Category Archives: Health

“Spinal implant helps three paralysed men walk again” – BBC

Three paralysed men, who were told they would spend the rest of their lives in a wheelchair, are able to walk again thanks to doctors in Switzerland.

spinal implant

“An electrical device inserted around the men’s spines boosted signals from their brains to their legs.

“And it also helped damaged nerves in the spinal cord to regrow.

“The researchers hope that this unexpected bonus will enable some paralysed people ultimately to regain independent movement.

“BBC News has had exclusive access to the patients in the clinical trial, the results of which are published in the journal Nature.

The first patient to be treated was 30-year-old Swiss man David M’zee, who suffered a severe spinal injury seven years ago in a sporting accident.”

Click here to continue reading this BBC article.

“What is ‘quality’ in aged care? Here’s what studies (and our readers) say” – The Conversation

quality aging care

Though this article comes from the Australian version of The Conversation, “Everyone has their own idea of what quality of care and quality of life in residential aged care may look like. The Conversation asked readers how they would want a loved one to be cared for in a residential aged care facility. What they said was similar to what surveys around the world have consistently found.

Click here to read the article in its entirety.

 

Friday Wrap-Up, October 12, 2018 | a message from the Secretary of Aging

lgbtq aging summit

Each week the Office of the Secretary of Pennsylvania’s Department of Aging releases a Friday newsletter with information relevant to activities, issues and events for older Pennsylvanians and persons with disabilities across the Commonwealth.

Click here download the newsletter as a .pdf file.

 

UDS Presents on Quality Measures for Home and Community Based Services

uds logo

United Disabilities Services (UDS) was inducted onto the faculty to present at the Health Care Quality Congress held in Dallas, Texas this October.  The Quality Congress is an official event held by the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA).  The title of UDS’s educational session was “Merging Social & Medical Models in Home and Community Based Services to fully embrace Person Centered Care through Quality Measures”.

The session focused on how to create quality performance measures using a process improvement analysis.  This is an internal process that UDS affectionately refers to as a PIA. Debra Scheidt, the Executive Director of HCBS was the presenter and went on to identify how to track and trend quality measures “effectivity” and then analyze the data against an original hypothesis to determine next steps for success.  These processes have been widely established in the current UDS quality culture. The outcome has been a decrease in unplanned, preventable hospital admissions for the people they serve.

This conference was designed for the seasoned health care management professional responsible for managing, implementing and assessing the Health Plan Accreditation survey process and those professionals gathering, analyzing or reporting HEDIS data.  Several hundred professionals from as far away as Puerto Rico attended this event.

The Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) is a tool used by more than 90 percent of America’s health plans to measure performance on important dimensions of care and service. The Health Care Quality Congress offers attendees the first opportunity after the data is released to ask question, learn about the latest developments’ in Health Plan Accreditation and HEDIS measures directly from NCQA, and expand their ability to offer high-quality value-based care to their plan members.

Earlier this year, UDS was an early adopter and as such was awarded full accreditation from NCQA on behalf of Care Management For Long Term Services and Supports. UDS has presented on core measures in best practice webinars for NCQA in the past and was a presenter at the National Association of States United for Aging and Disabilities (NASUAD) conference. That was held in Baltimore, MD in August of this year. UDS took first place in the “Stories from the Field” competition.  UDS also won the video contest and the submission which illustrated the UDS Mission, was shown at the NASUAD conference.

SOURCE: news release

“Your Lifetime Health Checkup Roadmap” – The New York Times

“Many of the leading killers of Americans are chronic diseases that can be prevented with healthy habits like a good diet and plenty of exercise. But there’s a key part of prevention that should not be overlooked: At every stage of your adult life, you should undergo routine screening exams to catch any health problems so you can try to nip them in the bud. Read on for the lowdown on the routine but potentially lifesaving tests and preventive procedures that you need at every stage of your adult life.”

Read this article at The New York Times.

“Childhood poverty is linked to poorer cognitive skills in old age.” – Pacific Standard

“Cognitively speaking, there may be no way to recover from a disadvantaged childhood.”

by Tom Jacobs

“The aging of the Baby Boomers has inspired a lot of research into how we can stave off old-age cognitive decline. But a large new study suggests the most effective interventions may take place at the beginning of one’s life.

“It finds people who grew up in socially disadvantaged households—defined as crowded living quarters that are lacking in books—tend to score lower than others on tests of cognitive skills.

“This gap apparently does not increase over time, but it remains significant after taking into account such factors as education, employment, and physical health.”

Continue reading this article, click here.

Landis Communities and Friends Life Care Join to Launch Continuing Care at Home program in Lancaster and Lebanon Counties

landis

Lititz, PA – Landis Communities is pleased to announce that it has entered into an agreement with Friends Life Care to launch a Continuing Care at Home (CCaH) program in Lancaster and Lebanon counties. This arrangement will allow both organizations to expand their missions through the innovative Friends Life Care service and exceptional senior care. This new offering is a membership-based program designed to help people remain in their home as they age and can be utilized for care at home, if and when needed, and even residence-based care as those needs may evolve. The program, launching in October 2018, will therefore give older adults another option to remain living where they choose for as long as possible.

