Category Archives: Uncategorized

What’s behind the “OK, Boomer” surge

“A word to the youngs: The shiny tools of modernity will always fall prey to the ancient flaws of humanity.” – extracted from this New York Times opinion piece about US Representative Katie Hill’s resignation statement during which she stated:

“The forces of revenge by a bitter jealous man, cyber exploitation and sexual shaming that target our gender and a large segment of society that fears and hates powerful women have combined to push a young woman out of power and say that she doesn’t belong here.”

ok boomer

It’s somewhat scary that this intergenerational conflict was a central theme in the 2011 novel by Albert Brooks.

This New York Times article (‘OK Boomer’ Marks the End of Friendly Generational Relations – Now it’s war: Gen Z has finally snapped over climate change and financial inequality.)


Ok Boomer: Cool or Not Cool?

“Ok Boomer” merch sent us through a range of emotions from indignation and outrage to wanting to reach out. Ultimately we asked: Is it worth the fight? – Weareagisy.com

“Adding a Dental Benefit to Medicare: Addressing Racial Disparities”

“This brief describes the racial disparities in access to oral health and oral health outcomes. Coverage is a key factor in reducing the existing disparities. This brief proposes adding oral health as a Medicare benefit as a potential solution. It also proposes additional policy options aimed at reducing disparities beyond expanding oral health coverage,”

dental care

Click on the graphic to read the report as a .pdf file.

“Elusive Zzzzzzzs: Setting back clock won’t erase sleep deficit nagging older adults” – The Boston Globe

ADULT SLEEPDr. Sanford Auerbach, director of sleep disorders at Boston Medical Center, checked on the fit of a CPAP mask.” JOHN TLUMACKI / GLOBE STAFF/GLOBE STAFF

by Robert Weisman

“Will you enjoy an extra hour of sleep when daylight saving time ends Sunday?

“Many sleep-deprived seniors, after dutifully setting back their clocks Saturday night, will mark the occasion doing what they’re often doing in the wee hours: tossing and turning, nudging snoring spouses, and fretting about being awake.

“It’s a cruel irony for older adults. At a time of life when they should be able to relax, after decades of raising children and trudging to work, falling and staying asleep are more challenging than ever. Chalk it up to rising anxiety, changing circadian rhythms, and unhealthy habits, ranging from late-day caffeine and alcohol intake to nonstop digital interruptions.”

Continue reading this article in its entirety at The Boston Globe, click here.

CABHC announces Peer Support Specialist Training Scholarship

cabhc peer support.jpg

Capital Area Behavioral Health Collaborative (CABHC) is reintroducing a Peer Support scholarship initiative.  CABHC will cover the cost to enroll in the Peer Support training class and have secured slots at each training session in Lebanon, PA.  Qualified individuals who are interested in applying to receive a scholarship to attend the 10-day Peer Support training class in Lebanon, PA, should visit www.cabhc.org.  Please see attached flyer for more information.  Thank you.

“Medicare Shopping Season Is Almost Here” – The New York Times

“Every fall, the 60 million Americans who use the health plan can compare options and save money. Here’s what to consider.”

medicare

Credit: Corey Brickley

by Mark Miller

“If you’re enrolled in Medicare but worry about the cost of health care, your chance to do something about it is right around the corner.

“Most people enroll in Medicare when they become eligible at age 65. But every fall, they have the opportunity to change their coverage during an enrollment season that runs from Oct. 15 through Dec. 7. This is the time of year when you can switch between original fee-for-service Medicare and Medicare Advantage, the all-in-one managed care alternative to the traditional program. You also can re-evaluate your prescription drug coverage — whether that is a stand-alone Part D plan, or wrapped into an Advantage plan.

“It’s a good idea to do a checkup on your coverage, even if you are happy with your current choices.”

Keep reading this article at the New York Times, click here.


Free, Objective, Expert Medicare Counseling

The APPRISE program offers free Medicare counseling to older Pennsylvanians.  APPRISE counselors are specially trained to answer your questions and provide you with objective, easy-to-understand information about Medicare, Medicare Supplemental Insurance, Medicaid, and Long-Term Care Insurance.”

Each county’s Area Agency on Aging has APPRISE counselors to help you understand the options and opportunities.

Department of Aging warns seniors of genetic testing scam

pa aging logo

Harrisburg, PA – The Department of Aging is warning Pennsylvania seniors, their families, and caregivers about a new scam targeting older adults. DNA testing has become extremely popular in the past few years for people looking to learn more about their family history and health, and scammers are now targeting Medicare beneficiaries with a fraudulent DNA testing service. These scammers offer “free” genetic testing, claiming it is covered through Medicare, as a means for the senior to avoid disease or to find the right medications. This is simply an effort to gain access to a senior’s personal Medicare information, which can lead to access to financial information and more.

“Unfortunately, scammers continue to develop ways to target seniors,” said Secretary of Aging Robert Torres. “It’s a major priority to circulate new scam tactics to the public as we discover them to help older adults and their loved ones be one step ahead of potentially being a victim of these criminals.”

