Category Archives: Bullying

Berks County Link partners’ network collaborates in 1st Annual Scams Against Seniors Symposium

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Pennsylvania’s senior population grew by 13.5 percent from 2010 to 2016, according to a recent research report from the Pennsylvania State Data Center, which analyzes data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Meanwhile, Pennsylvania’s total population rose just 0.6 percent over that span.

Reports about scammers and con artists targeting persons age 6o and over are increasing. According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, “senior citizens especially should be aware of fraud schemes for the following reasons:

  • Senior citizens are most likely to have a “nest egg,” to own their home, and/or to have excellent credit—all of which make them attractive to con artists.
  • People who grew up in the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s were generally raised to be polite and trusting. Con artists exploit these traits, knowing that it is difficult or impossible for these individuals to say “no” or just hang up the telephone.
  • Older Americans are less likely to report a fraud because they don’t know who to report it to, are too ashamed at having been scammed, or don’t know they have been scammed. Elderly victims may not report crimes, for example, because they are concerned that relatives may think the victims no longer have the mental capacity to take care of their own financial affairs.
  • When an elderly victim does report the crime, they often make poor witnesses. Con artists know the effects of age on memory, and they are counting on elderly victims not being able to supply enough detailed information to investigators. In addition, the victims’ realization that they have been swindled may take weeks—or more likely, months—after contact with the fraudster. This extended time frame makes it even more difficult to remember details from the events.
  • Senior citizens are more interested in and susceptible to products promising increased cognitive function, virility, physical conditioning, anti-cancer properties, and so on. In a country where new cures and vaccinations for old diseases have given every American hope for a long and fruitful life, it is not so unbelievable that the con artists’ products can do what they claim.”

Today over 100 persons attended the Scams Against Seniors Symposium — A Michael Meitzler Award Event at the Scottish Rite Cathedral, 430 S 7th Ave, Reading, PA 19611.  Today’s event featured information tables with local and state resources, speakers, including Rev. Dr. Ronald W. Costen, PhD. & Attorney at Law-Elder Justice Specialist and Mary Bach from AARP’s Consumer Task Force and workshops on frauds, scams and identity theft from the PA Office of Attorney General & The PA Crime Prevention Officers’ Association.

programClick on the graphic above to download the program as a .pdf file.

 

fighting fraud

Other resources include:

The Pennsylvania Crime Prevention Officers’ Association

Pennsylvania Attorney General

Berks County Area Agency on Aging

Pennsylvania Link to Aging and Disability Resource


More about Michael Meitzler

“Berks man’s legacy helps keep senior citizens safe from scams” Reading Eagle

“Berks Co. man’s remains found in home nearly 3 years after death” – WFMZ-TV69


Seniors are in denial about their vulnerability | “It’s estimated that one in five Americans over the age of 65 are victims of financial abuse—and the average loss is a staggering $120,300. Financial abuse can the the form of a scam, or it can also be perpetrated by family or friends who syphon off money from older loved ones. Nearly half of older Americans surveyed recently by Wells Fargo reported they know someone who had been a victim of a scam.” – Money Magazine

 

 

“What You Can Do About Bullying in Assisted Living | Unfortunately, patterns of mistreatment don’t always end after middle school” – next avenue

Bullying-in-Long-Term-Care-Communities_175811082-750x485

by Jess Stonefield

Part of the Transforming Life as We Age Special Report

“A few years ago, a former co-worker got a call informing her that her grandmother had been in a fight. She had punched another resident at her assisted living facility and the director needed a member of her family to come and calm her. In the moment, some colleagues laughed at the thought. “Go, Grandma! Way to take matters into your own hands!” But as it turns out, the matter was serious. It was an example of the pervasive problem of bullying in assisted living communities.

“The idea that bullying would exist among older adults may surprise many, and it often goes undetected or unaddressed in assisted living communities. But an estimated 10 to 20 percent of residents in assisted living facilities, nursing homes and senior centers are mistreated by peers, according to an AARP article quoting an Arizona State University gerontologist.

“What’s the big deal about bullying?”

Click here to read this next avenue article in its entirety.

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY – “Developing Solutions for Social Isolation in the United States: Learning From the World”

We’re providing a total of $2.5 million in funding, looking for the best ideas from around the world that can address social isolation in the United States.

SOCIAL ISOLATION

by Maryjoan Ladden

I remember reading the story of a dying patient who, when asked who to call as his life was ending, he replied, ‘no one.’ He had absolutely no immediate family or close friends. Dr. Druv Khullar who wrote the piece noted ‘the sadness of his death was surpassed only by the sadness of his solitude. I wondered whether his isolation was a driving force of his premature death, not just an unhappy circumstance.’

“This profoundly sad story struck me to my core.

“Not everyone has a social network to call on when they need people by their side. Many people feel disconnected from society and from life, and that contributes to a host of physical, mental and emotional health problems. In fact, according to experts, social isolation is as bad for your health as smoking, obesity, elevated blood pressure, and high cholesterol.”

Click here to continue reading.

 

If you have an idea from abroad that just might work in America, see our new Call for Proposals!

 

See full Call for Proposals for more information.

 

National Bullying Prevention Month | Resources for All Stakeholders

bullying

“Bullying is not a normal part of childhood and is considered to be a serious public health problem. Recognizing that bullying behavior is an issue that demands the concerted and coordinated time and attention of parents, educators and school administrators, health care providers, policy makers, families, and others concerned with the care of children, Preventing Bullying Through Science, Policy, and Practice evaluates the state of the science on biological and psychosocial consequences of peer victimization and the risk and protective factors that either increase or decrease peer victimization behavior and consequences.

preventing bullyingClick on the graphic to download the report.

Too Scared For School (Bullying Documentary) – Real Stories | Shocking and emotional documentary about the pain and desperation of four young teenagers facing lives overshadowed by bullying.

“Bullying and suicide: What’s the connection?” – The Conversation

suicide 2For youth who identify as being bullied, the tendency to suicidality can be quite high.”

“Bullying, as many people know, can be a tremendously painful experience for a young person. The point has been driven home over the last decade by stories about teens like Phoebe Prince or Amanda Todd, who killed themselves after experiencing bullying.

“Recently, the parents of eight-year-old Gabriel Taye filed a federal lawsuit against the Cincinnati public schools, alleging that their son committed suicide because the school covered up and failed to prevent a culture of bullying.

“All 50 states have some kind of anti-bullying law, and schools are increasingly being called upon to implement bullying prevention programs.

“Bullying and suicide are both significant public health concerns for children and adolescents.”

Continue reading this article in its entirety at The Conversation.