“Friends Life Care offers the first and largest continuing care at home program in the country,” explained Evon Bergey, VP of Community Initiatives at Landis Communities. “The Friends Life Care program provides a truly unique combination of care coordination and financial benefit needed to help ensure older adults have the resources and support that they will need to remain in their own homes as they age. If care is ever needed, it will be coordinated by Friends Life Care and provided by our trusted network of caregivers.”

“We are delighted to join resources with Landis Communities and bring our distinctive services to Lancaster and Lebanon Counties,” said Carol A. Barbour, president of Friends Life Care. “Friends Life Care’s philosophy is centered upon vitality, independence, growth and resilience and enables us to launch and maintain a strong partnership with Landis Communities.”

The composition of America’s aging population is changing greatly, mainly due to the very important baby boomer generation. The U.S. Census Bureau reports that 8.7 million people will be 85 or older by 2030 — the year when all baby boomers join the 65 and older population. According to research, nearly 90% of people want to stay in their own home as they age. This partnership with Friends Life Care to expand the time-tested Continuing Care at Home program provides people with more options to age in place.

Landis Communities and Friends Life Care will begin holding informational seminars in October 2018. These seminars will provide additional detailed information regarding membership in the Continuing Care at Home program. Online webinars will also be made available.


Landis Communities owns and operates Landis Homes, a Continuing Care Retirement Community/ Life Plan Community serving nearly 900 residents, in addition to a number of living options and services for seniors in the area. Friends Life Care is a not-for-profit, mission-focused Quaker-Based organization known for its expertise, integrity and product strength, all vital components for a successful partnership with Landis Communities. More information about Friends Life Care and Landis Communities and dates for seminars and webinars can be found at www.FriendsLifeCare.org/Landis or by calling 1-844-2Landis (1-844-252-6347)


Landis Communities delivers an array of services and housing options throughout the Lancaster County area. Known for enriching lives, they provide caring, high quality service to persons helping them live full lives with access to the services they need. Landis Communities began in the early 1960s when Eastern Mennonite Board of Missions and Charities (now EMM) started exploring how they might develop a community for retired mission workers, pastors and others. The organization now operates across a widening spectrum of services based on personal preferences, physical needs and financial resources. Landis Communities is a conference related ministry of LMC: A Fellowship of Anabaptist Churches and Atlantic Coast Conference of Mennonite Church USA. 

Friends Life Care offers long-term care protection by providing wellness programs, home health care, related personal care services and facility care to enrolled members in the Philadelphia and Delaware areas. Individuals and couples become members of Friends Life Care in order to protect their independence, guard their financial security and gain peace of mind. All member care is coordinated by a team of credentialed and selected professionals and provided by carefully screened aides.

 

“Before the fall: How oldsters can avoid one of old age’s most dangerous events” – The Conversation

fall“Falls are the No. 1 cause of accidental death in people 65 and older and a major cause of disability.” Photographee.eu/Shutterstock.com

“Baby boomers, who once viewed themselves as the coolest generation in history, are now turning their thoughts away from such things as partying and touring alongside rock bands to how to they can stay healthy as they age. And, one of the most important parts of healthy aging is avoiding a fall, the number one cause of accidental death among people 65 and older.

“The issue is growing more pressing each day. More adults than ever – 46 million – are 65 and older, and their numbers are increasing rapidly.

“The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that one in four older adults will fall each year. ”

Read this article in its entirety at The Conversation.

“How to Get Strong” – The New York Times

yolb-sept-strength-slide-E2CV-superJumbo-v2

by Anahad O’Connor

“Everyone knows that exercise is one of the best things you can do for your health. But most people ignore one crucial component of it: resistance training. According to federal researchers, only 6 percent of adults do the recommended minimum amount of at least two muscle-strengthening workouts each week. Neglecting resistance training – any type of workout that builds strength and muscle – is a big mistake. It increases your metabolism, lowers your body fat and protects you from some of the leading causes of early death and disability. You don’t have to lift like a bodybuilder (or look like one) to benefit from resistance training. And it’s never too late to get started. Here is everything you need to know … ”

Click here to read this New York Times article.

“Preventing Muscle Loss as We Age” – The New York Times

“Sarcopenia, a decline in skeletal muscle in older people, contributes to loss of independence.”

preventing muscle lossGracia Lam

by Jane E. Brody

“‘Use it or lose it.’ I’m sure you’re familiar with this advice. And I hope you’ve been following it. I certainly thought I was. I usually do two physical activities a day, alternating among walking, cycling and swimming. I do floor exercises for my back daily, walk up and down many stairs and tackle myriad physical tasks in and around my home.

“My young friends at the Y say I’m in great shape, and I suppose I am compared to most 77-year-old women in America today. But I’ve noticed in recent years that I’m not as strong as I used to be. Loads I once carried rather easily are now difficult, and some are impossible.

“Thanks to an admonition from a savvy physical therapist, Marilyn Moffat, a professor at New York University, I now know why. I, like many people past 50, have a condition called sarcopenia — a decline in skeletal muscle with age.”

Continue reading this New York Times article, click here.