The Administration for Community Living (ACL) suggests the following tips to avoid being scammed:

  • Do not accept genetic testing services, including a cheek swab, from someone at a community event, a local fair, a farmer’s market, a parking lot, or any other large event.
  • Always be cautious about giving out your personal information, including your Medicare number.
  • If you receive a genetic testing kit in the mail, don’t accept it unless it was ordered by your physician. Refuse the delivery or return it to the sender and keep a record of the sender’s name and the date you returned the items.
  • Always review your Medicare Summary Notice or Explanation of Benefits. The words “gene analysis” or “molecular pathology” may indicate questionable genetic testing.

The U.S. Department of Justice estimates that one in 10 older adults is a victim of elder abuse, and according to the Senate Special Committee on Aging, for every case of elder abuse reported, five go unreported. This reporting rate is even more troubling in financial abuse cases, which estimates that only one in 14 cases is reported.

If you or a loved one have already received a genetic testing cheek swab or screening that was not ordered by a trusted provider, or have any concerns about possible fraud, find and contact your local Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP) here or call 1-877-808-2468.

Anyone can report elder abuse by calling the 24-hour statewide elder abuse hotline at 1-800-490-8505, or by contacting their local Area Agency on Aging. Pennsylvania law protects those who report suspected abuse from retaliation and civil or criminal liability; all calls are free and confidential.

SOURCE: news release

 

PADDC Issues Request for Application | Housing & Services: Advocacy & Education

A funding opportunity that’s important to consider!

PADDC grant applications

The Pennsylvania Developmental Disabilities Council has released its Fall 2019 Request for Application (RFA) book. One project is available for Housing Services: Advocacy & Education..

The Council invites interested groups and organizations to review our RFA and requirements, and to attend the pre application conference to ask questions and learn more.

Download the RFA Book, additional forms, and access more information through this link: http://www.paddc.org/grant-funding-opportunities/rfp-book/.

To request a printed copy of the book, please contact PADDC at 717-787-6057.


Use the links below to download the Fall 2019 Request for Applications materials (September 2019)

What’s important about the year 2030

“Demographers, gerontologists and government officials are counting down to 2030. That’s the year America’s youngest baby boomers will reach retirement age.”

There are some interesting reading about the ever-growing aging populations. Here are some:

aging-forum-

Even though this article is about California, Pennsylvania’s aging population mirrors the demographics in the “golden state.”

“How Should California Address The Needs Of Its Aging Population?”

“Age 65+ Adults Are Projected to Outnumber Children by 2030” 

Penn State Data Center Report: “By our projections, there will be 38 elderly dependent persons for every 100 working age persons in Pennsylvania by 2030.”

Michael Behney is one of the authors of this study: “Pennsylvania Population Projections — 2010-2040”

 

“Want To Reduce Suicides? Follow The Data — To Medical Offices, Motels And Even Animal Shelters” -California Healthline

suicide note in latin“On the wall of Washington County epidemiologist Kimberly Repp’s office is a sign in Latin: Hic locus est ubi mors gaudet succurrere vitae. This is a place where the dead delight in helping the living.” (Adam Wickham for KHN)

by Maureen O’Hagan

“On Kimberly Repp’s office wall is a sign in Latin: Hic locus est ubi mors gaudet succurrere vitae. This is a place where the dead delight in helping the living.

“For medical examiners, it’s a mission. Their job is to investigate deaths and learn from them, for the benefit of us all. Repp, however, isn’t a medical examiner; she’s a Ph.D. microbiologist. And as the epidemiologist for Washington County in Oregon, she was accustomed to studying infectious diseases like flu or norovirus outbreaks among the living.

“But in 2012 she was asked by county officials to look at suicide. The request led her into the world of death investigations, and it also appears to have led to something remarkable: In this suburban county of 600,000 just west of Portland, the suicide rate now is going down. It’s remarkable, because national suicide rates have risen despite decades-long efforts to reverse the deadly trend.”

Continue reading this article at California Healthline.

 

“‘Please know you’re not alone’: For dementia caregivers, a place to share with strangers — and be honest” – STAT

dementiaHyacinth Empinado/STAT

“Barbara Metcalf and Mary Smallwood live 826 miles apart. They’ve never met in person. If not for a chance interaction on Facebook, they would have stayed strangers. But for months, the two women talked nearly every day, swapping stories and venting about their husbands, who both have dementia.

“Their husbands’ symptoms have manifested in particularly difficult, deeply isolating ways. They blamed their wives for their conditions. They blamed their wives for losing their jobs. They blamed their wives because they couldn’t drive anymore. They accused them of having affairs with the mailman or stealing their money. They urinated all over their houses, leaving the women cleaning for hours.

“’It was a constant battle of trying to keep him clean, keep him from having a UTI, keep his dignity, explain to him why it was all happening so he could understand it,’ Metcalf said.”

You can read this article in its entirety, click here.