Monthly Archives: January, 2016

Department of Aging wrap-up for Friday, January 29, 2016

PA department of aging logo

Each week the Pennsylvania Department of Aging releases a Friday newsletter with information relevant to activities, issues and events for older Pennsylvanians and persons with disabilities across the Commonwealth.

Message from the Secretary

“Though its impact is still being felt in communities and neighborhoods across Pennsylvania,one of the worst winter storms in the history of the commonwealth did not disturb the commitment of scores of social and health care workers who care for older Pennsylvanians.

“From hospitals and nursing homes, to personal care homes and group homes, direct care workers, cooks, dietary aides, nurses, and support staff from various other facility departments worked around the clock to make certain that residents who rely on them for care and shelter were tended to before, during, and after the storm.

“Administrators from facilities most directly impacted by the storm have shared countless stories hailing these often unsung heroes who left the solace of their own homes to ensure that their facility’s patients or residents would be safe, cared for and comfortable. Once such story involved an 18-year-old high school senior, Elsie McCarthy, who walked two miles so that she could be at her job at a Harrisburg-based assisted living community, ensuring that breakfast, lunch, and dinner was prepared, served, and cleared without interruption. Because of the dedication of workers like Ms. McCarthy, those who reside in such facilities don’t have to worry about having enough food or shoveling snow.”

Click here to continue reading the January 29 newsletter.

“Typewriter artist- An extraordinary man with a severe disability creates incredible works of art using a typewriter.”

typewriter

This Youtube video tells an amazing story.

“It’s been six years on June 25 since the world lost Paul Smith at the age of 85, but not before several generations had an opportunity to admire his distinct and intricate gallery of art. His legacy continues.”

“Known worldwide as the ‘Typewriter Artist,’ Paul Smith’s story spans eight decades, seven in which he created typewriter art. Having a severe case of spastic cerebral palsy that affected his speech, his mobility, and his fine motor coordination, Paul’s life began when opportunities were limited.

“In his time, Paul was not entitled to a mainstream education – he was not taught to read or write. Physicians were still recommending that children with his form of cerebral palsy be institutionalized. And, medical care wasn’t as progressive.”

Continue reading this “tribute to the typewriter artist” at the Cerebral Palsy Website.

 

“The difficulties doctors face in diagnosing autism” – The Conversation

difficulty diagnosing autism

“A recent survey of paediatricians found they often lacked enough information to accurately diagnose an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children. ASD is an important diagnosis not to miss. But it is equally important not to make the diagnosis when it is not truly present.

“ASD used to be split into groupings including autistic disorder, Asperger’s disorder and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified. However, these diagnoses are now collapsed into a single ASD diagnosis with a range of severity along the “spectrum”.

“To be diagnosed on this autistic spectrum, the individual must have difficulties in two areas.

“First, they must have persistent problems in social communication and interaction. This includes deficits in empathy, body language, facial expression and eye contact; and difficulties or lack of interest in social relationships and making friends.”

Continue reading this article in its entirety at The Conversation.

CDC Announces Critical Component in Elder Abuse Fight

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released the much-anticipated Elder Abuse Surveillance: Uniform Definitions and Recommended Core Data Elements.

elder abuse surveillance

The field of elder justices has long struggled with the challenge of comparing data from different jurisdictions or sources, each of which uses their own definition of “abuse” or “neglect.” By establishing and normalizing consistent definitions and data elements, it should become easier to compare apples to apples in order to better understand, and more effectively combat, elder abuse.

CDC worked with a wide range of stakeholders, including ACL, to develop these recommendations, which are consistent with ACL’s National Adult Maltreatment Reporting System (NAMRS) initiative.

“The terrible loneliness of growing up poor in Robert Putnam’s America” – The Washington Post

“Life is not something you do, it’s something you endure.”

SWARTHMORE, Pa. — “Robert Putnam wants a show of hands of everyone in the room with a parent who graduated from college. In a packed Swarthmore College auditorium where the students have spilled onto the floor next to their backpacks, about 200 arms rise.

“‘Whenever I say “rich kids,” think you,’ Putnam says. ‘And me. And my offspring.’

ourKids-singleParent

 

“The Harvard political scientist, famous for his book “Bowling Alone” that warned of the decline of American community, has returned to his alma mater to talk, this time, about inequality. Not between the 99 percent and the 1 percent, but between two groups that have also fallen further apart: children born to educated parents who are more likely to read to them as babies, to drive them to dance class, to nudge them into college themselves — and children whose parents live at the edge of economic survival.”

Read this Washington Post article in its entirety, click here.

