Monthly Archives: September, 2017

“Years After Silently Combating Sexual Trauma, Female Veterans Seek Help” – California Healthline

assault military“Sheila Procella of Plano, Texas, is a veteran of both the U.S. Air Force and the Texas Air National Guard. She was diagnosed with military sexual trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in 2014, nearly three decades after her service. (Laura Buckman for Kaiser Health News)”

“Sheila Procella joined the Air Force in 1974 to ‘see the Earth,’ she said. She enlisted at the tail end of the Vietnam War, shortly after graduating from high school. Although she never left her home state of Texas during eight years of service, her office job proved to be its own battlefield.

“‘Some of us actually went to war, some of us had war right here in the States, going to work every day knowing we are going to be harassed,’ said Procella, now 62 and living in Plano, Texas.

“At the time, fewer than 3 percent of service members were women. Procella recalled the daily barrage of sexual comments, gestures and men grabbing her inappropriately. And one of her superiors made it clear that her hopes of moving up the career ladder were dependent on having sex with him.”

Read this article at California Healthline in its entirety, click here.

 

Friday Wrap-Up, September 29, 2017 | a message from the Secretary of Aging

Each week week the Office of the Secretary of Pennsylvania’s Department of Aging releases a Friday newsletter with information relevant to activities, issues and events for older Pennsylvanians and persons with disabilities across the Commonwealth. Click here to download the newsletter as a .pdf file.

You’re going to really like the Secretary’s comments about the new “senior” community center she visited. It is what these centers have to be.

melting pot

“How we put a price tag on hospitals | The data science that’s helping us crack the code of hospital cost variation.” – Amino

by Sameera Poduri

price on hospitals

“Economists and consumers alike have often observed (and suffered from) extreme cost variation in healthcare, not only based on the service itself and the doctor who performed it, but also determined by the facility where it was performed. Hospitals in particular are known to charge wildly different prices for similar care, and we’ve had little insight into why or how.

“Our first step toward uncovering healthcare costs led us to physician level cost estimates for more than 100 procedures, searchable by the doctor one might choose to perform that procedure. Such granularity can help people stay in network, calculate their out-of-pocket costs ahead of time, and budget for a procedure.

“Today, we’re excited to announce that we’ve put a dollar sign on 45,000 facility-insurer combinations across the country—including hospitals, imaging centers, and urgent care centers—so that people can not only understand the total cost of a procedure, but also know where it might be cheaper (and of the same or better quality) nearby.”

Click here to read this article at amino.com in its entirety.

“AI spots Alzheimer’s brain changes years before symptoms emerge” – New Scientist

ai“MRI scans may help identify early signs of the disease -baranozdemir/Getty”

“Artificial intelligence can identify changes in the brains of people likely to get Alzheimer’s disease almost a decade before doctors can diagnose the disease from symptoms alone.

“The technique uses non-invasive MRI scans to identify alterations in how regions of the brain are connected.

“Alzheimer’s is a neurodegenerative disease that is the leading cause of dementia for the elderly, eventually leading to loss of memory and cognitive functions.

“The race is on to diagnose the disease as early as possible. Although there is no cure, drugs in development are likely to work better the earlier they are given. An early diagnosis can also allow people to start making lifestyle changes to help slow the progression of the disease.”

Click here to read this New Scientist article in its entirety.

“Adapting to the Changes of Old Age” – Time Goes By | What it’s really like to get old

Here’s another column from one of our favorite sources.

plato on age“Being about midway into old age now, it seems to me that changes great and small come barreling down the pike lickety-split – that there are many more arriving at a much faster rate than at previous ages of life.

“I can’t prove that with facts and figures and numbers and charts but it feels about right and I’ve come to believe it is an important job of elderhood to learn to adapt as we are buffeted front and back, up and down, left and right and around again with each new, often unexpected development.

“It’s not easy. As you know, my life was upended three months ago with a cancer diagnosis. I’m still trying to find a way to make the large number of restrictions that control my days now as commonplace as, for example, brushing my teeth has always been.

“It’s frustrating that I’m not there yet. I have other things I’d rather do than try to remember if I took those pills after breakfast or treated my hands with that special lotion.”

Read Ronnie’s column in its entirety here.

plato on aging

SAVE THE DATE – The Pennsylvania Disability Employment and Empowerment Summit is December 6 & 7

12-6 pades

http://pades-summit.org/

“Does Getting Older Mean You No Longer Matter?” – next avenue

“How to remain engaged with the world as children leave and jobs end!”

older relevent

“Becoming less relevant is one aspect of aging that can catch us by surprise. It sneaks up on us. One day we have purpose and the next we feel it slipping away. We retire and our work colleagues get along just fine without us. We raise our kids and they grow up and no longer need us.

“While we can deny the evidence for a while, eventually we’re left to acknowledge the reality. When we feel relevant, we’re connected. We make a difference — to ourselves and others. When we don’t, we suspect that we just don’t matter as much anymore.

“Relinquishing Who We Were

“This sentiment usually occurs at the same time we begin to shed the roles we’ve played in our lives, according to University of Toronto associate professor of sociology, Markus Schafer. And these can be instrumental to our sense of relevance. ‘One of the challenges of aging is the shift in roles that helped define our identity,’ he says.”

Read this article in its entirety at next avenue, click here.

“At Florida Nursing Home, Many Calls for Help, but None That Made a Difference” – The New York Times

FL nursing“Outside the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills, where eight residents died on Sept. 13 in the wake of Hurricane Irma. Credit Jason Henry for The New York Times”

“HOLLYWOOD, Fla. — The emergency room workers at Memorial Regional Hospital rushed the first patient to Room 9, which was devoted to the hope and practice of arresting death. They threaded fluid lines into her veins and readied a breathing tube. Even through gloves, they could feel the heat corseting the 84-year-old woman’s body.

“As they prepared to insert a catheter, they saw what looked like steam rising from her legs.

“The numbers from the catheter’s temperature gauge would not stop climbing. The nurses, respiratory technicians and other medical staff watched it halt at last at 41.9 degrees Celsius — 107 degrees Fahrenheit.

“It was only the fourth-highest body temperature Memorial would record that morning among elderly patients being evacuated from the nursing home nearby, the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills, where air-conditioning had failed after Hurricane Irma chewed up power lines across the state.

“Eight residents of the nursing home were dead by the end of that day, Sept. 13, and three who were among the 140 evacuated have died since.”

Click here to continue reading this New York Times article in its entirety.

Friday Wrap-Up, September 22, 2017 | a message from the Secretary of Aging

 

Each week week the Office of the Secretary of Pennsylvania’s Department of Aging releases a Friday newsletter with information relevant to activities, issues and events for older Pennsylvanians and persons with disabilities across the Commonwealth. Click here to download the newsletter as a .pdf file.

Improve the care you give and learn more about the people you serve by taking free video training courses. Click here to access free training videos at the Pennsylvania Home Care Association Website.

 

“Are doctors recommending hospice too late?” – Futurity.com

pre-hospice

“Despite experiencing symptoms for months before the end of their lives, older adults are spending shorter periods of time in hospice.

“The finding suggests there may be a need for more attention to symptoms and disability for these elderly people—and perhaps earlier hospice admission.

“Researchers looked at information from a study of 562 people, aged 70 and older, who were not disabled when the study began but died over the following 16 years.

“Of these individuals, 244 (43.4 percent) were admitted to hospice during the last year of life. They were slightly older and more likely to have cognitive impairments (problems thinking and making decisions) than older adults who weren’t admitted to hospice.”

Read this article at Futurity.com in its entirety, click here.