Category Archives: Food & nutrition

“New Diet Slows the Brain’s Aging” – Senior Planet

MIND-diet-blueberries1

“What you eat may do more than reduce your risk of getting Alzheimer’s disease. New research suggests that your diet could also slow your brain’s aging and keep you sharper as you get older.

“The idea that what you eat can influence cognitive health isn’t new – brain experts have been touting the brain benefits of the same diet that’s recommended for the heart for a while – but the newly designed MIND diet may work even better.

“Developed at Rush University Medical Center by Martha Clare Morris, PhD, an epidemiologist there, the MIND diet combines the best of the Mediterranean and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets. Both of these have long been recommended to slash the risks of high blood pressure, heart attack and stroke, and the research suggests that the new hybrid may go a long way guard brain health, as well.

“Study participants who closely followed the MIND diet – all residents of retirement communities and senior public housing units in the Chicago area – showed much less mental decline over the years than those who didn’t.”

“What’s the MIND diet?”

Continue reading this article at Senior Planet, click here.

 

“Bogus Health News Is All Over Pinterest” – Buzz Feed News

“Pins making unsubstantiated claims — like that cinnamon cures arthritis and alkaline water kills cancer — have been pinned thousands of times.”

bogus health

Pinterest is where many people turn for ideas about how to be healthy. But the recipes, nutrition advice, and other colorful infographics that the site is so well-known for are rife with bad information about health and science.

“This kind of misinformation is baseless and ineffective at best, and harmful at worst — some pins, for example, make unsubstantiated claims about preventing and treating cancer — but Pinterest says that it is only a minor problem for the site.

“With little effort over the past month, BuzzFeed News found more than a dozen misleading health-related pins that were being shared widely.

“One pin, saved to about 13,000 boards, falsely claimed: ‘Even Doctors Can Not Explain This: Boiled Cinnamon And Honey Is The Cure For Many Health Problems,’ from cancer to arthritis to gallbladder infections. Another pin with a bogus claim — ‘Retired Pharmacy Chief Said: “The World Needs To Know, Alkaline Water Kills Cancer”‘ — was saved to more than 16,500 boards.”

Read this BuzzFeedNews article in its entirety, click here.

“Cancer Linked to Obesity” – Time Goes By: What it’s really like to get old

cancer weight

Read this column here.

It’s not only in this state | “Many of state’s elderly residents struggle to pay their bills” – The Boston Globe

by Katie Johnson

“Judi Gorsuch has a degree in literature from Michigan State University. She worked as a flight attendant for 19 years, earning up to $40,000 a year, and spent a decade at the Boston Public Library in Copley Square, making $12 an hour before her part-time position was cut.

“Now Gorsuch, 74, lives in public housing near the Prudential Center and relies on her monthly $1,460 Social Security check and $400-a-month pension. Between rent and groceries and medical costs, Gorsuch says she’s lucky if she has any money left at the end of the month. When a new prescription for a bladder condition upped her expenses by $55 a month, she stopped filling it.

“‘I just decided to use Depends,’ she said.”

“Gorsuch, who never married and has no children, is among nearly 300,000 Massachusetts residents age 65 and above whose incomes aren’t enough to cover basic necessities, according to the 2016 Elder Economic Security Standard Index developed at the University of Massachusetts Boston.

living below the line

“New estimates from the 2016 Elder Economic Security Standard Index™ suggest that half of older adults living alone, and one out of four older adults living in two-elder households, lack the financial resources required to pay for basic needs.”

elder economic security standard

Click here to read The Boston Globe article in its entirety.

 

New Innovations in Nutrition Programs and Services Grant Opportunity to Promote the Quality and Effectiveness of Nutrition Service Programs

The Administration on Aging (AoA), part of the Administration for Community Living (ACL), announces a new grant opportunity to increase the evidenced based knowledge base of nutrition providers, drive improved health outcomes for program recipients by promoting higher service quality, and increase program efficiency through innovative nutrition service delivery models.

This funding opportunity is to support innovative and promising practices that move the aging network towards evidenced based practices that enhance the quality, effectiveness of nutrition services programs or outcomes within the aging services network. Innovation can include service products that appeal to caregivers (such as web-based ordering systems and carryout food products), increased involvement of volunteers (such as retired chefs), consideration of eating habits and choice (such as variable meal times, salad bars, or more fresh fruits and vegetables), new service models (testing variations and hybrid strategies) and other innovations to better serve a generation of consumers whose needs and preferences are different.

Please visit the link here for more details about the grant opportunity and application process. This grant opportunity closes on August 7, 2017.

“Fresh Food By Prescription: This Health Care Firm Is Trimming Costs — And Waistlines” – NPR

by Allison Aubrey

trimming waistlinesRegistered dietitian Anna Ziegler counsels Tom Shicowich, who has a Type 2 diabetes. Since enrolling in the Fresh Food Pharmacy program, Shicowich has lost about 45 pounds. His A1C level has dropped significantly. – Allison Aubrey/NPR

“The advice to eat a healthy diet is not new. Back around 400 B.C., Hippocrates, the Greek doctor, had this missive: Let food be thy medicine.

