Category Archives: Food & nutrition

“For those who receive — and deliver — Meals on Wheels, more than nutrition is on the menu” – The Boston Globe

meals on wheelsJessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff – Vito LaMura makes a Meals on Wheels delivery to Sally Neale in Lexington.

LEXINGTON — It’s a Tuesday ritual that Vito LaMura holds dear.

“On that day, the 71-year-old retired teacher drives from his Bedford home to Lexington Community Center, where he picks up more than a dozen Meals on Wheels packages. LaMura carefully lays out the bagged containers in his Mazda hatchback. Then he’s off on an 8-mile route — delivering food to housebound seniors who get by on Social Security, daily routines, and memories.

“The modest meals are crucial for those who receive them. So is the emotional nourishment. The state and federally funded Meals on Wheels program provides a daily visit for about 75,000 people over age 60 in Massachusetts. Many are hungry, isolated, and living in or near poverty. It’s a human connection to an outside world that can recede from view in later years. Many Meals on Wheels volunteers are retirees like LaMura. Some aren’t that much younger than the folks they visit. But most of them are focused on navigating their routes rather than peering into what could be their future. As he makes his rounds, it’s clear the program benefits LaMura as much as it does the recipients, whom he calls ‘my people.’ Their conversations come easily.”

Click here to continue reading this Boston Globe article.

BERKS COUNTY MEALS ON WHEELS INFORMATION

LANCASTER COUNTY MEALS ON WHEELS INFORMATION

LEBANON COUNTY MEALS ON WHEELS INFORMATION

 

 

“Older Americans Are ‘Hooked’ on Vitamins” – The New York Times

vitaminsTony Cenicola/The New York Times

by

“When she was a young physician, Dr. Martha Gulati noticed that many of her mentors were prescribing vitamin E and folic acid to patients. Preliminary studies in the early 1990s had linked both supplements to a lower risk of heart disease.

“She urged her father to pop the pills as well: ‘Dad, you should be on these vitamins, because every cardiologist is taking them or putting their patients on [them],’ recalled Dr. Gulati, now chief of cardiology for the University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix.

“But just a few years later, she found herself reversing course, after rigorous clinical trials found neither vitamin E nor folic acid supplements did anything to protect the heart.”

Read this article at The New York Times, click here.

Friday Wrap-Up, March 9, 2018 | a message from the Secretary of Aging

Each week the Office of the Secretary of Pennsylvania’s Department of Aging releases a Friday newsletter with information relevant to activities, issues and events for older Pennsylvanians and persons with disabilities across the Commonwealth. Click here download the newsletter as a .pdf file.

New Brief and Interactive Map Examine Poverty Among Seniors in the U.S. – Kaiser Family Foundation

A new Kaiser Family Foundation brief and interactive map provide the latest national and state-level estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau of the share of people ages 65 and older who are living in poverty. In 2016, 9.3 percent of seniors, or 4.6 million people, lived in poverty, based on the official poverty threshold of $11,511 in income for an individual age 65 or older. That year 30.4 percent, or 15 million seniors, had income under twice the poverty threshold. Under an alternative measure of poverty, known as the Supplemental Poverty Measure, the analysis shows a larger share and number of seniors living below poverty thresholds. That measure, developed in response to concerns that the official measure does not accurately reflect people’s financial resources or liabilities, takes into account out-of-pocket health care costs, regional variation in housing costs and other factors.

Under the Supplemental Poverty Measure, 14.5 percent of people ages 65 and older, or 7.1 million, were living in poverty in 2016—2.5 million more seniors in poverty than under the official measure. And under this measure, 42.4 percent, or 20.9 million people, had incomes below twice the poverty level—5.9 million more seniors than under the official poverty measure.

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SOURCE: Kaiser Family Foundation

“Go Further with Food” | March is National Nutrition Month

national nutrition month

 

National Nutrition Month® is a nutrition education and information campaign created annually in March by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The campaign focuses on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits.

Go Further with Foodis the theme for 2018, and its importance is appropriate for many reasons. The foods you choose throughout your day do make a difference for you and your family. Preparing foods to go further at home and within the community can have a positive impact, as well. As nutrition experts, Academy members (dietitians) can help people adopt healthier eating styles, while reducing food loss and waste. 

The Key Messages of 2018 include:

  1. Include a variety of healthful foods from all of the food groups on a regular basis.
  2. Consider the foods you have on hand before buying more at the store.
  3. Buy only the amount that can be eaten or frozen within a few days and plan ways to use leftovers later in the week.
  4. Be mindful of portion sizes. Eat and drink the amount that’s right for you, as MyPlate encourages us to do.
  5. Continue to use good food safety practices.
  6. Find activities that you enjoy and be physically active most days of the week.
  7. Realize the benefits of healthy eating by consulting with a registered dietitian nutritionist. RDNs can provide sound, easy-to-follow personalized nutrition advice to meet your lifestyle, preferences and health-related needs.

Throughout March, Purfoods Registered Dietitians @ Mom’s Meals NourishCare will provide daily nutrition and health tips that will encourage you to “Go Further with Food”.  Stay tuned for activities that will increase your food and nutrition knowledge, offer opportunities to stretch your food dollar and maybe provide some tasty samples and recipes from the Chefs in R&D.  Let’s Go Further with Food!

SOURCE: submitted

“New Diet Slows the Brain’s Aging” – Senior Planet

MIND-diet-blueberries1

“What you eat may do more than reduce your risk of getting Alzheimer’s disease. New research suggests that your diet could also slow your brain’s aging and keep you sharper as you get older.

“The idea that what you eat can influence cognitive health isn’t new – brain experts have been touting the brain benefits of the same diet that’s recommended for the heart for a while – but the newly designed MIND diet may work even better.

“Developed at Rush University Medical Center by Martha Clare Morris, PhD, an epidemiologist there, the MIND diet combines the best of the Mediterranean and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets. Both of these have long been recommended to slash the risks of high blood pressure, heart attack and stroke, and the research suggests that the new hybrid may go a long way guard brain health, as well.

“Study participants who closely followed the MIND diet – all residents of retirement communities and senior public housing units in the Chicago area – showed much less mental decline over the years than those who didn’t.”

“What’s the MIND diet?”

Continue reading this article at Senior Planet, click here.

 

“Bogus Health News Is All Over Pinterest” – Buzz Feed News

“Pins making unsubstantiated claims — like that cinnamon cures arthritis and alkaline water kills cancer — have been pinned thousands of times.”

bogus health

Pinterest is where many people turn for ideas about how to be healthy. But the recipes, nutrition advice, and other colorful infographics that the site is so well-known for are rife with bad information about health and science.

“This kind of misinformation is baseless and ineffective at best, and harmful at worst — some pins, for example, make unsubstantiated claims about preventing and treating cancer — but Pinterest says that it is only a minor problem for the site.

“With little effort over the past month, BuzzFeed News found more than a dozen misleading health-related pins that were being shared widely.

“One pin, saved to about 13,000 boards, falsely claimed: ‘Even Doctors Can Not Explain This: Boiled Cinnamon And Honey Is The Cure For Many Health Problems,’ from cancer to arthritis to gallbladder infections. Another pin with a bogus claim — ‘Retired Pharmacy Chief Said: “The World Needs To Know, Alkaline Water Kills Cancer”‘ — was saved to more than 16,500 boards.”

Read this BuzzFeedNews article in its entirety, click here.

“Cancer Linked to Obesity” – Time Goes By: What it’s really like to get old

cancer weight

Read this column here.

It’s not only in this state | “Many of state’s elderly residents struggle to pay their bills” – The Boston Globe

by Katie Johnson

“Judi Gorsuch has a degree in literature from Michigan State University. She worked as a flight attendant for 19 years, earning up to $40,000 a year, and spent a decade at the Boston Public Library in Copley Square, making $12 an hour before her part-time position was cut.

“Now Gorsuch, 74, lives in public housing near the Prudential Center and relies on her monthly $1,460 Social Security check and $400-a-month pension. Between rent and groceries and medical costs, Gorsuch says she’s lucky if she has any money left at the end of the month. When a new prescription for a bladder condition upped her expenses by $55 a month, she stopped filling it.

“‘I just decided to use Depends,’ she said.”

“Gorsuch, who never married and has no children, is among nearly 300,000 Massachusetts residents age 65 and above whose incomes aren’t enough to cover basic necessities, according to the 2016 Elder Economic Security Standard Index developed at the University of Massachusetts Boston.

living below the line

“New estimates from the 2016 Elder Economic Security Standard Index™ suggest that half of older adults living alone, and one out of four older adults living in two-elder households, lack the financial resources required to pay for basic needs.”

elder economic security standard

Click here to read The Boston Globe article in its entirety.

 

New Innovations in Nutrition Programs and Services Grant Opportunity to Promote the Quality and Effectiveness of Nutrition Service Programs

The Administration on Aging (AoA), part of the Administration for Community Living (ACL), announces a new grant opportunity to increase the evidenced based knowledge base of nutrition providers, drive improved health outcomes for program recipients by promoting higher service quality, and increase program efficiency through innovative nutrition service delivery models.

This funding opportunity is to support innovative and promising practices that move the aging network towards evidenced based practices that enhance the quality, effectiveness of nutrition services programs or outcomes within the aging services network. Innovation can include service products that appeal to caregivers (such as web-based ordering systems and carryout food products), increased involvement of volunteers (such as retired chefs), consideration of eating habits and choice (such as variable meal times, salad bars, or more fresh fruits and vegetables), new service models (testing variations and hybrid strategies) and other innovations to better serve a generation of consumers whose needs and preferences are different.

Please visit the link here for more details about the grant opportunity and application process. This grant opportunity closes on August 7, 2017.