters can avoid one of old age’s most dangerous events” – The Conversation

fall“Falls are the No. 1 cause of accidental death in people 65 and older and a major cause of disability.” Photographee.eu/Shutterstock.com

“Baby boomers, who once viewed themselves as the coolest generation in history, are now turning their thoughts away from such things as partying and touring alongside rock bands to how to they can stay healthy as they age. And, one of the most important parts of healthy aging is avoiding a fall, the number one cause of accidental death among people 65 and older.

“The issue is growing more pressing each day. More adults than ever – 46 million – are 65 and older, and their numbers are increasing rapidly.

“The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that one in four older adults will fall each year. ”

Read this article in its entirety at The Conversation.

“How to Get Strong” – The New York Times

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by Anahad O’Connor

“Everyone knows that exercise is one of the best things you can do for your health. But most people ignore one crucial component of it: resistance training. According to federal researchers, only 6 percent of adults do the recommended minimum amount of at least two muscle-strengthening workouts each week. Neglecting resistance training – any type of workout that builds strength and muscle – is a big mistake. It increases your metabolism, lowers your body fat and protects you from some of the leading causes of early death and disability. You don’t have to lift like a bodybuilder (or look like one) to benefit from resistance training. And it’s never too late to get started. Here is everything you need to know … ”

Click here to read this New York Times article.

“Preventing Muscle Loss as We Age” – The New York Times

“Sarcopenia, a decline in skeletal muscle in older people, contributes to loss of independence.”

preventing muscle lossGracia Lam

by Jane E. Brody

“‘Use it or lose it.’ I’m sure you’re familiar with this advice. And I hope you’ve been following it. I certainly thought I was. I usually do two physical activities a day, alternating among walking, cycling and swimming. I do floor exercises for my back daily, walk up and down many stairs and tackle myriad physical tasks in and around my home.

“My young friends at the Y say I’m in great shape, and I suppose I am compared to most 77-year-old women in America today. But I’ve noticed in recent years that I’m not as strong as I used to be. Loads I once carried rather easily are now difficult, and some are impossible.

“Thanks to an admonition from a savvy physical therapist, Marilyn Moffat, a professor at New York University, I now know why. I, like many people past 50, have a condition called sarcopenia — a decline in skeletal muscle with age.”

Continue reading this New York Times article, click here.

 

“Avoidable Sepsis Infections Send Thousands Of Seniors To Gruesome Deaths” – California HealthLine

“No one tracks sepsis cases closely enough to know how often these severe infections turn fatal. But the toll — both human and financial — is enormous, finds an investigation by KHN and the Chicago Tribune.”

sepsis2

By Fred Schulte and Elizabeth Lucas and Joe Mahr, Chicago Tribune

“Shana Dorsey first caught sight of the purplish wound on her father’s lower back as he lay in a suburban Chicago hospital bed a few weeks before his death.

“Her father, Willie Jackson, had grimaced as nursing aides turned his frail body, exposing the deep skin ulcer, also known as a pressure sore or bedsore.

“‘That was truly the first time I saw how much pain my dad was in,’ Dorsey said.

“The staff at Lakeview Rehabilitation and Nursing Center, she said, never told her the seriousness of the pressure sore, which led to sepsis, a severe infection that can quickly turn deadly if not cared for properly. While a resident of Lakeview and another area nursing home, Jackson required several trips to hospitals for intravenous antibiotics and other sepsis care, including painful surgeries to cut away dead skin around the wound, court records show.

“Dorsey is suing the nursing center for negligence and wrongful death in caring for her dad, who died at age 85 in March 2014.”

Read this article in its entirety, click here.

“Experts say early preparation aids in aging well” – The Tribune-Democrat

health matters“Rita Mizak (top left), YMCA aquatics instructor, leads a water walking class Friday May 18, 2018, for local retired professikonals who have been taking the class for 30 years.” – photo by Thomas Slusser – The Tribune-Democrat

by Randy Griffith

“It’s not your grandparents’ old age.

“With access to clean water, vaccinations, waste removal, electricity and refrigerators, people are not only surviving to live longer, they are remaining active and living better in their senior years.

“As the late George Burns famously said: ‘You can’t help getting older, but you don’t have to get old.’