“But as a society, we’ve got a long way to go. About one out of every two deaths from heart disease, stroke and Type 2 diabetes in the U.S. is linked to a poor diet. That’s about 1,000 deaths a day.

“There are lots of places to lay the blame. Calories are cheap, and indulgent foods full of salt, sugar and fat are usually within our reach 24/7.

“So, how best to turn this around? Consider Tom Shicowich’s story. It begins with a toe. His left pinky toe.”

Continue reading this NPR article, click here.

Meals On Wheels Wants To Be The ‘Eyes and Ears’ For Hospitals, Doctors” – CNN

mealsDebbie Case, CEO of the Meals on Wheels San Diego County, delivers lunch and dinner to 75-year-old David Kelly. Kelly lost his sight about two years ago and reluctantly gave up cooking. – Photo: Meals on Wheels lifeline

by Anna Gorman, Kaiser Health News

“Debbie Case held an insulated bag with two packaged meals — a sandwich wrap and fruit for lunch, a burrito and cauliflower for dinner.

“You’re going to eat well today,” Case told 75-year-old Dave Kelly as she handed him the meals. Kelly lost his sight about two years ago and reluctantly gave up cooking.

“After putting the food away, Kelly chatted with Case about his experience as a folk musician. As they talked in his living room, Case, CEO of San Diego County’s Meals on Wheels program, glanced around for hazards that could cause Kelly to fall.

“Kelly said the homemade meals keep him from eating too much frozen food or take-out. But more than that, he said he appreciates someone coming by to check on him every day.

“‘Anything could happen,’ Kelly said, adding that he worries about falling. ‘I wouldn’t want to lay around and suffer for days.’

“Meals on Wheels is undergoing a dramatic overhaul as government and philanthropic funding fails to keep pace with a rapidly growing elderly population. The increased demand has resulted in lengthy waitlists and a need to find other sources of funding. And at the same time, for-profit companies such as Mom’s Meals are creating more competition.”

Continue reading this article in its entirety at CNN, click here.

Health literacy continued | talking about health issues is a good thing

Two articles from justcareusa.org make a lot of sense for everyone.

literacy-1

“Many of us want to help our parents or other people we love as they age. But, we have no idea how to help. For sure, engaging them in conversation is already a big help. If you want to talk to your loved ones about their health, here are five tips for beginning the conversation.”

literacy-2

How to lower your blood pressure: DASH | The Centers for Disease Control offers advice on how to lower your blood pressure to avoid hypertension. DASH, the dietary approach to stop hypertension (high blood pressure), is an eating program that’s easy to implement. The goal is to consume no more than 1,500 milligrams of sodium a day.”

 

Friday Wrap-Up, September 23, 2016 | a message from the Secretary of Aging

friday wrap-up 03-11-16

Each week the Office of the Secretary of Pennsylvania’s Department of Aging releases a Friday newsletter with information relevant to activities, issues and events for older Pennsylvanians and persons with disabilities across the Commonwealth.Click here to read the September 23  newsletter.

Highlighted in this newsletter are:

  • The National Foundation to End Senior Hunger has launched What A Waste University (WAWU). WAWU is a center for learning – dedicated to education about Nutrition, Waste and Sustainability
  • Information about a Human Diversity and Cultural Competency Online Course.
  • Events – PA Link to Aging and Disability Resources.

“Misconceptions on aging and health” – World Health Organization

MISCONCEPTIONS

At the Cultural Diversity Workshops held at Lebanon Valley College today, the closing keynote featured Dr.Ayesha S. Ahmad, M.D., F.A.C.P.  who presented this Keynote Topic: The Greying of America. Dr. Ahmad touched on several of the emerging trends below in her comments today.

The World Health Organization states,Most developed world countries have accepted the chronological age of 65 years as a definition of ‘elderly’ or older person, but like many westernized concepts, this does not adapt well to the situation in Africa. While this definition is somewhat arbitrary, it is many times associated with the age at which one can begin to receive pension benefits. At the moment, there is no United Nations standard numerical criterion, but the UN agreed cutoff is 60+ years to refer to the older population.

“Although there are commonly used definitions of old age, there is no general agreement on the age at which a person becomes old. The common use of a calendar age to mark the threshold of old age assumes equivalence with biological age, yet at the same time, it is generally accepted that these two are not necessarily synonymous.”

Misconceptions of aging and health: Some of the most important barriers to developing good public policy on ageing are pervasive misconceptions, negative attitudes and assumptions about older people. Although there is substantial evidence about the many contributions that older people make to their societies, they are frequently stereotyped as dependent, frail, out of touch, or a burden. These ageist attitudes limit older people’s freedom to live the lives they choose and our capacity to capitalise on the great human capacity that older people represent.

Click here to see 10 Misconceptions of aging and health, globally.