Category Archives: Health

Penn State Health fields Community Health Needs Assessment; seeks community member input

pennstate needs assessment

Penn State Health is undertaking a Community Health Needs Assessment (CHNA) and would appreciate your assistance.

In addition to perspectives from the community partners, they want to learn about the health needs and experiences of community members. They are especially interested in hearing from underserved, low-income, racial and ethnic minorities, veterans, seniors, homeless, those struggling with chronic disease, mental health, substance use issues, or other vulnerable populations.

English: https://tinyurl.com/2021chna (or https://redcap.link/hj22fsbz)

Spanish: https://tinyurl.com/2021chna-es (or https://redcap.link/68dqzblt)

The survey is for adults age 18 years or older and will take about 10 minutes to complete. All responses are anonymous and confidential. The deadline for survey completion is April 1, 2021.

If you have any questions, or if you would like paper copies of the survey to share with your clients and program participants, please contact: Rachel Weber at CHNA@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or 717.531.3962.

“If you had to pick one healthy habit for 2021, here’s your best choice” – Canadian Broadcasting Company

walking

Numerous studies show that simply walking 30 minutes a day can have powerful health benefits

by Chad Pawson

“If you are thinking about how to get into better shape this new year, why not keep it simple with a proven health intervention that’s easy to do and proven to improve people’s health and extend their lives?

“It’s walking. And before you say “too bad it’s boring” and move on, read on a little more first.

“First of all, let’s get the benefits out of the way.

“Around 30 minutes of walking a day, whether all at one time, or in multiple sessions has been shown through studies to help people lose weight, improve their heart health, increase endurance and improve mental well-being.”

Read this article in its entirety at the CBC, click here.

“What to do if you test positive for the coronavirus this fall or winter” – WITF

Here’s how to self-isolate, what quarantine guidance means for your household, and which symptoms signal you need emergency care.

coronavirus-positive_wide-e1607108311281-1920x874

by Kristen Kendrick/NPR

“As the cooler weather takes hold, a viral pandemic is blanketing the U.S. with infection rates like we’ve never seen.

“As of early December, there are more than 200,000 new U.S. cases reported and more than 1,800 deaths from COVID-19 on average every day. And although we know this illness is dangerous, the hospitalization rate is about 243 hospital stays per 100,000 infections, which means masses of people are having to manage less severe cases at home, too.

“Patients are facing time alone with a notoriously unpredictable virus — and that can feel scary, confusing and overwhelming. Those are all sentiments I’ve heard a lot in my own practice as a family doctor lately.

“If you’ve gotten a positive test result, here’s advice from doctors about how to handle a mild to moderate, or even asymptomatic, case on your own — and when you need to seek emergency help.”

Continue reading this article at WITF, click here.


Consider, too, tuning in to this FREE interactive Q&A Webinar:

What's it like - COVID-19

When: Dec 21, 2020 09:30 AM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
Topic: My family tested positive for COVID-19!

Register in advance for this webinar:
https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_n3UmNyrsTKGAs1VWtsoN5g

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

“‘A Slow Killer’: Nursing Home Residents Wither in Isolation Forced by the Virus” – The New York Times

“Nursing homes set restrictions to lower risks, but COVID-19 has continued spreading in some homes, and residents are now grappling with consequences from isolation.”

nursing home slow killerColleen Mallory and Deanna Williams greet their 89-year-old mother, Peggy Walsh, through the window of Life Care Center in Kirkland, Wash.” Credit…Grant Hindsley for The New York Times

by Jack HealyDanielle Ivory and 

KIRKLAND, Wash. — After months of near-isolation inside his senior care facility, Charlie no longer recognizes his wife of almost 50 years. In another nursing home, Susan’s toenails grew so long that she could not squeeze into her shoes. Ida lost 37 pounds and stopped speaking. Minnie cried and asked God to just take her.

“They are among thousands of older people stricken by another epidemic ravaging America’s nursing homes — an outbreak of loneliness, depression and atrophy fueled by the very lockdowns that were imposed to protect them from the coronavirus.

“’A slow killer,’ said Esther Sarachene, who said she watched her 82-year-old mother, Ida Pasik, wither and fall mute during the months she was confined to her nursing home room in Maryland. ‘She didn’t know who I was.’

“Covid-19 continues to scythe through the halls of long-term care facilities despite an array of safety measures and bans on visitors, put in place months ago to slow the devastation.”