“Some are calling it the longevity revolution.

“Based on current life expectancy and average health quality, the World Health Organizations suggests that people in developed nations are ‘young’ until they are 65, ‘middle aged’ up to 79 and ‘elderly’ until they hit 100. Then they are ‘long-lived elderly.’”

Read this Tribune-Democrat article in its entirety, click here.

“The 17th Century Guide to Sleep” -History Today

“Despite the modern obsession with a good night’s rest, more of us are sleeping less. Perhaps we should pay attention to the advice of early modern doctors.”14.40.611“Detail from A Maid Asleep by Johannes Vermeer, c.1656–57.”

by Katharine A. Craik

Sleep is an urgent topic for neuroscientists and now more than ever is known about its crucial importance for concentration and memory formation. Despite all this, the western world spends fewer and fewer hours asleep. With human interaction increasingly taking place in timeless virtual spaces, our time spent asleep is shortening and our working days are lengthening, with profound implications for the quality of the lives we lead. In particular, the impact of light-emitting screens upon the circadian rhythms, so essential to well-being, are only just becoming apparent. A similar debate took place during the Enlightenment when artificial lighting offered many people the novel opportunity to manipulate their hours of wakeful productivity. But the origins of sleep science lie centuries earlier, in Renaissance theories about the body’s sensitivity to light and darkness.

“The science of sleep was developing rapidly in the 17th century, when rest was regarded as one of the core factors for maintaining good health, along with other essential ‘non-naturals’ such as air, food and drink. Most writers agreed that the optimum quantity of sleep lay somewhere between seven and nine hours and that its health-giving benefits were many and varied. The medical literature of the time however suggests that people – then as now – were often plagued by slumber’s elusiveness.”

Click here to read this article in its entirety at History Today.

 

How Farmers Markets Help End Hunger in PA

farmers markets

Farmers markets are bringing more fresh, local produce to the doorsteps of low-income neighborhoods by giving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program recipients the power to purchase nutritious food with their EBT cards.

In 2017, 7,377 farmers and farmers markets accepted SNAP benefits across the United States, providing low-income consumers with access to fresh, healthy foods, while helping local farmers. Find a participating farmers market near you.

From June through November, the WIC and Senior Farmers Market Nutrition Programs provide low-income seniors and eligible participants in the WIC program with vouchers to purchase Pennsylvania-grown fruits, vegetables, and fresh-cut herbs from approved farm markets and farm stands across the commonwealth.

Read these related articles:

SOURCE: news release

“Alan Alda living with Parkinson’s – a neurologist explains treatment advances” – The Conversation

aldaAlan Alda at en event in New York City, May 23, 2017. Diego Corredor/AP Photo

“For many, hearing the word ‘Parkinson’s’ conjures an image of tremors. But Parkinson’s disease, brought about by loss of nerve and other brain cells, is actually an incredibly complex movement disorder that can cause symptoms as wide-ranging as smell loss, thinking issues, depression and swallowing problems. More than 1.5 million people in the U.S. have the illness, and millions more loved ones and caregivers are affected by it, too.

“Actor Alan Alda announced July 31 that he is one of those. Alda has been living with Parkinson’s for more than a year. He stressed in his announcement that he has been living a full and happy life.

“He is not alone. Thanks to medical advances and better treatments, both patients and physicians understand that Parkinson’s is a livable disease, and that people with this condition can be happy, healthy and successful.”

Continue reading this article at The Conversation, click here.

All public housing will become smoke-free this week

non smoking

Public housing nationwide is set to go smoke-free this week. Under a 2017 rule issued by the Department of Housing and Urban Development, all public housing in the U.S. must have a smoke-free policy in place by July 31.

That ban includes all combustible tobacco products and applies to all residences, offices, and outdoor areas within 25 feet of housing and office buildings. Public health groups have cheered the rule and HUD’s work over the past year with local housing agencies to help public housing units make the transition. But some experts have also raised concerns about whether people who live in public housing have adequate access to smoking cessation treatment.

“HUD’S SMOKE-FREE PUBLIC HOUSING RULE: AN OVERVIEW”

Lebanon Family Health Services is one area agency that offers FREE tobacco cessation programs.

Other FREE tobacco cessation programs are: