Category Archives: Uncategorized

Friday Wrap-Up, September 22, 2017 | a message from the Secretary of Aging

 

Each week week the Office of the Secretary of Pennsylvania’s Department of Aging releases a Friday newsletter with information relevant to activities, issues and events for older Pennsylvanians and persons with disabilities across the Commonwealth. Click here to download the newsletter as a .pdf file.

Improve the care you give and learn more about the people you serve by taking free video training courses. Click here to access free training videos at the Pennsylvania Home Care Association Website.

 

“And chemo begins” – Time Goes By: What it’s really like to get old.

pancreatic

We’ve been following website author, Ronnie Bennett, writings for a long time – her observations on life, music and now her experiences with pancreatic cancer are so well written. We’ve laughed, been brought to tears and reveled by reading her words and listening to the bunches of sound tracks she’s shared.

This column, now, shares her thoughts on her first chemotherapy session.

Friday Wrap-Up, September 8, 2017 | a message from the Secretary of Aging

Each week week the Office of the Secretary of Pennsylvania’s Department of Aging releases a Friday newsletter with information relevant to activities, issues and events for older Pennsylvanians and persons with disabilities across the Commonwealth.

Click here to download the newsletter as a .pdf file.

On National Grandparents Day 2017: Sept. 10, Grandparents still work to support grandchildren

grandparents work

In 1970, Marian McQuade initiated a campaign to establish a day to honor grandparents. In 1978, President Jimmy Carter signed a federal proclamation, declaring the first Sunday after Labor Day as National Grandparents Day. To honor our nation’s grandparents, the U.S. Census Bureau presents statistics about their role in American society as caregivers of their grandchildren.

Grandparents as Caregivers

7.3 million – The number of grandparents whose grandchildren under age 18 were living with them in 2015.

2.6 million – The number of grandparents responsible for the basic needs of one or more grandchild under age 18 living with them in 2015. Of these caregivers, 1.6 million were grandmothers and 1.0 million were grandfathers.

509,922 – The number of grandparents responsible for grandchildren under age 18 whose income was below the poverty level in the past 12 months, compared with the 2.1 million grandparent caregivers whose income was at or above the poverty level.

$51,448 – The median income for families with grandparent householders responsible for grandchildren under age 18. Among these families, where a parent of the grandchildren was not present, the median income was $37,580.

642,852 – The number of grandparents who had a disability and were responsible for their grandchildren.

Friday Wrap-Up, September 1, 2017 | a message from the Secretary of Aging

Each week week the Office of the Secretary of Pennsylvania’s Department of Aging releases a Friday newsletter with information relevant to activities, issues and events for older Pennsylvanians and persons with disabilities across the Commonwealth.

Click here to download the newsletter as a .pdf file.

All three county partners’ network’s cross-training meetings for September are included in this week’s newsletter.

“Self-reliant older baby boomers are now better-connected to goods, services and care” – American Society on Aging

self reliant senior

by Stephen W. Golant

“It is fair to surmise that the 100,000 young people in their late teens and twenties who converged in San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury neighborhood to participate in the 1967 Summer of Love were not especially tuned in to how their grandparents were coping with getting old. It is even less likely that these young baby boomers thought much about their own old age. This socially rebellious group, which rejected middle-class values and parental controls, and who romanticized communal living, could hardly imagine that in their old age they would end up living in cul-de-sac suburbs and traveling in their cars to regional malls to buy furnishings for their single-family detached dwellings.

“With their anti-government sentiments, they could hardly have foreseen how important Social Security and Medicare would become for their future health and financial well-being. Yet perhaps they were well-advised not to look to their grandparents as exemplars on how to live in old age. If they had been aware in the late 1960s of the challenges of dealing with old age, they may well have carried signs calling for ‘no more nursing homes for the old.’

“Fast forward five decades, and these now aging baby boomers are still showing their independent spirits. They are opting to age in place for as long as possible, even as these residential decisions clash with the opinions of many experts who argue that the baby boomers’ current dwellings are designed for the young and are unequipped to accommodate those individuals who suffer from physical and activity limitations, chronic health problems, and social losses.”

Continue reading this article in its entirety here.

“This will never happen here.”

By now you’ve seen this image from the flooding in Texas.

nursing homeThe Galveston County Daily News article is here: “18 people rescued from flooded assisted living facility.”

You’ve also heard the phrase: Prepare for those events that are “never gonna’ happen.”

Flooding can happen along any body of water. “Flooding is the most frequent and damaging natural disaster that occurs throughout the Commonwealth. Many of Pennsylvania’s communities are located along waterways,” according to Pennsylvania’s Hazard Vulnerability Analysis.

Hurricanes, tornadoes and flooding can happen almost anywhere – but especially along the southern coasts of the country.

Several months ago, we posted this article here: “Nursing homes and hospice providers face looming emergency preparedness deadline” – Modern Healthcare

“The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued the Emergency Preparedness Requirements for Medicare and Medicaid Participating Providers and Suppliers Final Rule to establish consistent emergency preparedness requirements for healthcare providers participating in Medicare and Medicaid, increase patient safety during emergencies, and establish a more coordinated response to natural and human-caused disasters.

“This rule applies to 17 provider and supplier types as a condition of participation for CMS. The providers/suppliers are required to meet four core elements (with specific requirements adjusted based on the individual characteristics of each provider and supplier):

  1. Emergency plan — Develop an emergency plan based on a risk assessment and using an “all-hazards” approach, which will provide an integrated system for emergency planning that focuses on capacities and capabilities.
  2. Policies and procedures — Develop and implement policies and procedures based on the emergency plan and risk assessment that are reviewed and updated at least annually. For hospitals, Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs), and Long-Term Care (LTC) facilities, the policies and procedures must address the provision of subsistence needs, such as food, water and medical supplies, for staff and residents, whether they evacuate or shelter in place.
  3. Communication plan — Develop and maintain an emergency preparedness communication plan that complies with federal, state and local laws. Patient care must be coordinated within the facility, across healthcare providers, and with state and local public health departments and emergency management systems to protect patient health and safety in the event of a disaster.
  4. A training and testing program — Develop and maintain training and testing programs, including initial training in policies and procedures. Facility staff will have to demonstrate knowledge of emergency procedures and provide training at least annually. Facilities must conduct drills and exercises to test the emergency plan or participate in an actual incident that tests the plan.”

Click here to read the complete document: “CMS Emergency Preparedness Rule: Resources at Your Fingertips.”

Want more information about developing emergency preparedness planning postures for your facility or individual preparedness planning for persons you work with? Contact  the Link coordinator. Call / text 717.380.9714 or email blllink@mail.com.

Pennsylvania Link to Aging and Disability Resources Service Area 13 welcomes four new partner resources providers

WELCOME NEW PARTNERS

Four more resources providers have aligned with the Pennsylvania Link to Aging and Disability Resources | Berks-Lancaster-Lebanon Service Area in the past 30 days.

The new partner entities are:

To align with the Berks-Lancaster-Lebanon Service Area as a partner entity costs nothing. The Pennsylvania Link to Aging and Disability Resources part of the national Aging and Disability Resources Center [ADRC) network.

For more information about how your agency, entity or organization can become a partner, text or call the Lead Link coordinator at 717.380.9714 or email blllink@mail.com.

Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRCs) are the first place to go to get accurate, unbiased information on all aspects of life related to aging or living with a disability.

Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRC) are a nationwide effort to take a seamless approach in the way we assist seniors and adults with disabilities who need help with activities of daily living. The ADRC in Pennsylvania is known as the Link.

HOW CAN THE LINK ASSIST YOU AND/OR YOUR FAMILY?

  • Easily connect you to local services/supports through any Link partner agency
  • Explore existing options to ensure a secure plan for independence
  • Assist consumers with applications to determine funding eligibility
  • Help consumers remain or return to their community because of a disability, an illness or accident, or to transition from an institution back to the community
There is no charge for information and assistance provided by any Link or Link partner agency.

PA LINK TO AGING AND DISABILITY RESOURCE CENTER TOLL FREE HElpLINE: 1-800-753-8827

Friday Wrap-Up, August 25, 2017 | a message from the Secretary of Aging

Each week week the Office of the Secretary of Pennsylvania’s Department of Aging releases a Friday newsletter with information relevant to activities, issues and events for older Pennsylvanians and persons with disabilities across the Commonwealth.

Click here to download the newsletter as a .pdf file.

 

“New Series of Maps: Disability in America”

“The Research and Training Center on Disability in Rural Communities (RTC: Rural) has produced a new series of maps from their research called “Disability in America”.

These maps are based on demographic data collected through the American Community Survey and cover a variety of topics including disability rates, rates of particular types of disabilities, and other indicators for people with disabilities such as poverty and employment.

disability mapsOne of the maps available here: http://rtc.ruralinstitute.umt.edu/research-findings/geography/maps/.

SOURCE: The National Association of States United for Aging and Disabilities (NASUAD) Friday Updates