“Click here to read this article at The New York Times in its entirety.

Meet CATE: Mobile Response Unit – Community-Accessible Testing & Education for COVID-19

meet cate

Latino Connection, a leader in community health, is proud to announce the launch of our COVID-19 Mobile Response Unit, CATE.

“CATE exists to provide affordable and accessible COVID-19 education and testing to low income, vulnerable communities across sixteen counties in Pennsylvania to ensure equality in healthcare and the ability to stay safe, informed, and healthy.”

meet cate 2CATE will be visiting in each of the Pennsylvania Link to Aging and Disability Resources’ Service Area 13 areas.

meet cafe 3

 

The Joy of Animals – in and out of COVID-19. | REMINDER, too, register for the “Joy of Animals” Webinar on Monday, August 31.

animals“Above right, Lincoln Fuller: My wingman, Bear. Above left, Charlotte Wells of Pendleton, Ore.: Mr. Fish was rescued 8 years ago following the death of our beloved Mr. Felix (our 2nd rescue). Fish had been returned twice to the adoption agency, most likely because he behaves like a toddler, opening doors and drawers, dragging things out of the wastebasket, and biting. We’ve cured him of the biting, but the curiosity remains! If he could talk, his favorite word would be, “why?” (as in, why is the candy paper crunchy? why can’t I have my own bar of string cheese?)

These are some of the pets and pet comments that readers sent to Teresa Hanafin at the Boston Globe. Ms. Hanafin is the editor of The Boston Globe‘s newsletter, Fast Forward.

MEB: My rescue dog, Daniel, is a loving, devoted, funny, caring companion. He is the best thing that happened to me since my kids were born 51 and 48 years ago.

Alison, Eric, and Cole Zetterquist: Our endless devotion to Pikachu, our kitty who still loves us even though we named her after a big yellow mouse.

Emily Harting: Found on the sidewalk in August 2017, on a block of junkyards in Brooklyn; we’re coming up on our 3-year gotcha-versary. Lhasa/Shih-Tzu/Maltese mix (we had his DNA done but this is to point out not a big or strong dog, but a lap dog), so badly matted you could not find his face. So badly matted I didn’t know if it was male or female. I thought it was a cocker spaniel, that’s how large it was.

I wished to name him Fenway. My (sorry to say it) Yankees fan partner said absolutely not. BUT since the dog was small and clearly scrappy, that we could name him after Dustin Pedroia, hence Petey.

Love of my life. Greatest dog ever. He came with impeccable manners and so well-trained which is good b/c he had every right to be an [expletive!] and we probably would have kept him anyway.

Betsy G: Tarra (rhymes with CAR) or like the black stuff on the road! English black Lab – 12 years old. My empty nest child that still wants to come home!

Steffen W. Schmidt of Iowa: My pet dog Mad Donna got bitten by some bees, was crying and in pain. It made me nervous and freaked out. The Vet prescribed some medication. I take 4 a day and feel better.

Right now Mad Donna is chasing some chip monks by the composter. They are running away from her laughing but tripping over their Rosaries. They work for the California Highway Patrol (CHIP) as grief counselors.

Alice McCarthy: Stella, ❤️my bull terrier,❤️ makes me laugh out loud EVERY DAY! ‘Nuff said.

Karen Tarr: Our beloved cat, Hobo, passed away last summer at the age of 16. A life well-lived, but we were devastated. In June, my sister-in-law told me she knew someone who had taken a tiny, four-week-old kitten from its feral mom in an effort to control a feral colony of cats, and the kitten was in need of a home.

Little Rusty needed a lot of care in the beginning, but is now 13 weeks old and bouncing around our house like he owns the place. I’ve been working from home during COVID, but today I am back in the office for the first time since March and I am worrying about my kitten. I will still be a stay-at-home-kitten-mom most of the time! My vet said I got a “Corona Pet!”

Colleen Evans: I have 3 small dogs; 2 are rescues from Louisiana. Until last Friday, I also had 2 cats. I had to put my beautiful Coon cat Rosie to sleep. She was 18 and very frail. I also have a black former feral cat. Love all my fur babies. They keep us anchored and give unconditional love. 🐶🐯


Animals can be wonderful companions and take our minds off the stress, anxiety, trauma and uncertainty that abounds during this pandemic period of our lives. If you love animals and want to see how animals can provide soothing, calming and relaxing vibes for you — whether or not you are a pet owner, you’ll want to register for an hour and a half break pandemic to meet several Link partners as they introduce you to their special friends: animals who are making differences in the lives of so many.

joy of animals2 draft

When: Aug 31, 2020 01:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
Topic: The Joy of Animals – Return engagement

Register in advance for this webinar:
https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_AKkdy2jXRAiCk1k1J9deuw

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

“What Seniors Can Expect as Their New Normal in a Post-Vaccine World” – Kaiser Health News

senior changes

by Bruce Horowitz

“Imagine this scenario, perhaps a year or two in the future: An effective COVID-19 vaccine is routinely available and the world is moving forward. Life, however, will likely never be the same — particularly for people over 60.

That is the conclusion of geriatric medical doctors, aging experts, futurists and industry specialists. Experts say that in the aftermath of the pandemic, everything will change, from the way older folks receive health care to how they travel and shop. Also overturned: their work life and relationships with one another.

“’In the past few months, the entire world has had a near-death experience,’ said Ken Dychtwald, CEO of Age Wave, a think tank on aging around the world. ‘We’ve been forced to stop and think: I could die or someone I love could die. When those events happen, people think about what matters and what they will do differently.’

“Older adults are uniquely vulnerable because their immune systems tend to deteriorate with age, making it so much harder for them to battle not just COVID-19 but all infectious diseases. They are also more likely to suffer other health conditions, like heart and respiratory diseases, that make it tougher to fight or recover from illness. So it’s no surprise that even in the future, when a COVID-19 vaccine is widely available — and widely used — most seniors will be taking additional precautions.”

Click here to continue reading this article at Kaiser Health News.

WEBINAR | Be sure to let people you know about this special presentation on August 19; there will be morning and evening presentations.

The hazards of drugs in our communities is staggering. It’s not just about those who use drugs anymore. This presentation is a safety awareness program that is far-reaching.

The program is designed to provide the general public with current information on the Drug Crisis.  This program is not just about those illegally using drugs, but innocent parties that need to understand the dangers of accidental exposure and health hazards of prescriptions, illicit opioid drugs, methamphetamine, BHO / Marijuana and designer drugs that are a safety risk. OPIOID ADDICTION ZOOM PROGRAM August 2020

Download the above graphic as a .pdf file to share or print.

 

“‘It just weighs on your psyche’: Black Americans on mental health, trauma, and resilience” – STAT: Daily Recap

wears on youCRYSTAL MILNER/STAT

Photos and interviews by Crystal Milner

I’m feeling it, my friends and family are feeling it: the weight of this moment is immeasurable. Black Americans have been disproportionately affected by the coronavirus pandemic. This has been compounded by the tragic deaths of Black men and women — lives cut short at the hands of police and vigilantes.

“Ahmaud Arbery shot while jogging. Breonna Taylor killed in her home. George Floyd suffocated as the world watched. Rayshard Brooks asleep in a Wendy’s parking lot. Robert Fuller found hung from a tree in Palmdale, Calif. We lament the Black lives lost, past and present.

“Repeated trauma and stress have real effects on health, both physical and mental. Though the dialogue surrounding mental health is changing, it’s often considered a taboo subject in the Black community. Navigating the intersections of Black identity has always been layered and complex. With these ideas in mind, I photographed family, friends, and others in my community of Southern California and spoke with them about how being Black in the U.S. affects them, especially right now. Here are their stories and portraits.”

Click here to read this article in its entirety.

“‘More Than Physical Health’: Gym Helps 91-Year-Old Battle Isolation” – Kaiser Health News

beat social isolation“Art Ballard loads a 25-pound plate onto the leg press. ‘At my age, the best thing you can do is find a routine.'” (Heidi de Marco/KHN)

by Heidi De Marco

“MONROVIA, Calif. — Most mornings, like clockwork, you could find Art Ballard pumping iron.

“At least five days a week, he drove to Foothill Gym, where he beat on the punching bag, rode a stationary bike and worked his abs. After he joined the gym five years ago, he dropped 20 pounds, improved his balance and made friends.

“At 91, he’s still spry and doesn’t take any medication other than an occasional Tylenol for aches and pains.

“’Doctors love me,’ he said.

“But when California enacted a statewide stay-at-home order in mid-March, his near-daily physical exercise and social interactions abruptly ended.”

Keep reading this inspiring article, click here.