Department of Aging wrap-up for Friday, January 22, 2016

PA department of aging logo

Each week the Pennsylvania Department of Aging releases a Friday newsletter with information relevant to activities, issues and events for older Pennsylvanians and persons with disabilities across the Commonwealth.

Click here to read the January 22 newsletter.

 

” Top 7 Senior Living Fears of Boomers” -Senior Housing News

by Mary Kate Nelson

“The baby boomers are coming to senior living—worries and misconceptions in tow. Before moving in themselves, boomers will consider senior living for their parents, and newly released survey findings may help providers quell their fears.

seven fearsSource: Holiday Retirement

“For example: Even though 37% of baby boomers consider themselves highly or somewhat likely to move their aging loved ones into a senior living community, 70% have some level of concern that doing so would put their loved one’s independence at risk.

“This is according to the survey commissioned by Lake Oswego, Oregon-based Holiday Retirement, the largest independent living operator in the country. The survey identifies, among other things, baby boomers’ top seven concerns when considering whether to move aging loved ones into senior living. The survey, which polled 1,000 adults between the ages of 50 and 69, was conducted by ORC International between Sept. 9-13, 2015.”

Read this article at Senior Housing News, click here.

“Veterans’ health care: doctors outside the VA need to know more about the veterans they treat” – The Conversation

Shropshire sheds a tear as she salutes during the national anthem at an interfaith vigil for the victims of the Tennessee shooting, at Olivet Baptist church in ChattanoogaVietnam veteran Euretha Shropshire sheds a tear as she salutes during the national anthem at an interfaith vigil for the victims of the Tennessee shooting, at Olivet Baptist church in Chattanooga, Tennessee, July 17, 2015. The suspect in the fatal shootings of four U.S. Marines travelled to Jordan and possibly other Middle Eastern countries last year, authorities said on Friday, as the investigation focused on any signs of a connection to Islamist militants. Mohammod Youssuf Abdulazeez, a Kuwaiti-born naturalized U.S. citizen, died on Thursday in a firefight with police after a rampage at two military facilities in Chattanooga, Tennessee. REUTERS/Tami Chappell – RTX1KRW0

“Each year the military discharges over 240,000 veterans to reintegrate into civilian society. It’s a professional transition, but it’s also a personal one.

“Veterans go from TRICARE, the Department of Defense’s own health care system, to navigating the ins and outs of the civilian health care system. Under TRICARE, military service members are cared for in a manner that meets their needs. When they’re discharged, their new health care providers might not know that they were ever in the military.

“Asking ‘Have you served in the military?’ may seem like a minor issue, but it’s actually much more important than you might think. And it’s a question that few doctors make a point of asking, even though many medical residents and medical students receive all or part of their clinical training at VA medical centers and hospitals.”

Click here to continue reading this article at The Conversation.

“5 things you should know about Medicare’s new end-of-life discussions” – PBS Newshour

eolEnd-of-life discussions with your physician or other licensed caregiver are now being paid for by Medicare. Talking about your wishes and the kind of health care you want to receive at the end of your life is probably not at the top of your bucket list, but such discussions could be very important. Photo by Jim Young/Reuters

by Philip Moeller

“End-of-life discussions with your physician or other licensed caregiver are now being paid for by Medicare — one of the program’s major consumer changes taking effect this year. Thinking and talking about your wishes and the kind of health care you want to receive at the end of your life are probably not at the top of your bucket list, or anywhere close, but such discussions could be very important.

“A big chunk of health care spending occurs in the final months of a person’s life, and it often brings very little benefit. While Medicare covers a lot of these expenses, particularly through its extensive coverage of hospice services, families are also on the hook for a lot of this end-of-life spending. Beyond dollars, the emotional burden of helping a loved one in their final days often is enormous.”

Continue reading this PBS Newshour report, click here.

 

“Police Get Schooled On Special Needs Interactions” – Disability Scoop

special training for leosHoward County Police Department recruit Michael Scanlon, left, talks with Jane Plapinger and her 13-year-old son Dave, who has autism. The recruits attended a pool party with the Howard County Autism Society to get first-hand experience on interacting with children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. (Kenneth K. Lam/The Baltimore Sun/TNS)

COLUMBIA, Md. –

“Say a young man is pacing outside a house.

“A police officer asks him to stop, but the young man keeps pacing. Maybe the young man notices the officer’s gun and just wants to touch it. He reaches …

“‘They may not know not to come up and touch their guns,’ Elizabeth Benevides said.

“Her teenage son has autism, and often repeats words said to him.

“‘If you’re an officer,’ she said, ‘you might think that’s really flippant.’

“Benevides plans this week to help train police recruits to resolve such encounters with ‘de-escalation tactics:’ speak calmly, give space, be patient.

Click here to read this article at Disability Scoop in its entirety.